Monthly Archives: septiembre 2019

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Uniper SE has awarded Spanish engineering and technology group SENER and German EPC Contractor MMEC Mannesmann GmbH a significant turnkey contract for the natural gas fired, combined heat and power plant (CHP plant) on its existing Power Plant site in Scholven/Gelsenkirchen (Germany).

The contract has been signed on September, 26th 2019 at Uniper’s headquarters in Dusseldorf and has been attended, among others, by Uniper’s Chief Operating Officer, Eckhardt Rümmler, SENER Energy Business Manager, Borja Zárraga, and MMEC Chief Executive Officer, Oliver Apelt.

Among the main components to be supplied by the joint venture are two gas turbine and generator sets, two heat recovery steam generators, a steam turbine and generator set and a direct-fired boiler. In addition, as part of the scope of the contract, SENER and MMEC will be responsible for designing, supplying, installing, testing and commissioning the main components, as well as the associated equipment and services required (electrical equipment, instrumentation and control system, civil works, balance of plant, project management services). It is scheduled that construction works of the new CHP plant will begin already in 2020.

Uniper is an international energy company that generates, trades and markets energy on a large scale, with 11,000 employees in 40 countries and around 34 GW generating capacity.

Source: SENER

Vestas has secured a 168 MW order for a wind park in Mexico. The order derives from a corporate power purchase agreement (PPA) and includes the supply and installation of 42 wind turbines of the 4 MW platform with V150 rotors. The order also includes an Active Output Management 5000 (AOM 5000) service agreement for the operation and maintenance of the wind park over the next five years.

The 73-metre long blades of the Vestas 150m rotors will be locally manufactured in the TPI Composites factory in Matamoros, which provides Vestas with blades for the increasing number of V136 and V150 orders that the company is receiving in Mexico and Latin America. The turbine towers will also be produced by local suppliers.

Vestas pioneered the Mexican wind energy market when it installed the first commercial wind turbine in 1994. Since then, Vestas has accumulated over 2,3 GW of installed capacity or under construction in the country.

Source: Vestas

On 17 April 2019, the European Parliament and Council adopted Regulation (EU) 2019/631 introducing CO2 emission standards for new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles in the EU. This regulation set reduction targets of -15% and -37.5% for the tailpipe CO2 emissions of newly-registered passenger cars for the years 2025 and 2030 respectively. In 2023, the European Commission will review the Regulation, reporting back to the European Parliament and Council on the progress made towards reaching the car CO2 targets. Amongst other things, this ‘mid-term review’ will take stock of the roll-out of charging and refuelling infrastructure for alternatively-powered vehicles, their market uptake, as well as CO2 reductions from the car fleet.

Now, the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) has published the report “Making the Transition to Zero-Emission Mobility“, that tracks the availability of infrastructure and incentives, ahead of the review of the CO2 targets by the European Commission in 2023. According to the report, sales of alternatively-powered passenger cars – including electrically-chargeable, hybrid, fuel cell and natural gas-powered vehicles – will have to pick up strongly if the targets are to be achieved. To stimulate these sales, governments across the EU need to ramp up investments in charging and refuelling infrastructure, and to put in place meaningful purchase incentives for consumers (such as bonus payments and premiums).

ACEA’s report shows that in 2018 there were less than 145,000 charging points for electrically-chargeable vehicles (ECVs) available throughout the entire European Union. Although this is three times more than five years ago, it still falls far short of the at least 2.8 million charging points that will be required by 2030, which translates into a 20-fold increase in the next decade.

But it is not only the overall lack of infrastructure that poses a problem, it is also the huge imbalance in its distribution across the EU. Indeed, four countries covering roughly one quarter of the EU’s total surface area – the Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK – account for more than 75% of all ECV charging points.

In addition, there is a clear link between the market uptake of ECVs and the number of charging points per 100km of road: almost all EU countries with less than 1 charging point per 100 km of road also have an ECV market share of under 1%.

Another major issue is affordability. The new ACEA data shows that the market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles is also directly correlated to a country’s standard of living. All EU member states with an ECV market share that is less than 1% have a GDP per capita below €29,000. That includes many countries in Central and Eastern Europe, but also Greece, Italy and Spain.

