Monthly Archives: enero 2019

Foto cortesía de / Image courtesy of: ContourGlobal.

Wärtsilä has been awarded an integrated 6 MW energy storage project contract for the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) hybrid energy project includes both the hardware, consisting of batteries and inverters, as well as GEMS, the energy management software from Greensmith Energy, a Wärtsilä company. The order with ContourGlobal Bonaire, a subsidiary of London based ContourGlobal, was booked in Q4, 2018.

The energy storage system will enable Bonaire, part of the Netherlands Antilles, to increase its use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In order to integrate more renewable energy and its intermittent nature, the Wärtsilä energy storage solution will provide the grid stability and reliability required for the island. The energy storage solution will also prevent situations where generation from renewable sources would otherwise had to be curtailed.

The project will integrate multiple generation assets including all of the island’s existing power generation assets, energy storage, wind and solar. GEMS software will control the island grid of Bonaire, an island of 19,000 inhabitants. Work on the Wärtsilä EPC project has commenced, and final completion is expected in April 2019.

Greensmith’s GEMS software platform offers the widest range of energy storage applications for optimising energy storage, often integrated with a growing variety of renewable and thermal generation assets.

Source: Wärtsilä

Corporations bought a record amount of clean energy through power purchase agreements, or PPAs, in 2018, shattering the previous record set in 2017. Highlights included a wave of smaller corporate energy buyers aggregating their purchases, and the first corporate clean energy power purchase agreements in markets such as Poland.

BloombergNEF (BNEF) finds in its 1H 2019 Corporate Energy Market Outlook, that some 13.4 GW of clean energy contracts were signed by 121 corporations in 21 different countries in 2018. This was up from 6.1 GW in 2017, and positions companies alongside utilities as the biggest buyers of clean energy globally.

Corporations have signed contracts to purchase over 32 GW of clean power since 2008, an amount comparable to the generation capacity of the Netherlands, with 86% of this activity coming since 2015 and more than 40% in 2018 alone.

More than 60% of the global activity in 2018 occurred in the U.S., where companies signed PPAs to purchase 8.5 GW of clean energy, nearly triple the amount signed in 2017. Mexico and Brazil also saw growth in corporate procurement, rounding out the 9.1 GW of clean energy purchased by companies in the Americas region in 2018.

Facebook spearheaded a contingent of experienced U.S. corporate energy buyers, purchasing over 2.6 GW of renewables globally in 2018, primarily with utilities in regulated U.S. markets through programs known as green tariffs. This was three times that of the next biggest corporate energy buyer, AT&T. ExxonMobil became the first oil major to sign a clean energy PPA for its own operations, purchasing 575 MW of solar and wind in Texas.

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Global corporate PPA volumes. Source: BloombergNEF.

In the U.S. a major feature was the emergence of smaller, first-time corporate clean energy buyers. In 2018, some 34 new companies signed their first clean energy PPAs, making up 31% of total activity in the U.S. These firms are aggregating their electricity demand to reap the economies of scale from larger solar and wind projects. In many cases, they benefit from partnering with a bigger, more experienced buyer, who can offer a stronger balance sheet and expertise on accounting and legal nuances when signing a PPA.

The aggregation model has heralded in a new generation of corporate clean energy buyers. These companies no longer need to tackle the complexities of clean energy procurement alone. They can share risks associated with credit and energy market volatility with their peers.

In the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region, corporations also purchased record volumes of clean energy, inking deals for 2.3 GW and doubling the 1.1 GW signed in 2017. The Nordics were once again the hot spot for activity, with companies attracted to strong wind resources and credit support from government bodies. Aluminium producers Norsk Hydro and Alcoa Corp purchased the most clean energy in Europe in 2018, but the region also saw activity from multinational technology companies such as Facebook, Amazon and Alphabet subsidiary Google.

Several European countries that saw little or no corporate procurement activity in 2017 enjoyed a rise in interest in 2018. Companies signed PPAs for the first time in Poland, and just the second time in Denmark and Finland. There were also new deals signed in the U.K., following a lull after the expiration of a national subsidy program. Several requests for proposals and changes in policy suggest burgeoning new markets in Germany and France as well.

In the Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, still a nascent market for corporate procurement, companies signed a record 2 GW of clean energy PPAs, more than the previous two years combined. Nearly all of this activity occurred in India and Australia, with roughly 1.3 GW and 0.7 GW of clean energy purchased, respectively. Both markets allow companies to buy clean energy at a large scale through offsite PPAs, making them rarities for the region.

Demand still far outstrips supply in the rest of APAC, although recent changes in several markets suggests a major spike in activity is on the horizon. Offsite corporate PPA mechanisms are now available in nine provinces in China, and the imminent passing of a renewable portfolio standard will give over 30,000 large commercial and industrial companies renewable electricity targets. In Japan, the country’s third non-fossil certificate auction saw corporations purchase 21 TWh, tripling the combined activity in the first two auctions. Thirteen companies in Japan have also established 100 renewable electricity targets, more than the rest of APAC combined.

The healthiest signal of continued growth in the global corporate procurement space is the growing alliance of companies establishing clean energy and sustainability commitments. One such campaign, known as the RE100 – consisting of nearly 160 signatories at the end of 2018 that have established 100% renewable electricity targets – has companies domiciled in 23 different markets. Cumulatively, these companies consumed an estimated 189TWh of electricity in 2017, equivalent to Egypt’s electricity consumption.

BNEF estimates these companies will need to purchase an additional 190 TWh of clean electricity in 2030 to meet their RE100 targets. Should this shortfall be met with offsite solar and wind PPAs, it would catalyse an estimated 102 GW of new solar and wind build globally, greater than the size of the U.K.’s power generation fleet in 2017.

Manufacturers and suppliers of charging infrastructure, will be presenting their innovative product portfolios at Hannover Messe. One such company is Mennekes Elektrotechnik GmbH & Co. KG, based in the Sauerland region: “2019 is going to be a very exciting year for us,” says Alfred Vrieling, head of sales at Mennekes.“The American car maker Tesla will be launching its Model 3 on the German market, and we’ll see what happens then.” Vrieling is optimistic about the future, as he contemplates the mobility revolution that is just around the corner: “When electromobility really takes off, we’ll definitely be part of it.” As well as the domestic market, the technology company from Siegen has the whole of Europe in its sights, with Norway, Switzerland, Sweden and the Netherlands currently doing the most to promote electromobility.

But market growth depends on continuing expansion of the infrastructure. As well as developing suitable plugs and connectors, Mennekes has been concentrating for years on the installation and servicing of charging points. “You only make a journey in an electric car if you know it is easy to recharge the battery when you reach your destination,” says Vrieling, who drives an electric car himself, and therefore knows what he is talking about. “Before people will really embrace electric-powered travel, we need to build confidence and ensure greater continuity and availability.” And what we also need as a matter of urgency, argues Vrieling, are “fixed tariffs agreed between providers and operators of charging points.” As he goes on to point out, this will require some form of government legislation to avoid chaos in the future.

Talking of government involvement: the National Platform for Electromobility (NPE) has calculated that we will need 70,000 public charging points and 7,100 fast charging points in Germany by 2020. The Federal government has allocated 300 M€ of funding up until the year 2020 for the expansion of the public charging network to meet growing demand. What is still uncertain is how today’s power grid is going to cope with the rising demand, and how the necessary infrastructure can be made available both in major conurbations and in rural areas.

Once power grids been fully digitized, industry insiders are confident that the market for electromobility will grow rapidly. There is already a demand for intelligent technologies of the kind that firms such as ABB and Phoenix Contact GmbH & Co. KG will be displaying at the upcoming Hannover Messe in April. As more parking space is needed for recharging electric vehicles, real-world charging times will have to be as short as possible. This means that the battery packs of electric cars will need to be charged with a current of up to 500 kW in order to receive a sufficient charge for a range of 100 km within three to five minutes. “We will need sufficient energy to cope with these high charging capacities, and one way of doing this might be to provide local energy storage facilities,” explains Eva von der Weppen, press officer for Phoenix Contact.

This makes it possible to reduce the connected load of the charging park to the minimum required, so that there is always sufficient energy available at motorway service stations, for example. In addition, these charging stations must be able to deliver the high charging capacities to the electric vehicle safely and conveniently. We already offer a viable commercial solution, in the shape of our cooled HPC (High Power Charging) charging cables,” notes von der Weppen. This presupposes (she adds) “that the battery packs in electric cars can take the high charging capacities, and that they have been engineered for a sufficient number of charging cycles to ensure a long service life. Further work is needed to resolve these technical issues.

ABB is also working on the charging infrastructure. At last year’s Hannover Messe, ABB unveiled its Terra High Power charging station, with a charging capacity of up to 350 kW. This is capable of delivering a charge sufficient for a range of 200 km in just eight minutes – which makes the latest top-of-the-range model from ABB ideally suited for use in motorway service areas and filling stations. As a result, this product from ABB is being installed in growing numbers worldwide so that there are already thousands of fast charging stations in operation in 60 countries. This makes ABB one of the world’s leading suppliers of DC charging solutions – charging technologies designed for the electrification not only of cars, but also of buses, trucks, ships, railways and cable cars.

Hannover Messe is the perfect place for ABB and other specialist exhibitors large and small to get talking with customers from all over the world, and thus to drive the mobility revolution fueled by renewable energy.

Source: Hannover Messe

For the first time renewable energy demand in Europe surpasses 500 TWh – or half a billion Guarantees of Origin (GOs), according to ECOHZ and 2018 statistics from the Association of Issuing Bodies (AIB). If the growth trend from the last five years continues, the GO-market will soon surpass one billion Euro.

The current reported volume is 499 TWh, but this is expected to increase by an additional 10 TWh, when unreported German Q4 figures are included. This will push the expected total demand for renewable electricity documented with Guarantees of Origin close to 510 TWh. This represents an impressive 8% increase from 470 TWh in 2017.

Demand for renewable electricity in France grows by 50%

The demand for renewable electricity continuous to show robust growth in Europe’s biggest markets. The Netherlands, France, Switzerland and Italy show record high demand in 2018. The French market demand increased from 21 TWh to 33 TWh in 2018, while Italy sees record demand of 45 TWh compared to 41 TWh last year. Although the final numbers have not been published for Germany yet, they are in line to exceed 100 TWh for the first time.

Record price levels in 2018

Wholesale prices for GOs averaged around 1.30 €/MWh in 2018, while Nordic hydro GOs traded as high as 2.29 €/MWh. This indicates that the market is willing to pay higher prices even though demand did not grow quite as aggressively as in 2017.

With demand for renewable power now exceeding 500 TWh, and forward prices set at around 1.30 €/MWh, the annual value of the market exceeds 650 MEUR. If growth trends continue we can safely predict that this will be a billion Euro market in a few years.

Wind power continues to strengthen its position among buyers

Although hydropower is still the greatest source of renewable electricity, preferences are gradually shifting towards alternative renewable sources, with wind power being “the technology of choice”. As 2018 figures are updated and reported later in 2019, these shifts will likely become more pronounced. These changes in demand may not only reflect changes in customer preferences, but also reflect changes in market availability for different technologies.

The forces behind the demand

Households, organisations and businesses all contribute to the market growth. But the corporate sector is the main driver because more corporations see sustainability as necessary for future competitiveness. Several initiatives exist to support corporate sustainability ambitions. Two notable initiatives are WeMeanBusiness and RE100.

The RE100 initiative now has 161 corporate members that have all publicly pledged to consume 100% renewable energy. Global reporting initiatives like CDP and Greenhouse Gas Protocol are enabling this movement. Also, the EU recently approved a new Renewable Energy Directive (REDII), strengthening the GO system by further embedding it in European legislation.

Source: ECOHZ

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Kincardine-(UK)-Offshore-Wind-Project_Font-COBRA

The engineering and technology group Sener will be involved in a large floating offshore wind farm that Cobra is building 15 km offshore from the Scottish coast of Aberdeen.

Sener ‘s work will range from supervising the manufacture of the floating platforms to analyzing the technical feasibility of assembling the wind turbines, as well as providing technical assistance in monitoring the plant.

Sener’s Renewables Director, Miguel Domingo, stated that “the purpose of this collaboration between Cobra and Sener is to liaise in reducing costs for future floating wind farms, as we consider this option to be the most appropriate for any location with adequate wind and where depth impedes a conventional foundation“.

With a 50 MW rated capacity and fitted with a 2 MW turbine and five other 9.525 MW turbines, the project is expected to be operational by 2020, making it the largest floating offshore wind farm in the world.

Source: Sener

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A combination of high electricity tariffs, falling PV prices and a lack of reliability in the grid is spurring sales of on-site solar to business customers in Sub-Saharan Africa. This is the conclusion of a new report by research company BloombergNEF (BNEF), commissioned by responsAbility Investments AG, assessing the potential of commercial and industrial solar opportunities in the region.

The report entitled “Solar for Businesses in Sub-Saharan Africa” finds that the commercial and industrial (C&I) solar sector in Sub-Saharan Africa is growing not because of regulatory support – as has been the case in many developed economies – but because of economics. On-site solar power is cheaper than the electricity tariffs paid by commercial or industrial clients in 7 out of 15 markets in Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) studied by BNEF.

While the market is still small, it has great potential. An immense energy deficit and crumbling infrastructure makes Sub-Saharan Africa fertile ground for solar. As of November 2018, developers built a record number of 74 MW serving business customers directly, offering them cheaper power than the grid. Kenya, Nigeria, and Ghana installed 15 MW, 20 MW, and 7 MW respectively as of November 2018.

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According to the authors, the financial sector has yet to take on a major role in providing funding for C&I solar systems. So far, most business customers have bought systems for cash, without using third-party finance. There are, however, big opportunities for specialized financiers in the region to do more.

responsAbility-managed funds have financed the off-grid solar sector in Sub-Saharan Africa for five years, focusing primarily on residential customers. The company expects solar to be increasingly deployed on C&I sites, where it often complements diesel power generation.

Electricity outages are commonplace across most of Sub-Saharan Africa. When the grid is out, customers must either shoulder high opportunity costs from lost sales or manufacturing output, or resort to much costlier backup power, usually from diesel. This is where financing solar installations can contribute to climate change mitigation by replacing fossil fuel.

responsAbility, in cooperation with the dedicated climate fund it manages, and the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO), commissioned BNEF to identify and assess potential target markets for C&I solar in Sub-Saharan Africa. Following a desk-based regional study that identified three high-priority markets, BNEF conducted interviews with 36 stakeholders in those markets. Overall, stakeholders are optimistic about the future and BNEF expects 2019 to be a record year for the C&I industry.

Source: BloombergNEF

Global clean energy investment, investment in renewable energy excluding large hydro-electric projects, but including equity-raising by companies in smart grid, digital energy, energy storage and electric vehicles, totaled $332.1 billion in 2018, down 8% on 2017. Last year was the fifth in a row in which investment exceeded the $300 billion mark, according to authoritative figures from BloombergNEF (BNEF).

There were sharp contrasts between clean energy sectors in terms of the change in dollar investment last year. Wind investment rose 3% to $128.6 billion, with offshore wind having its second-highest year. Money committed to smart meter rollouts and electric vehicle company financings also increased.

However, the most striking shifts were in solar. Overall investment in that sector dropped 24% in dollar terms to $130.8 billion, even though there was record new photovoltaic capacity added, breaking 100 GW barrier for the first time. Part of this reduction was due to sharply declining capital costs. BNEF’s global benchmark for the cost of installing a megawatt of photovoltaic capacity fell 12% in 2018 as manufacturers slashed selling prices in the face of a glut of PV modules on the world market.

That surplus was aggravated by a sharp change in policy in China in mid-year. The government acted to cool that country’s solar boom by restricting access for new projects to its feed-in tariff. The result of this, combined with lower unit costs, was that Chinese solar investment plunged 53% to $40.4 billion in 2018.

The biggest solar projects financed included the 800 MW NOORm Midelt PV and solar thermal portfolio in Morocco, at an estimated $2.4 billion, and the 709 MW NLC Tangedco PV plant in India, at a cost of about $500 million. India is one of the countries with the lowest capital costs per megawatt for photovoltaic plants.

Offshore wind was a major recipient of clean energy investment last year, attracting $25.7 billion, up 14% on the previous year. The balance of activity in offshore is tilting. Countries such as the U.K. and Germany pioneered this industry and will remain important, but China is taking over as the biggest market and new locations such as Taiwan and the U.S. East Coast are seeing strong interest from developers. Some of the projects financed were in Europe, led by the 950 MW Moray Firth East array in the North Sea, at an estimated $3.3 billion, but there were also 13 Chinese offshore wind farms starting construction, for a total of some $11.4 billion.

Onshore wind saw $100.8 billion of new asset finance globally last year, up 2%, with the biggest projects reaching go-ahead including the 706 MW Enel Green Power South Africa portfolio, at an estimated $1.4 billion, and the Xcel Rush Creek installation in the U.S., at $1 billion for 600 MW.

Among other renewable energy sectors, investment in biomass and waste-to-energy rose 18% to $6.3 billion, while that in biofuels rallied 47% to $3 billion. Geothermal was up 10% at $1.8 billion, small hydro down 50% at $1.7 billion and marine up 16% at $180 million. Total investment in utility-scale renewable energy projects and small-scale solar systems worldwide was down 13% year-on-year at $256.5 billion, although the gigawatt capacity added increased.

Other categories of investment showed mixed trends in 2018. Corporate research and development spending slipped 6% to $20.9 billion, while government R&D rose 4% to $15 billion. There was a 20% increase in public markets investment in specialist clean energy companies, to $10.5 billion, with the biggest initial public offerings including $1.2 billion for Chinese electric vehicle company NIO, $852 million for Chinese electric car battery maker Contemporary Amperex Technology, and $808 million for French solar developer Neoen.

Global venture capital and private equity investment jumped 127% to $9.2 billion, the highest since 2010. The biggest deals were $1.1 billion of expansion capital for U.S. smart window maker View, and $795 million for Chinese electric vehicle firm Youxia Motors. In fact, there were no fewer than eight VC/PE financings of Chinese EV specialist companies in 2018, totaling some $3.3 billion.

Looking at the 2018 clean energy investment numbers by country, China was again the clear leader, but its total of $100.1 billion was down 32% on 2017’s record figure because of the plunge in the value of solar commitments. Once again, the actions of China are playing a major role in the dynamics of the energy transition, helping to drive down solar costs, grow the offshore wind and EV markets and lift venture capital and private equity investment.”

The U.S. was the second-biggest investing country, at $64.2 billion, up 12%. Developers have been rushing to finance wind and solar projects in order to take advantage of tax credit incentives, before these expire early next decade. There has also been a boom, in both the U.S. and Europe, in the construction of projects benefitting from power purchase agreements signed by big corporations such as Facebook and Google.

Europe saw clean energy investment leap 27% to $74.5 billion, helped by the financing of five offshore wind projects in the billion-dollar-plus category. There was also a sharp recovery in the Spanish solar market, helped by heavily reduced costs, and a continuation of the build-out of large wind farms in Sweden and Norway offering low-cost electricity to industrial consumers.

Other countries and territories investing in excess of $2 billion in clean energy in 2018 were:

• Japan at $27.2 billion, down 16%
• India at $11.1 billion, down 21%
• Germany at $10.5 billion, down 32%
• The U.K. at $10.4 billion, up 1%
• Australia at $9.5 billion, up 6%
• Spain at $7.8 billion, up sevenfold
• Netherlands at $5.6 billion, up 60%
• Sweden at $5.5 billion, up 37%
• France at $5.3 billion, up 7%
• South Korea at $5 billion, up 74%
• South Africa at $4.2 billion, up 40-fold
• Mexico at $3.8 billion, down 38%
• Vietnam at $3.3 billion, up 18-fold
• Denmark at $3.2 billion, up fivefold
• Belgium at $2.9 billion, up fourfold
• Italy at $2.8 billion, up 11%
• Morocco at $2.8 billion, up 13-fold
• Taiwan at $2.4 billion, up 134%
• Ukraine at $2.4 billion, up 15-fold
• Canada at $2.2 billion, down 34%
• Turkey at $2.2 billion, down 5%
• Norway at $2 billion, no change

Source: BloombergNEF

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Vestas has been at the frontier of wind energy for 40 years, introducing market-leading wind energy solutions that have driven the down cost of energy and taken wind energy from niche to mainstream. Today, Vestas introduces the EnVentus wind turbine platform, which represents another significant step forward in the continuous efforts to lower the levelised cost of energy and accelerate the global transition to a more sustainable energy mix.

The EnVentus platform will initially be available in two new variants: the V150-5.6 MW and V162-5.6 MW, together covering low, medium and high wind conditions. Based on advanced modular design, EnVentus supports Vestas’ vision to become the global leader in sustainable energy solutions and provides a wider range of turbine configurations that can better meet evolving customer needs.

EnVentus represents the next generation of wind turbine technology and connects four decades of wind energy innovation with the experience and knowledge represented by Vestas’ 100 GW of installed wind turbine capacity. The new platform demonstrates the benefits of Vestas’ industry-leading investments in R&D and unmatched volume of wind data.

Anders Runevad, Vestas President and CEO, says “EnVentus is a great achievement by everyone at Vestas that allows us to meet customers’ increasing needs for customisation and continuous reduction of the cost of energy. Our relentless focus on delivering industry-leading revenue and profitability the past years has given us the resources to develop a new platform built on our world-class R&D. Following our 2018 order record and 100 GW milestone, EnVentus is another important step in Vestas’ journey to become the global leader in sustainable energy solutions”.

As Vestas’ first platform introduction since 2011, EnVentus combines proven technology and system designs from Vestas’ 2 MW, 4 MW and 9 MW platforms with advanced modularity, building a foundation that reliably and efficiently lowers the cost of energy. The journey towards a modular platform was initiated in 2012 and is expected to create increased scale advantages and opportunities to optimise current and future value chain needs, such as design cycles and transportation.

Anders Vedel, Vestas Chief Technology Officer, says “Vestas has pioneered wind energy since 1979 and by introducing EnVentus and its first two variants, we connect heritage with innovation to underline our technology leadership. With the introduction of a platform built on advanced modularity, we increase our ability to provide customised solutions while ensuring value chain optimisation. I’m incredibly proud of everyone in Vestas who has been part of developing our new platform and variants, once again showing Vestas has the most passionate and innovative minds in the industry”.

The platform’s first two variants: the V162-5.6 MW and V150-5.6 MW will be globally applicable and are added to the wide range of Vestas’ existing 2 MW and 4 MW platform turbines, giving customers an unmatched combination of turbines to harness wind in any specific location. The turbines feature a full-scale converter, capable of meeting complex and differing grid requirements in local markets. The full-scale converter is matched by a permanent magnet generator for maximum system efficiency and balanced by a medium-speed drivetrain.

With a swept area of over 20,000 m2, the V162-5.6 MW offers the largest rotor size in onshore wind to achieve industry-leading energy production. When paired with a high capacity factor, the V162-5.6 MW offers 26 percent higher annual energy production than the V150-4.2 MW, depending on site-specific conditions. It is primarily relevant in low to medium wind conditions, but also has extensive applicability in high average wind speeds depending on site-specific conditions. The first V162-5.6 MW prototype is expected to be installed in mid-2020, with serial production later that year.

The V150-5.6 MW takes our existing 150m rotor and applies it to higher wind speeds and extended market applicability. When combined with its higher generator rating, the tubine increases the annual energy production potential by 30 percent compared to V136-4.2 MW depending on site specific conditions. It is primarily relevant in medium to high wind conditions. The first V150-5.6 MW prototype is expected to be installed in the second half of 2019, while serial production is scheduled for mid-2020.

Initially, the new variants are targeted at the onshore market, but may have offshore applicability.

The name EnVentus combines “energy”, “environment”, “invent” and the latin word for wind “ventus” to encompass our pioneering and innovative heritage within wind energy and aspiration to lead the global transition to a more sustainable energy system.

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The support of electricity generated from solid biomass is the most important stimulation for the development of the biomass power plant market. Whereas biomass subsidisation schemes have recently also experienced positive amendments in Europe, Asian countries are currently reducing this kind of support for the first time. This is one of the results of a new ecoprog market analysis.

In 2018, the number of biomass power plants (BMPPs) increased again by about 300 facilities. Today, there are about 3,800 BMPPs with an installed capacity of around 60 GWel.

Subsidies for renewable energies (RE) are the most important factor driving the BMPP market, especially in Europe. The markets in South and North America as well as in many Asian countries are rather stimulated by fuel availability; however, RE subsidies are an important factor for the development of new capacities in these countries as well.

Some of the European biomass support schemes are more than 20 years old. Therefore, many such systems have been reduced and rather geared towards competitive mechanisms in the past years.

In the last year, this trend slowed down to some extent. Poland, for instance, organised BMPP auctions for the first time in 2018, after the introduction had been awaited for many years. However, these auctions showed very limited success – only one project was approved for subsidies. This is because only few project developers participated. In late 2018, Finland also introduced an auctioning system that could benefit electricity generation from biomass. Ireland passed an auctioning scheme, which should increase the establishment of renewable energies (including biomass) until 2025.

Outside of Europe, the number of countries cutting biomass subsidies increased for the first time in 2018. Thailand, for instance, drastically reduced the feed-in tariff for biomass electricity, from about 14.20 €ct/kWh to 6.30 €ct/kWh. Also, Japan lowered the subsidisation for biomass projects with capacities of over 10 MWel and introduced a cap of 200 MWel per year for additional constructions. Argentina reduced the tendering volume for RE in the annual auctions from 1,200 MWel in 2017 to 400 MWel in 2018.

Attractive subsidisation terms remain in place in China and India, the countries with the strongest growth potentials. In 2018, India additionally introduced a nationwide support scheme for building biomass CHP plants (based on grants for the plant construction).

ecoprog_grafica

From a global perspective, biomass electricity subsidisation continues to promote the market development for the construction of BMPPs.

Until 2027, the worldwide market for BMPPs will thus remain on its dynamic development path. We expect the construction of about 1,900 additional biomass power plants with an installed capacity of around 25 GWel.

About 50% of this growth will be realised in Asia, especially in the two lead markets China and India. Also, North and South America will remain attractive markets for electricity generation from solid biomass, and particularly their lead markets Brazil, Canada and the USA.

In Europe, the overall level of support will continue to decline, in order to reduce high costs and improve ecological aspects. The positive changes of the subsidisation schemes, which were observed in 2018, will not be able to completely compensate this development. In sum, the European market will therefore lose some of its drive.

Source: ecoprog

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Antonio Rodríguez Osuna, Mayor of Merida, and Luis Cid, OPDEnergy’s CEO, presented the details surrounding the PV plant denominated “La Fernandina”, whose construction shall start in the next few weeks in the municipality of Merida.

The PV plant will occupy an area of 100 hectares nearby the motorway of Alange and achieve a total power capacity of 50 MWp. The construction of La Fernandina will last for 9 months and require a total investment of 30 M€.

When in operation and connected to the grid at the end of 2019, La Fernandina will produce enough renewable energy to supply the equivalent of 26,000 households with electricity. According to parameters estimated and released by the Spanish Office for Climate Change (Oficina Española de Cambio Climático – OECC), such production will contribute to avoid the annual emission of 40,000 tons of CO2 into the atmosphere.

During the press conference from the city hall of Merida, the Mayor Antonio Rodríguez Osuna thanked the company for having chosen Mérida “for such important project that supposes a large investment and creation of employment, in addition the activity will generate an important economic return for the city in the future”.

Luis Cid Suárez, the CEO of OPDEnergy, which is specialized developing renewable energy assets in all stages (development, financing, construction and operation & maintenance), has publicly acknowledged the commitment deployed by the local authorities towards the production of renewable energy, “a commitment that made possible the project we are proud to present today”.

According to Cid, the construction of the plant will result in the creation of 200 new jobs at its peak. In addition, during the construction phase, the company will subcontract supporting services from local companies and the local community. In the Spanish Autonomous Community of Extremadura, OPDEnergy developed and built 8 solar photovoltaic plants with a total capacity of 32 MWp throughout its 13 years of activities.

Moreover, the company has projects to develop and invest in 4 new renewable assets in the region, amounting to over 500 MWp of capacity.

300 MWp in Spain in 2019

La Fernandina is one of the seven solar PV assets that OPDEnergy foresees to construct in 2019 in Spain. In total, these assets shall achieve a total capacity of 300 MWp. Therefore, besides the project presented in Merida, the international power company will bring to life 100 MWp in Andalusia – a 50 MWp plant in Puerto Real, Cadiz, and another 50 MWp plant in Alcalá de Guadaira, Sevilla –and 148 MWp in Aragon – through four assets amounting to 61 MWp in Zaragoza and 87 MWp in Teruel.

Outside Spain, the company will develop and construct a substantial amount of renewable energy projects across Mexico, Chile and the US, achieving the construction of a total of 500 MWp by the end of the year. Finally, and in line with its strategic focused on portfolio diversification, the company has under its pipeline the development of 5,000 MW (5 GW).

Source: OPDEnergy

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