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Cars equipped with electric engines or other alternative drives are making major inroads. Scientists at the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) set out to develop a suitable filling station for these vehicles. Launched in mid-February 2018, this project goes to create a fuel ‘pump’ for the future. This dispenser is to deliver renewable electrical power, hydrogen and methane in the most efficient, cost-effective and purpose-driven way possible. The Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy is funding this project with around €1.3 million. It will run for five years as part QUARREE 100, an initiative to test an urban quarter’s fully renewable power supply.

Vehicular mobility is sure to change markedly in the years ahead. Far more cars running on electricity sourced from wind and the sun will soon be out on the road. The same goes for fuel cell vehicles powered with renewable hydrogen and natural gas vehicles that run on methane, another climate-friendly fuel produced using solar power. The network of charging points and hydrogen filling stations is expanding on a massive scale. Some stations furnish both electricity and hydrogen, but none dispenses electrical power, hydrogen and methane. ZSW aims to change that with this project.

Tiered use of renewable energy

What the Stuttgart-based scientists have in mind is to develop a multi-energy dispenser. The idea is to use the grid to charge electric cars’ batteries with renewable electricity sourced from wind power plants and the like. A large stationary battery will store unused power when supply is greater than demand, and dispense it when demand is greater than supply. “If the battery is full and recharging electric cars cannot deplete it, this green electricity will be converted into hydrogen in a second step,” says ZSW’s Dr. Ulrich Zuberbühler by way of explanation. Fuel cell vehicles run on this type of energy. And if hydrogen production exceeds demand, the surplus gas goes into a storage tank.

Tomorrow’s filling station will include third stage to produce methane when the hydrogen storage tank is full and demand from fuel cell cars is low. Carbon dioxide will then be added to the hydrogen to convert into methane. Both gases react to a catalyst to form methane. This fuel is the main component of natural gas, so natural gas cars can readily use it. If refueling cars do not deplete the methane supply, the surplus gas is stored and then piped into the natural gas grid when the storage tank fills up.

With our project, the coupling of the electrical grid with mobility will not be limited to electric cars,” explains Zuberbühler. “The other alternative drives will also benefit from it.”

ZSW’s researchers are talking about tiered use of renewable energy. Their priority is to make the most of resources by minimizing energy losses. Stage one is the first choice and remains so until its potential is exhausted. The most efficient use of regenerative electricity is to power electric motors. None of the energy is lost in translation, and battery storage loss amounts to no more than ten percent. Stages two and three—conversion to hydrogen and then methanation—are only an option once demand for electrical power has been met. Electrical power can be converted to hydrogen at around 75 percent efficiency; the figure for methane is roughly 60 percent. These gases are long-term, zero-loss stores of energy. Efficiency increases by a few percentage points when the waste heat generated during the conversion process is put to use.

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Efforts to enhance components

With this project, ZSW aims to improve the efficiency, service life and cost-effectiveness of the two main components, a high-pressure alkaline electrolyzer and a plate methanation reactor. Scientists want to advance the state of the art for both on a 100-kilowatt scale. Electrolysis and methane synthesis will have to take place separately, which requires some form of hydrogen buffer or intermediate storage facility. The institute will develop a concept for this and assess its safety.

The researchers have three years to develop the technology, work out a safety concept and clarify all the details for approval. The results will be tested at an on-site demo facility starting in 2020.

Stepping up ‘sector coupling’

Green electricity accounts for around a third of the power in Germany’ grid, and its share is growing. This figure expected to rise to 65 percent by 2030. Off-grid use—for example, in electric cars and as an alternative fuel—would help make the transportation sector more climate-friendly. Little progress has been made on this front. The alternative fuels hydrogen and methane also have great advantages. They can serve as chemical media for long-term, loss-free energy storage. On top of that, they can be fed into Germany’s natural gas grid and used to heat buildings without leaving a carbon footprint. The term coined to describe this convergence of electricity, fuel and heating across industries is sector coupling.

The funding for this project is part of a joint initiative of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs to promote solar in building projects and energy-efficient urban development.

The Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg, ZSW) is one of the leading institutes for applied research in the areas of photovoltaics, renewable fuels, battery technology, fuel cells and energy system analysis. There are currently around 235 scientists, engineers and technicians employed at ZSW’s three locations in Stuttgart, Ulm and Widderstall. In addition, there are 90 research and student assistants.

Aguas Chañar has awarded Acciona Energía the supply of electricity to its main facilities, consisting of 100% renewable energy generated by the company in Chile.