Key findings

Market uptake of alternatively-powered cars

  • 2% of all cars sold in 2018 were electrically-chargeable (+1.4 percentage points since 2014).
  • 3.8% of new passenger cars in the EU were hybrid electric last year (+2.4 percentage points over the last five years).
  • 0.4% of all cars sold in 2018 were natural gas-powered (-0.4 percentage points since 2014).
  • Fuel cell vehicles currently account for a negligible share of total EU car sales.

CO2 emissions of new passenger cars

  • In 2017, petrol cars became the most sold type in the EU for the first time since 2009.
  • 2017 also marked the first increase (+0.3%) in CO2 from new cars since records began.
  • 2018 saw an even bigger drop in diesel sales, and a stronger surge in demand for petrol, resulting in a 1.8% increase of new-car CO2 emissions.

Affordability

  • The market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles (ECVs) is directly correlated to a country’s GDP per capita, showing that affordability is a major barrier to consumers.
  • All countries with an ECV market share of less than 1% have a GDP below €29,000, including EU member states in Central and Eastern Europe, but also Spain, Italy and Greece.
  • An ECV share of above 3.5% only occurs in countries with a GDP of more than €42,000.
  • Only 12 EU countries offer bonus payments or premiums to buyers of ECVs. These purchase incentives, and especially their monetary value, differ greatly across the European Union.
  • Expanding the scope to also include tax exemptions and reductions (ie related to acquisition and ownership), four member states do not offer any tax benefits or incentives for ECVs at all.

Infrastructure availability

  • Although there has been a strong growth in the deployment of ECV infrastructure, the total number of charging points available across the EU (144,000) falls far short of what is required.
  • According to conservative estimates by the European Commission, at least 2.8 million charging points will be needed by 2030. That is a 20-fold increase within the next 12 years.
  • Four countries covering 27% of the EU’s total surface area – the Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK – account for 76% of all ECV charging points in the EU.
  • Almost all EU member states with less than 1 charging point per 100 km of road have an ECV market share of under 1%.
  • There were just 47 hydrogen filling stations available across 11 EU countries in 2018.
  • 17 member states did not have a single hydrogen filling station.
  • There are some 3,400 natural gas filling stations in the EU, up 17.5% since 2014.
  • Two-thirds of these filling points are concentrated in two countries (Italy and Germany).

Source: ACEA

Ignacio Galán in a electric Iberdrola car

Iberdrola, a world leading renewable energy company, has further enhanced its sustainable ambitions by becoming the first Spanish company to sign up to The Climate Group´s EV100 initiative.

EV100 is a global initiative bringing together forward-looking companies committed to accelerating the transition to electric vehicles (EVs) and making electric transport the new normal by 2030.

Under the agreement, sealed within the framework of the Climate Week NYC, Iberdrola will fully electrify its vehicle fleet and provide charging for staff across its operations in Spain and UK- where local EV market conditions make this possible- by 2030.

Iberdrola will also aspire towards this objective in Brazil, Mexico and the USA, but this will be reliant on national characteristics and further developments in the wider EV markets in each of these countries. As part of the partnership, Iberdrola will work with The Climate Group to engage key stakeholders in these countries to help overcome barriers.

A fleet of more than fleet of more than 3,500 vehicles across Spain and UK

This initiative will see Iberdrola have a fleet of more than 3,500 vehicles completely electrified in these two countries by 2030.

Light passenger cars and vans are included, as well as off-road vehicles used for windfarms and power line maintenance tasks like SUVs, pickup trucks and man basket cranes.

Iberdrola has already committed to installing up to 16.000 charging points at homes and 9.000 at workplaces in Spain by 2021. Beyond that, the company´s Smart mobility program for customers is increasing in popularity, which includes both the provision of a charging point and a special tariff to charge vehicles with green electricity.

In the UK, ScottishPower was the first energy company to offer and end-to-end EV ownership package for customers. Working with major car retailer Arnold Clark, buyers can purchase or lease an EV of their choice, book a home charging point installation and sign up to a smart 100% renewable electricity tariff as part of the same package.

In the US, Iberdrola´s subsidiary Avangrid just recently announced the expansion of its partnership with Nissan North America, seeking to provide 3.2 M customers and employees across New York, New England and Oregon with a 5,000 $ discount on the purchase of a Nissan LEAF EV. In addition, the company is also delivering a 34 M$ investment in the expansion of EV charging infrastructure across Maine and New York.

Source: Iberdrola

Spanish renewable energy developers, asset owners and Independent Power Producers (IPPs) are missing out on opportunities to engage with international investors and maximise the value of their assets in the primary and secondary markets. This is according to Augusta & Co., a specialist financial adviser to the renewable energy industry, which has managed transactions to an aggregate value of over €10 billion throughout Europe.

In particular, Augusta has highlighted the limitations of an insular approach, whereby Spanish asset owners selling on projects are choosing to engage in bilateral discussions with familiar investors, rather than seeking to broaden the pool of prospective buyers – both domestic and international – via a Structured Sales Process.

These bilateral discussions limit the value that sellers can unlock from their assets, often allowing buyers to take the upper hand and dictate pricing. They are also leaving sellers vulnerable to complexities or weaknesses in the eventual Sales Purchase Agreement with respect to factors such as warranties or financial penalties.

Indeed, Augusta estimates that Spanish IPPs and developers could be missing out on up to 20% of potential asset value as a result of limitations to negotiating power, and inability to fully engage with the international investment community.

Spain is currently a hotspot for European renewable energy, and has recorded a huge amount of deal flow over the past 18 months, demonstrating considerable investor appetite,” said Axel Narváez, Managing Director, Head of Spain, Augusta & Co. “In order to sustain this momentum, however, and for owners to unleash full value from their development and operational projects, the market needs to ensure that it is open to and bringing on board the investors that are the best fit for these assets.

By entering a Structured Sales Process, supported by an advisor with a genuinely international network, developers and IPPs in Spain can mitigate the risks inherent in dealing with a single party, and ensure that they achieve a fair sale value.

For Spanish asset owners, an independently managed Structured Sales Process will bring a broader range of potential investors into play, including institutional investors from Spain and overseas. This will create a more competitive environment in which sellers have greater control over the terms of the sale, and the valuation of their project or portfolio.

By creating – and then narrowing down – a targeted shortlist of investors, advisors can ensure that buyers are sought who have a genuine interest in the asset and are prepared to offer a fair price. In turn, engagement with the wider international investment community will support Spain’s ambitions to more than double its installed asset base and meet its ambitious target of 74% renewable energy generation by 2030.

Source: Augusta & Co.

The energy transition requires more than 10 times solar and 5 times wind power in combination with other technology measures to limit global warming to well below 2°C and meet the targets of the Paris Agreement, according to DNV GL’s latest Energy Transition Outlook: Power Supply and Use report. The report finds that the energy transition is gathering pace more quickly than previously thought but the rate is still too slow to limit global temperatures rising by well below 2°C as set out in the Paris Agreement.

At the projected pace, DNV GL’s forecast indicates a world that is most likely to be 2.4°C warmer at the end of this century than in the immediate pre-industrial period. The technology already exists to curb emissions enough to hit the climate target. What is needed to ensure this happens are far-reaching policy decisions.

DNV GL recommends that the following technology measures are put in place to help close the emissions gap, the difference between the forecasted rate at which our energy system is decarbonizing and the pace we need to reach, to limit global warming to well below 2°C as set out by the Paris Agreement.

This combination of measures includes:

  1. Grow solar power by more than ten times to 5 TW and wind by 5 times to 3TW by 2030, which would meet 50% of the global electricity use per year.
  2. 50-fold increase in production of batteries for the 50 M electric vehicles needed per year by 2030, alongside investments in new technology to store excess electric energy and solutions that allow our electricity grids to cope with the growing influx of solar and wind power.
  3. Create new infrastructure for charging electric vehicles on a large scale.
  4. More than 1.5 MM$ of annual investment needed for the expansion and reinforcement of power grids by 2030, including ultra-high-voltage transmission networks and extensive demand-response solutions to balance variable wind and solar power.
  5. Increase global energy efficiency improvements by 3.5% per year within the next decade.
  6. Green hydrogen to heat buildings and industry, fuel transport and make use of excess renewable energy in the power grid.
  7. For the heavy industry sector: increased electrification of manufacturing processes, including electrical heating. Onsite renewable sources combined with storage solutions.
  8. Heat-pump technologies and improved insulation.
  9. Massive rail expansion both for city commuting and long-distance passenger and cargo transport.
  10. Rapid and wide deployment of carbon capture, utilization and storage installations.

The staggering pace of the energy transition continues. DNV GL’s report forecasts that by 2050 power generation from solar photovoltaic and wind energy will be 36,000 terawatt hours per year, more than 20 times today’s output. Greater China and India will have the largest share of solar energy by mid-century, with a 40% share of global installed PV capacity in China, followed by the Indian Subcontinent at 17%.

Globally, renewable energy will provide almost 80% of the world’s electricity by 2050 according to the report. The electrification will see increasing use of heat pumps, electric arc furnaces and an electric vehicle revolution, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2032 being electric vehicles.

Despite this rapid pace, the energy transition is not fast enough. DNV GL’s forecast indicates that, alarmingly, for a 1.5°C warming limit, the remaining carbon budget will be exhausted as early as 2028, with an overshoot of 770 Gt CO2 in 2050.

The report also demonstrates that the energy transition is affordable, the world will spend an ever-smaller share of GDP on energy. Global expenditure on energy is currently 3.6% of GDP but that will fall to 1.9% by 2050. This is due to the plunging costs of renewables and other efficiencies, allowing for greater investment to accelerate the transition.

DNV GL appeals to all 197 countries that signed the Paris Agreement to raise and realize increased ambitions for their updated Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020. In a snapshot of the first NDCs submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat, 75% currently refer to renewable energy, and 58% to energy efficiency. DNV GL calls on political leaders that both these percentages need to be 100% in the second NDCs.

Public and private sector leaders are being urged to double annual investments in renewable energy to keep the world well below 2°C of warming, says a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) published ahead of the UN Climate Action Summit in New York. With just 11 years left for action to limit the effects of climate change, annual investments of USD 4.3 trillion in the energy sector until 2030 is the world’s most practical and readily available climate solution.

Annual renewable energy investments for the next decade need to double from around USD 330 billion to nearly USD 750 billion per year until 2030.

The findings form part of a new climate investment report by IRENA that highlights how cumulative global energy investments must pivot overwhelmingly towards low-carbon technologies including renewables. More than USD 18.6 trillion of planned fossil-fuel investments by 2050 need to be redirected to hold the line called for by the Paris Agreement and reaffirmed by the recent special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Despite the urgency, current investment patterns show a stark mismatch with the pathway necessary to ensure a climate-safe future. Together, renewable energy and energy efficiency, along with deeper electrification, can deliver 90 per cent of the energy-related emission cuts needed under the Paris Agreement.

It’s possible to limit climate change and meet the world’s growing energy demand by rapidly accelerating the speed at which we deploy renewable energy,” said IRENA’s Director-General Francesco La Camera. “Only an energy transformation driven by renewables will allow us to meet the goals of the UN 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement. Renewables are the only ready and available instrument we have to hold the 1.5°C line over the next 11 years.

In meeting climate goals, we can also boost economic growth and deliver on sustainable development with renewables,” continued Mr. La Camera. “But there is an urgent need to rethink long-term energy investment decisions to ensure they lead us to the sustainable future we need. Doubling investments in renewables offers us a tremendous opportunity to improve health, create jobs, deliver economic opportunity and tackle climate change. No other solution is as plausible.”

Transforming the energy system with renewables offers a more cost-effective path than climate inaction. Every dollar invested in the energy transition will offer returns of up to three to seven times in improved human health, lower climate related expenditure and reduced subsidies.

But accelerating renewable energy deployment requires policies that create an enabling environment to unlock investment and encourage economic development, the new report concludes. IRENA will work closer to the ground, facilitating projects and assisting countries in building attractive investment frameworks for renewables. The Agency will also enhance cooperation with the private sector, international financial institutions and multilateral organisations.

In support of the UN Secretary General’s call for decisive climate action, IRENA has launched a campaign that underpins renewable energy as a practical climate action solution. In co-operation with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Agency’s “Lead the change. It’s possible with renewables” campaign aims to inform about the potential of renewable energy technologies and in turn encourage concrete climate action.

Source: IRENA

As part of the 10th annual World Green Building Week, the World Green Building Council (WorldGBC) has issued a bold new vision for how buildings and infrastructure around the world can reach 40% less embodied carbon emissions by 2030, and achieve 100% net zero emissions buildings by 2050.

Together, building and construction are responsible for 39% of all carbon emissions in the world , with operational emissions (from energy used to heat, cool and light buildings) ac-counting for 28%. The remaining 11% comes from embodied carbon emissions, or ‘upfront’ carbon that is associated with materials and construction processes throughout the whole building lifecycle. WorldGBC’s vision to fully decarbonise the sector requires eliminating both operational and embodied carbon emissions.

The ