Siemens receives major order for 102 wind turbines for offshore wind power plant

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Siemens has received a major order for its offshore wind power business: the company is to supply, install and commission 102 wind turbines, each with a capacity of seven megawatts and a rotor diameter of 154 meters, for the East Anglia ONE project. The customer is ScottishPower Renewables, a subsidiary of Iberdrola S.A. The 714 megawatt wind power plant will be the largest project in terms of capacity for Siemens so far. Once operational in 2020, the ecofriendly electricity generated by the project is expected to be sufficient for around 500,000 British households. Siemens will additionally be responsible for servicing the wind farm for an initial period of five years.

The East Anglia ONE offshore wind power plant is to be erected around 45 kilometers off the British east coast over an area of 300 square kilometers. The 102 Siemens direct-drive wind turbines of type SWT-7.0-154 will be installed on jacket foundations. The nacelles shall be manufactured in Cuxhaven, Germany. Siemens plans to produce the corresponding wind turbine blades for East Anglia ONE at its Hull facility. The port of Great Yarmouth will serve as pre-assembly harbor for the project. The first wind turbines are scheduled to be installed in the summer of 2019, with the start of commercial operation scheduled for 2020.

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Siemens has also been awarded a long-term service agreement which includes remote monitoring and diagnostics services to help ensure the long-term reliability, performance and availability of the wind turbines. The logistics approach will feature the availability of a helicopter that will be based near Lowestoft port and used mainly in winter when the use of crew transfer vessels (CTVs) is not feasible due to high wave conditions and rough seas.

This marks the second offshore wind project between Siemens and ScottishPower Renewables. Siemens previously supplied this partner with wind turbines with a total capacity of 389 MW for the West of Duddon Sands project in the Irish Sea.

 

Source: Siemens