Monthly Archives: octubre 2018

Portada_SepFEnergy_Octubre18

Special report focusing on CHP, published as a separate issue to the October 2018 edition of FuturENERGY for special distribution at the XIV Annual Congress of COGEN España, an event that ran on October, 23 in Madrid and at which FuturENERGY has an active presence as media partner.

This special report includes the following:

CHP: the change has begun…but it is not enough
Calculation and geographical distribution of thermal demand in mexico: the Heat Map
Study on the impact of cleaning biogas on the performance of CHP systems
Highly efficient energy production and management at a brewery facility
New range of powerful medium speed V-engines
Sustainable energy for a campsite in a protected natural environment: the Island of Ons

Read more…

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The first offshore wind farm one hundred per cent designed and operated by a Spanish company

Iberdrola has officially cut the ribbon on Wikinger offshore wind farm, one of the company’s most iconic power plants in the world, having invested over €1.4 billion. Wikinger is fully operational and its 350 MW are connected to the German grid, supplying efficient renewable energy to 350,000 homes (representing some 20% of the energy demand of the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern). This flow of clean energy will have a positive environmental impact since it displaces the emission of nearly 600,000 tons of CO2 per year.

The Wikinger project marks Iberdrola’s entry into the German electricity market, where it has just been awarded the construction of two other offshore wind farms: Baltic Eagle (476 MW) and Wikinger Süd (10 MW). Together with Wikinger, these three wind farms, located off the island of Rügen, will give rise
to the largest offshore wind complex in the Baltic Sea, with a total installed capacity of 836 MW and a combined investment of €2.5 billion.

Wikinger is the first offshore wind farm to be designed and operated one hundred per cent by a Spanish company. It has consolidated Iberdrola as Europe’s leading company in renewable energy, capable of developing projects in markets as competitive as Germany and meeting the demanding planning conditions set by German authorities. In addition, it has served to boost the entire supply chain, benefiting companies across Europe, including Navantia and Windar.

This project has come to fruition thanks to the multidisciplinary and multinational composition of the team set up by Iberdrola and its network of first-rate international suppliers and contractors. Over 2,000 employees from 20 different countries participated in this milestone project. Iberdrola has had to overcome the technological challenges inherent to this type of work and the difficulties arising from the extreme weather conditions in the Baltic Sea.

Wikinger, a mark for Iberdrola

Located off the north-east coast of the German island of Rügen, Wikinger brings together the main themes of Iberdrola’s strategy: strong investment in the development of renewable energies, commitment to reducing emissions, technological innovation, international growth, opening of new markets and business lines to its suppliers, and an important boost for the European naval industry.

To build the project, 280 piles were installed. Measuring 40 metres in length by 2.5 m in diameter, and a unit weight of 150 t, they were all built by Spanish company Windar. A total of 70 foundations were laid on them, each weighing 620 t, manufactured by Bladt Industries in Lindo (Denmark) and Navantia, at its shipyard in Fene (Spain).

The 5-MW Siemens Gamesa AD 5-135 wind turbines were manufactured in the company’s plants in Bremerhaven and Stade (Germany). These are the wind turbines with the highest power rating and largest dimensions that Iberdrola has installed thus far. With a total height of 165 m, they are made up of a 75-m high tower, a 222-t nacelle and a 135-m diameter rotor, with each blade measuring 67 m long.

Finally, one of Wikinger’s key pieces of infrastructure is the Andalucía offshore substation, which will be used jointly by Iberdrola and 50Hertz, an electricity system operator in Germany. Weighing around 8,500 tonnes, the energy heart of the wind farm was also built by Navantia in Puerto Real in southern Spain.

Commitment to offshore wind power

Offshore wind energy is one of the keys to Iberdrola’s growth and the company has undertaken notable projects in this sector in the United Kingdom, Germany and France. These large investments will help advance the transition to a decarbonised energy model and combat climate change. These are the main projects underway:

West of Duddon Sands (WoDS): Located in the Irish Sea, WoDS was the first offshore wind farm the Iberdrola Group was involved in. It was developed by the company in consortium with Orsted and came into operation in 2014. It has 389 MW capacity and the investment was over £1.6 billion.

East Anglia One (EAO): Mega-project currently under construction in British waters in the North Sea, it will become one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms when it starts operating in 2020. It will involve an estimated investment of £2.5 billion and have a capacity of 714 MW.

Saint-Brieuc: This 496-MW facility will be located 20 km off the coast of Brittany in northern France, about 100 kilometres from the city of Rennes. It will have 62 Siemens-Gamesa turbines, with 8 MW unit capacity.

Vineyard Wind: Iberdrola, through Vineyard Wind, recently received authorisation from the Massachusetts Electric Distribution Companies (EDC) to construct a wind farm off the north-east coast of the United States. The project, which represents the company’s first large-scale offshore wind farm venture in that country will have 800 MW capacity.

Source: Iberdrola

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Italy derived most of its electricity from thermal power in 2017, contributing with a 50.7% of its installed capacity, and with natural gas alone accounting for 41%, according to GlobalData. The company’s latest report ‘Italy Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2018 – Market Trends, Regulations, and Competitive Landscape’ reveals that, government policy is oriented towards scrapping coal based capacity between 2025 and 2030, while renewable energy auctions, to be started by 2020, will help to compensate for this loss.

Renewable power is Italy’s fastest-growing energy source, owing to the 2011 referendum that closed any option for the government to restart nuclear power generation and a rising need to ensure energy security. Solar PV and wind power are the leading renewable sources.

Installed non-hydro renewable capacity increased from 1.7 GW in 2000 to 34.5 GW in 2017. Italy recorded notable progress with respect to the development of installed solar capacity, which grew from 19 MW in 2000 to around 19.7 GW in 2017. The onshore wind market also grew exponentially, from 364 MW to 9.8 GW, owing to strong policy support from the government in the form of FiTs. From 2018 to 2030, renewable installed capacity is expected to grow to 63.4 GW in 2030.

Continuous modifications to the support schemes deter long-term investment planning and hinder access to financing and unclear taxation rules are also a significant barrier, especially for biofuels.

GlobalData’s report also finds that gas and oil-based capacities are expected to remain stable in the country with some of its oil-based capacity expected to be converted to gas. Coal based capacity is expected to cease beyond 2024 due to the decommissioning of the existing coal based power plants.

Installed thermal capacity grew from 53.5 GW in 2000 to 58.8 GW in 2017 at a CAGR of 0.6%. Thermal capacity accounted for 50.7% of installed capacity in 2017, of which gas contributed 41%, while coal and oil contributed respective shares of 7.5% and 2.2%. From 2018 to 2030, installed thermal capacity is expected to decrease to 51.1 GW, at a negative CAGR of 1.1%.

Italy imports more than 90% of its coal requirement from South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, Colombia, and the US. It possesses small deposits of coal reserves, most of which are in South Sardinia. It also imports gas, primarily from Algeria and Russia. Although it possesses economically accessible gas reserves, a declining trend in gas production has been observed since the mid-1990s, caused by national energy policies formulated by the government that do not support gas production. However, the government is increasing the share of renewable energy sources over concerns over energy security.

Thermal power’s share is expected to be overshadowed by non-hydro renewable power, with its share in installed capacity declining to 36.9%. The share of non-hydro renewable capacity is expected to increase to 45.8% by 2030.

Source: GlobalData

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Soltec has started supplying and installing its equipment at an 84.7 MW solar PV power plant in Spain. Other such projects are on the near horizon. The European Union’s clean energy directive sets a binding target of 20 percent final power consumption from renewable sources by 2020, and Spain will comply or exceed.

Located in the Region of Murcia in Southeast Spain, the PV power plant will benefit from high solar irradiation and optimal climate conditions. Adding value to the project are Soltec’s headquarters and the Solhub logistics center within a few miles of the construction site. Around 2,900 units of Soltec’s SF7 seventh generation horizontal single-axis solar tracker will be supplied.

Corporate Social Responsibility is having an important role in this project. Soltec is training local people for employment in construction, and disabled persons will carry out appropriate tasks. Underground offtake cabling and a wildlife corridor are incorporated to reduce environmental impact in addition to standard SF7 features that reduce earth grading, earth penetrations, and emissions during construction.

CEO of Soltec Raúl Morales explains: “Our standard tracker features reduce material and installation time compared to others. SF7 has fewer piles-per-MW, a lower parts count, fewer installation operations, and greater tolerance of construction variables among other advantages. The combined result of higher yield performance and robust design is what customers rely on when choosing us.”

Source: Soltec

MAN Energy Solutions has won an EPC-contract to set up a highly efficient, combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plant for Progressive Energy, the energy arm of the ElcaTex Group in Choloma, Honduras. The plant will be powered by 3 × MAN 18V51/60 engines with an overall capacity of 54.8 MW, generating power and steam for a nearby textile factory.

MAN Energy Solutions will take an EPC (engineering, procurement and construction) role in the project and will be responsible for the construction of the entire plant.

For textile manufacturing, steam is as important as power, which is why Elcatex Group were looking for a solution to efficiently produce electricity as well as steam to drive its manufacturing footprint. Thanks to the new plant, the company will be able to increase its energy efficiency while becoming more autonomous in its steam supply chain.

While the MAN 51/60 engines will operate on heavy fuel oil (HFO) once the new plant opens, Progressive Energy plans to convert them to gas operation as soon as a secure supply of LNG (Liquid Natural Gas, LNG) becomes available. The switch to gas will reduce the plant’s emissions even further.

Source: MAN Energy Solutions

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Ingeteam has announced that it received DNV GL’s “Shop Approval in Renewable Energy” certification for the wind converter manufacturing facility recently established by the company in the Tamil Nadu region. Ingeteam’s new facility is the first-ever wind converter factory to receive such a certificate in India. DNV GL’s Shop Approval is awarded upon successful completion of a comprehensive audit, and will enable Ingeteam to simplify the scope of subsequent quality inspections, or even, in some cases, exempt the company and its clients from audits for a period of three years.

DNV GL’s Shop Approval certification guarantees that a workshop operates within a high-standard manufacturing environment, and that adequate working procedures and methods are consistently deployed by qualified staff. It is independent from component, type or project certification and is always workshop specific. With this scheme, DNV GL offers next level certification and standardization, going beyond modules and elements to include all technical aspects laid down in standards and recommended practices.

We are proud to be the very first manufacturer to receive this important certification for a wind converter manufacturing facility in India. It is a rigorous and wide-ranging audit that guarantees that Ingeteam manufactures products with an equal commitment to quality anywhere in the world. In addition, it will enable Ingeteam and its customers to deal with minimal DNV GL plant inspections for three years, thereby reducing the time and costs for any future equipment to be manufactured at our plant. It is a serious guarantee of manufacturing competitiveness that we are offering to customers,” explained Ion Etxarri Sangüesa, R&D Quality Team Leader of Ingeteam Wind Energy.

Ingeteam’s new Indian wind facility, built near Chennai, is poised to be a strategic manufacturing centre for Ingeteam’s business in India. It will enable the company to increase the supply of quality components to wind turbine manufacturers in this booming, and extremely competitive market. The 3,500 m² plant is equipped with state-of-the-art production technology and will manufacture electrical components following the same industry-leading standards and processes as Ingeteam’s other production facilities around the world.

Source: Ingeteam

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Foto cortesía: China Solar

The move by China in May this year to slash subsidies for domestic utility-scale solar projects will ultimately benefit developers in the US who rely on imported solar panels to revive projects and jobs, says GlobalData.

Solar power developers in the US have been struggling since early 2018 due to two separate policy decisions announced in the US and China. In January 2018, the US government imposed tariffs of 30% on imports of solar products to safeguard the interests of local manufacturers.

Hit by higher costs of imports, many developers announced cancelation of their projects. Utility-scale solar developers like Cypress Creek Renewables, LLC and Southern Current cancelled or deferred projects worth more than $2.5bn. Some developers even started negotiations to restructure their power purchase agreements due to higher costs resulting from tariffs.

According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), the US solar industry employs more than 250,000 people with about 40% in the installation sector and 20% in the manufacturing sector. Since the majority of them were employed by project developers, the industry started witnessing job cuts after the implementation of import tariffs.

On the other hand in May 2018 China, which has been struggling to build infrastructure to link the solar projects to the grid, announced a cut in the feed-in-tariff subsidy to reduce the surge in solar installations. Subsidy cuts in China have resulted in reduced demand for solar products within the country. Local Chinese manufacturers are now looking to export more panels, resulting in an oversupply in the global solar PV module market, which will further reduce the prices.

As a result, developers such as Inovateus Solar have become more optimistic. The company has closed a deal to develop a 6 MW solar PV plant in the city of Pratt, Kansas. Pine Gate Renewables, a North Carolina-based solar installer, has welcomed the move, since the lower prices will help the economics of projects already in the pipeline.

Following the announcement made in China, many developers will revive their hiring plans and the industry will witness an influx of jobs. So the drop in prices globally and in the US will help developers to revive projects and jobs which were put on hold after the import tariffs levied previously.

Source: GlobalData

Among innovative technology providers developing a thermal energy storage system, Norway-based cleantech company EnergyNest is currently one of the partners selected by multinational energy provider Enel for the analysis of the benefits and impacts of the integration of its technology in one of Enel’s numerous power generation assets. According to EnergyNest, impressive economic and climate-relevant figures could be achieved by the company’s latest thermal energy storage technology when integrated in full-scale: annual CO2 reduction of up to 45,000 tons, 14 million liters of fuel oil saved per year and project payback in less than three years.

The collaboration launched with EnergyNest gives Enel the chance to evaluate EnergyNest’s Thermal Energy Battery solution in real-life conditions and identify full-scale business-applications for the technology integrated into thermal power plants. The objective of the innovative project is to demonstrate how waste heat recovery in Thermal Energy Storage can increase flexibility and sustainability of thermal power plants. This activity will allow Enel to assess technology robustness, its potential contribution to increasing efficiency, and its positive environmental impact.

EnergyNest has unveiled its first Thermal Battery Module produced in its new manufacturing hub in Europoort, Rotterdam. Manufacturing for two commercial projects is now expected to start at the end of the year. EnergyNest’s innovative battery modules consist of locally-sourced, recyclable materials – framed steel pipes set with Heatcrete, a high-performance thermal-energy-storing concrete developed in partnership with HeidelbergCement, Germany’s multinational buildings material company.

Source: EnergyNest

EU action to support carbon capture and storage and innovative renewables has not succeeded, according to a new report from the European Court of Auditors. Between 2008 and 2017, ambitious targets were set, but EU support for demonstration projects achieved little in terms of projects delivered and results achieved, say the auditors. The EU needs to adapt its new Innovation Fund to reach its objectives, they add.

In 2009, the EU launched two large funding programmes to support carbon capture and storage and innovative renewables: the European Energy Programme for Recovery and the New Entrants’ Reserve 300 programme. With an overall spending target of €3.7 billion, both programmes set ambitious targets for the delivery of carbon capture and innovative renewables. Under the 2015 Paris Agreement, the EU is committed to at least a 40% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, complementing its ambition to achieve a low-carbon economy by 2050.

The auditors looked at the design, management and coordination of both programmes, and assessed whether they had made the progress expected in terms of helping carbon capture and innovative renewables advance towards commercial deployment. They visited projects in Germany, Spain, the Netherlands, Poland and the United Kingdom.

They found that the Energy Programme for Recovery contributed positively to the development of the offshore wind sector, but fell short of its ambitions for carbon capture. Meanwhile, the New Entrants’ Reserve programme delivered no successful carbon-storage projects and made little progress in supporting the demonstration of a wider range of innovative renewable-energy technologies.

Adverse investment conditions affected both programmes, note the auditors. Uncertainty in regulatory frameworks and policies hampered or delayed the progress of many innovative renewable energy and carbon-capture projects. The report also highlights the key role of volatile and lower-than-expected carbon market prices after 2011 in the failure of carbon capture and storage deployment.

The auditors found that the design of the New Entrants’ Reserve programme limited the Commission’s and the Member States’ ability to respond effectively to changing circumstances. Project selection and decision-making processes were complex, and other design features constrained the programme’s flexibility. Major improvement is required in coordination to enhance coherence and bring more clarity, say the auditors. They also raise concerns about the lack of clear accountability and control arrangements for the New Entrants’ Reserve Programme. Funds for this programme did not pass through the EU budget, and are not recorded in the EU balance sheet.

The EU is now preparing to launch the Innovation Fund in 2021 to help speed up the transition to a low-carbon economy. With this in mind, the auditors recommend that the European Commission should:

• increase the potential for effective EU support for such projects;
• improve the project selection and decision-making procedures for the forthcoming Innovation Fund, and ensure its flexibility to respond to external developments;
• enhance its internal coordination for more coherent targeting of EU support;
• ensure accountability for the Innovation Fund and the New Entrants’ Reserve Programme.

Source: European Court of Auditors

The European Commission and Breakthrough Energy have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to establish Breakthrough Energy Europe (BEE) – a joint investment fund to help innovative European companies develop and bring radically new clean energy technologies to the market.

With this initiative, the Commission takes action to continue leading in the fight against climate change and to deliver on the Paris Agreement – giving a strong signal to capital markets and investors that the global transition to a modern and clean economy is here to stay.

Breakthrough Energy Europe links public funding with long-term risk capital so that clean energy research and innovation can be brought to market faster and more efficiently. With a capitalisation of €100 million, the fund will focus on reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting energy efficiency in the areas of electricity, transport, agriculture, manufacturing, and buildings. It isa pilot project that can serve as a model for similar initiatives in other thematic areas.

Breakthrough Energy Europe is expected to be operational in 2019. Half of the equity will come from Breakthrough Energy and the other half from InnovFin – risk-sharing financial instruments funded through Horizon 2020, the EU’s current research and innovation programme.

Source: European Commission

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