Under the terms of the PPA contract signed by the companies, supplies will begin on 1 February 2018 for a long-term period, covering over 70% of Aguas Chañar’s needs in the Atacama region for consumption in a number of installations.

This 100% renewable electricity will avoid the emission of 26,500 tonnes of CO2 from thermal power plants per year, based on the energy mix of Chile.

All the energy supplied by Acciona will come from the company’s renewable installations in Chile, where it currently operates a 246 MWp photovoltaic plant (El Romero Solar) in the Atacama Desert and a 45 MW wind farm (Punta Palmeras) in the region of Coquimbo. It is now building a second wind farm with a capacity of 183 MW in the Araucanía Region.

Aguas Chañar, the exclusive integrated water cycle management rights holder in the Atacama region, works in the production and distribution of potable water and the collection, management and disposal of wastewater in the area. It provides a service to more than 270,000 people in nine municipalities in Atacama and operates 13 potable water treatment plants and 9 wastewater treatment facilities.

 “It is a great satisfaction for us to work with Aguas Chañar to supply 100% sustainable electricity supplies without any carbon footprint that are guaranteed by our renewable assets in Chile”, says Acciona Energía General Manager in Chile José Ignacio Escobar. “We are grateful for their trust in us, and that of other large Chilean companies, as this allows us to strengthen our corporate client portfolio in the country”, adds Mr. Escobar.

Aguas Chañar General Manager Claudio Bitran highlights the milestone of being the first company in the potable water production and distribution in Chile to supply more than 70% of its electricity consumption from non-conventional renewable energies. “This agreement ensures that our main processes function with clean energies and that we can take a step forward in caring for the environment by reducing our carbon footprint per liter produced. From now on, we can say that we are not only helping to produce water in the world’s most arid desert but doing it with clean energy, thanks to the endless sunshine in the Atacama region”.

Renault has revealed its new R110 electric motor and the 2018 model-year ZOE, Europe’s best-selling electric vehicle, which will be the first Renault EV to feature this 80kW powerplant which combines extra power with even greater driving enjoyment. Despite being the same size as the R90, the R110 is 12kW (16hp) more powerful than its predecessor. Drivers will benefit from crisper acceleration performance on trunk roads, since the new motor shaves almost two seconds off ZOE’s 80-to-120kph time. This is a significant improvement which provides even greater peace of mind at higher speeds.. At lower speeds, meanwhile, the R110 packs the same punch as the R90 from which it is derived thanks to the instant availability of peak torque of 225Nm, making ZOE as nimble as ever in urban areas.

“Thanks to this power boost, ZOE is even more responsive and versatile when used for journeys out of town,” says Elisabeth Delval, Assistant Director, Renault ZOE Programme. “In addition to being able to enjoy the pleasure of driving a ZOE, drivers will also benefit from the longest range available for a mass-market electric car.”

New R110 motor: Renault’s electric vehicle expertise

The new R110 motor is the latest fruit of Renault’s electric motor development and production strategy and further evidence of the expertise in this field of Europe’s number one electric vehicle manufacturer. The all-Renault R110 – an evolution of the R90, developed in just two years – is made in France at the make’s Cléon plant in Normandy and was designed by engineers working out of the Renault Technocentre, southwest of Paris, as well as in Cléon. In addition to carrying over the R90’s outstanding energy efficiency, the R110 packs a combination of electrical machine- and power electronics-related innovations that have yielded an extra 12kW with no increase in either weight or volume.

The introduction of the R110 takes the number of variants of the Renault motor available for Kangoo Z.E., Master Z.E., ZOE and Daimler’s Electric Drive Smart to five (44kW, 57 kW, 60 kW, 68 kW and 80 kW).

Android Auto for ZOE

Android Auto-enabled R-LINK Evolution is now available for ZOE, which means drivers will be able to display driving-compatible Android applications stored on their smartphone (including Waze, Deezer, Spotify, TuneIn, Skype, Messenger, Audible and many others available from Google Play Store) on their car’s multimedia screen.

Even more refined

The 2018 model-year ZOE range features a stylish new, dark, metallic body colour: Blueberry Purple. The high-end INTENS version of the popular electric city car can be specified with the new exclusive Blueberry Purple Pack which combines a purple exterior with a violet satin finish for the dashboard trim strip and air vent, gear lever base, loudspeaker surrounds, top stitching along with black and violet fabric upholstery.

Order books for ZOE equipped with the new R110 motor, Android Auto compatibility and Violet Blueberry Pack will open in France in March 2018.

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New IRENA report outlines how increasing share of renewables to 34% can boost economy, and help meet emission reductions goals

The EU can increase the share of renewable energy in its energy mix to 34 per cent by 2030 – double the share in 2016 – with a net positive economic impact, finds a report by IRENA, launched in Brussels.

Presenting the findings during a launch event, ‘Renewable Energy Prospects for the European Union’ – developed at the request of the European Commission – IRENA’s Director-General Mr. Adnan Z. Amin highlighted that achieving higher shares of renewable energy is possible with today’s technology, and would trigger additional investments of around EUR 368 billion until 2030 – equal to an average annual contribution of 0.3 per cent of the GDP of the EU. The number of people employed in the sector across the EU – currently 1.2 million – would grow significantly under a revised strategy.

Raising the share of renewable energy would help reduce emissions by a further 15 per cent by 2030 – an amount equivalent to Italy’s total emissions. These reductions would bring the EU in line with its goal to reduce emissions by 40 per cent compared to 1990 levels, and set it on a positive pathway towards longer-term decarbonisation. The increase would result in savings of between EUR 44 billion and EUR 113 billion per year by 2030, when accounting for savings related to the cost of energy, and avoided environmental and health costs.

“For decades now, through ambitious long-term targets and strong policy measures, Europe has been at the forefront of global renewable energy deployment,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “With an ambitious and achievable new renewable energy strategy, the EU can deliver market certainty to investors and developers, strengthen economic activity, grow jobs, improve health and put the EU on a stronger decarbonisation pathway in line with its climate objectives.”

Welcoming the timeliness of the report, Mr. Miguel Arias Cañete, European Commissioner for Energy and Climate Action said: “The report confirms our own assessments that the costs of renewables have come down significantly in the last couple of years, and that we need to consider these new realities in our ambition levels for the upcoming negotiations to finalise Europe’s renewable energy policies.”

The report highlights that all EU Member States have additional cost-effective renewable energy potential, noting that renewable heating and cooling options account for more than one-third of the EU’s additional renewables potential. Furthermore, all renewable transport options will be needed to realise EU’s long-term decarbonisation objectives.

Additional key findings from the report, include:

  • Reaching a 34% renewable share by 2030 would require an estimated average investment in renewable energy of around EUR 62 billion per year.
  • The renewable energy potential identified would result in 327 GW of installed wind capacity an additional 97 GW compared to business as usual, and 270 GW of solar, an 86 GW increase on business as usual.
  • Accelerated adoption of heat pumps and electric vehicles would increase electricity to 27 per cent of total final energy consumption, up from 24 per cent in a business as usual scenario.
  • The share of renewable energy in the power sector would rise to 50 per cent by 2030, compared to 29 per cent in 2015.
  • In end-use sectors, renewable energy would account for 42 per cent of energy in buildings, 36 per cent in industry and 17 per cent in transport.
  • All renewable transport options are needed, including electric vehicles and – both advanced and conventional – biofuels to realise long-term EU decarbonisation objectives.

The report is a contribution to the ongoing discussions on the European Commission’s ‘Clean Energy for All Europeans’ package, tabled in November 2016, which proposed a framework to support renewable energy deployment.

Renewable Energy Prospects for the European Union is part of IRENA’s renewable energy roadmap, REmap, which determines the potential for countries, regions and the world to scale up renewables to ensure an affordable and sustainable energy future. The roadmap focuses on renewable technology options in power, as well as heating, cooling and transport. The REmap study for the EU is based on deep analysis of existing REmap studies for 10 EU Member States (accounting for 73 per cent of EU energy use), complemented and aggregated with high-level analyses for the other 18 EU Member States.

Groupe Renault has partnered with southern Europe’s first high power charging network, E-VIA FLEX-E. The aim of the network is to reduce charging times and promote long-distance travel across Europe in new-generation electric cars.

The project will kick off at the end of 2018 with the inauguration of 14 High Power charging stations in Italy, France and Spain, including eight in Italy, four in Spain and two in France. The extra-urban network will comprise High Power Charging (HPC) stations with a capacity of between 150 kW and 350 kW located along motorways and expressways.

Renault’s partners in the E-VIA FLEX-E project include ENEL, Nissan, EDF, Enedis, Verbund and IBIL. The project is part of the European Commission’s Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) for Transport programme, which provides targeted investment in transport infrastructure to boost growth and competitiveness. CEF will fund half of the project’s total budget of €6.9 million.

Groupe Renault has supported the deployment of high power charging infrastructure for two years now in a bid to promote the use of electric cars. The Group has also partnered with the Ultra-E and High Speed Electric Mobility Across Europe networks in northern Europe, composed of 25 and 158 charging stations respectively.

Source: Groupe Renault

Smart Homes are no longer a vision of the future. Garages, shutters, heaters or electronic devices – nearly every household appliance can be controlled in real time via a smartphone. Smart Homes are everywhere – and with an energy storage system new possibilities are arising. For a smart home mainly smart devices are needed –  digital multipliers which are able to communicate with any other device. The energy storage systems from VARTA can work with the digital requirements of smart homes. The energy storage system portfolio form VARTA focuses on connectivity. The number of partner products, with which our energy storage systems are able to communicate, are rising steadily and keep all options open for installers and home owners. The partner network has grown to over a dozen compatible systems in the last two years.

“We stay open“                                             

All VARTA energy storage systems are able to communicate with measure- and control devices, e.g. smart homes, smart load, e-mobility and data logging, and control the load management of up to four external circuits, e.g. E-Bikes or heat pumps. “For installers and end consumers it’s important to have combinable and expandable systems around the house. They need to get along“, explained Gordon Clements, General Manager Residential Power & Energy VARTA Storage GmbH. That’s why the Bavaria-based manufacturer offers an open system, which is compatible with many applications and entrusts the decision to the installer and end consumer. “With a VARTA energy storage system you don’t get stuck with one provider. We stay open for a lot of application possibilities and extend our product network continously“, continued Clements.

Energy storage systems in Smart Homes 

The smart energy storage systems are able to communicate with nearly all components and systems of the home and energy technology. Every end consumer can decide how the provided solar energy is used. If there is still an energy surplus while charging the storage system, in combination with the smart water heater from my-PV the surplus can be used to provide hot water. The storage system evolves into a energy control center in your home. The data exchange with cross-platform control and automation systems like myGEKKO is also possible.

The solution for an integration of the energy storage system in the home energy supply or the increase of the self-consumption rate is smart energy management because the consumption of the solar energy ist not that profiable anymore. More and more solar system owner realize this and install an energy storage system. If the solar system is providing more energy than the storage system needs, the energy surplus can be used to charge an E-Bike or to produce hot water. It enables a hot shower and e-bike driving fun without buying energy from the supplier.

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According to WindEurope’s annual wind statistics, Europe installed 16.8 GW (15.7 GW in the EU) of gross additional wind power capacity in 2017, marking a record year on annual installations. With a total net installed capacity of 169 GW, wind energy remains the second largest form of power generation capacity in Europe, closely approaching gas installations.

New wind farm installations were up 20% on 2016 and beat the previous 2015 record of 12.8 GW. Onshore wind capacity grew by 12.5 GW and offshore wind by 3.1 GW. 2017 was a record year for both onshore installations grew 9% while offshore grew 101% compared to 2016.

Seven EU Member States had a record year in new wind energy installations: Germany (6.6 GW), UK (4.3 GW), France (1.7 GW), Finland (577 MW), Belgium (476 MW), Ireland (426 MW) and Croatia (147 MW). Germany installed the most wind power capacity in 2017, with 42% of the total EU new installations and registered the highest annual increase from 16% to 20% of wind energy in its electricity demand. Germany remains the EU country with the largest installed wind power capacity, followed by Spain, the UK and France. 16 EU countries have more than 1 GW of wind power installed. Nine of these have more than 5 GW installed. Denmark is the country with the largest share of wind energy in its electricity demand with 44%.

That it was a record year reflects the fact that lot of the new projects were ‘pushed through the gates’ to benefit from feed-in-tariffs and other old support schemes while they still applied. This was especially the case in Germany with its 5 GW of new onshore, and was also true for the UK and France.

Wind power installed more than any other form of power generation in Europe in 2017. Wind power accounted for 55% of total power capacity installations. Renewable energy as a whole accounted for nearly all new EU power installations in 2017: 23.9 GW out of a total 28.3 GW. Conventional power sources such as fuel oil and coal continue to decommission more capacity than they install. The amount of decommissioned gas-fired generation capacity was almost equal to the amount of newly-commissioned gas-fired generation capacity.

Wind energy investments accounted for 52% of the new clean energy finance in 2017, compared to 86% in 2016. 2017 was also a record year for new investments in future wind farms. 11.5 GW worth of projects reached Final Investment Decision: 9 GW in onshore wind and 2.5 GW in offshore. But the value of these investments at €22.3bn (€14.8bn onshore and €7.5bn offshore) was 19% down on 2016. Cost reductions in the wind industry supply chain and increased competition in auctions gave investors more capacity for less cash.

Germany was the biggest investor in 2017, generating a total financing activity of €6.7bn for the construction of new onshore and offshore wind farms. This accounts for 30% of the total wind energy investments made in 2017. The UK came second to Germany with €5bn, or 22% of the total.

Wind energy in Europe now has a total installed capacity of 169 GW: 153 GW onshore and 16 GW offshore. Germany remains the country with the largest installed wind power capacity (56 GW). It’s followed by Spain (23 GW), the UK (19 GW) and France (14 GW). With a share of 18% wind remains the second largest form of power generation capacity in Europe, closing in on natural gas. Wind energy generated 336 TWh in 2017, enough to cover 11.6% of EU electricity demand. In Germany wind was 20% of power. It was 44% in Denmark, and 24% in Ireland and Portugal.

Despite the strong figures the medium and longer term outlook for wind is uncertain. The transition to auctions has been messier than hoped. And crucially we lack clarity from many Governments on their ambitions for renewables post-2020. Countries need to start clarifying how much wind energy they want to deploy in the future. This will give visibility to the industry, allowing us to plan ahead and reduce costs. And it will allow others such as Transmission System Operators to plan the necessary infrastructure build-out,” said WindEurope CEO, Giles Dickson.

Source: WindEurope

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Technology Radar 2018 “Renewable Energy” report – launched by Lloyd’s Register (LR) – analyses the sizeable renewable energy impacts in the next five years and beyond. It provides answers from leading industry experts on their optimism, concerns and investment outlook on tomorrow’s energy mix.

If there were doubts that renewable energy sources could ever compete effectively with oil, natural gas and coal in power generation, developments in the past two years should have dispelled them! But, what will it take for renewable energy to become the primary form of energy consumed?

The LR 2018 Technology Radar – Renewable Energy study asks the question: when will renewable energy become the dominant source of energy? Furthermore, the study examines which technologies are likely to have the greatest impact in different countries, and what are the key drivers and inhibitors for success.

The research sought the insights and opinions of leaders across the sector, as well as a survey of 800 professionals and experts around the world. The survey included respondents from organisations across the renewables value chain, including traditional energy companies with renewable energy assets or activities.

Respondents were asked to give their perspective on the challenges that need to be overcome for renewables to be the primary form of energy consumed, the rate of growth in their country and to rate a number of technologies and developments in terms of their potential impact, the amount of time it would take for these technologies to hit the market, and how likely they are to be adopted once they do. Respondents were also asked to reflect on the pace and success of innovation in their sector – and what they see as the major drivers and blockers post 2018.

Key findings include:

  • Respondents expect grid parity for solar to be achieved first in China (2022), followed by Spain and UAE in 2024, and by Australia and the US in 2025. For wind power generation, grid parity is expected in Germany and UK by 2024, USA and Denmark in 2025, and in Sweden by 2033.
  • Although a minority of respondents (10%) believe that renewables have already overtaken fossil fuels in their country, or will do so in the next two years, 58% believe that this milestone will not be reached until after 2025.
  • Development costs remain the primary argument against pursuing renewables in their country. However, the cost of building solar capacity for utility-scale generation has more than halved in the past ten years, which has helped to fuel the rapid expansion of solar capacity worldwide since 2014.
  • More than 45% of the surveyed executives (including 55% of those based in Europe) say that resistance to onshore wind turbines in their countries is too strong to enable significant growth from this source.
  • An overwhelming 71% agree that technology advances will do more in the next five years to improve the economic case for renewables than policy or regulatory changes. There is an expectation for advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), demand response management (DRM) systems, networked sensors and accuracy of asset monitoring data to have a beneficial impact on operational performance. However, 36% identify policy inconsistency as an inhibiting factor.
  • 37% of respondents indicate the slow development of storage technologies as the most important factor inhibiting the growth of renewables in the energy mix. Utilities need to be able to call on energy producers for additional power whenever it is required, whether for load balancing or meeting surges. Green hydrogen provides an alternative form of storage to electrochemical batteries as hydrogen fuel cells can store power for considerably longer.
  • 42% of respondents agree that reaching grid parity will not be enough to cause a sustained increase in investment in renewables. Subsidies are critical to support developments in most markets.

The future of the energy system depends on whether we develop solutions that provide flexibility to efficiently integrate renewable energy sources. Intelligent building technology is the key to success. The joint venture planned by SMA and Danfoss aims to provide supermarket operators with an integrated solution that interconnects cooling and refrigeration technology, photovoltaics, energy storage technology and e-mobility. Intelligently managing loads and integrating the overall system into the energy market allows supermarket operators to reduce their operating expenditure, optimize their carbon footprint and considerably improve their long-term competitiveness. In addition, they will become a key component of the energy system of the future.

“Our expertise in photovoltaics, battery-storage systems and energy management is a complementary fit with Danfoss’ long-standing experience in cooling and refrigeration technology and its access to customers in the food retail segment,” said Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Reinert, Board Member for Operations and Technology of SMA Solar Technology AG. “I am delighted that this planned joint venture will allow us to further expand our strategic partnership with Danfoss.”

“The food retail segment is both of strategic importance and a playing field for innovation,” said Jürgen Fischer, President of Danfoss Cooling. “Innovative products from cooling and heating technology combined with photovoltaics, energy storage and charging stations will be used in the supermarket of the future. Supermarkets will not only provide fresh goods, but also transform the utility grid, which will become more reliable, greener and more flexible. Danfoss and SMA are very well positioned to tap into this new market. As part of this planned joint venture, headquartered in Hamburg, Germany, we will work together to develop our tried-and-tested technology and secure ourselves a leading market position in this segment.”

SMA’s newly founded subsidiary, Coneva GmbH, will cooperate with Danfoss’ Cooling Segment to design a service offering tailored to the individual requirements of the food retail segment. “The SMA energy management platform ennexOS is an ideal tool for optimizing the energy consumption of retailers using parameters like the current electricity prices, outside temperature, solar irradiation and temporary grid requirements,” explained Jochen Schneider, general manager of Coneva GmbH. “Surplus self-generated electricity can either be sold directly or stored in electric and thermal storage systems. The integration into the energy market also allows us to secure the supply of cost-effective, environmentally friendly energy. In addition, we can integrate charging stations.

The planned joint venture is likely subject to the approval of competent antitrust authorities.

With its commitment to address emissions and noise regulations in Europe, EMOSS Mobile Systems has developed an Allison transmission-equipped electric semi-truck that has a range exceeding 300 miles.

The EMOSS Electric Vehicle with Extender Range (E.V.E.R.) semi-truck utilizes a 120 kilowatt-hour (kWh) battery pack and a liquefied petroleum gas electricity generator to recharge the battery and achieve maximum range. It is further equipped with an Allison 4500 fully automatic transmission and rated for a gross combination weight of up to 50 metric tons.

“For us, the Allison gearbox is the only combination that gets us the right performance,” said Martijn Noordam, chief technology officer at EMOSS. “Customers who have driven the Allison-equipped EMOSS trucks are 100-percent happy with them. They never thought a start-stop duty-cycle on a 30 percent grade was realistic, yet the truck has executed perfectly.”

Calibrated to use six forward gears when fully-laden, the Allison transmission is critical for hauling heavier payloads and navigating challenging topographies, in countries such as Switzerland and Austria, where mountains and steep slopes are frequent.

“Allison remains committed to the evolution and optimization of the drive train and all forms of commercial vehicle propulsion,” said Randy Kirk, senior vice president of product engineering at Allison. “The Allison automatic provides a proven, immediate and well-integrated solution that enables electrification across a broad range of commercial applications.”

The Allison automatic transmission is key to the driveline. The transmission provides torque multiplication to reduce demand on the electric motor and the battery pack. It also enables the electric motor to operate within the optimal efficiency range for a larger portion of the drive cycle, reducing energy consumption, extending the vehicle’s range and facilitating the use of less-expensive, lighter and smaller components.

EMOSS unveiled the Allison-equipped E.V.E.R. truck, based on a DAF chassis, in November at the eCarTec exhibition in Munich, Germany and plans to commence testing with pilot customers later this year. In addition to the E.V.E.R. truck, EMOSS is currently developing Allison transmission-equipped electric trucks for use in construction, delivery and refuse applications.  These applications include dump trucks, medium-duty straight trucks, refuse collection vehicles and additional semi-truck configurations.

With over a decade of experience in electric mobility, and its full electric powertrain development and integration expertise, EMOSS is a partner for bus and truck manufacturers. Under its own brand, EMOSS is an OEM for electric trucks, buses and vans, as well as auxiliary/battery systems.

 

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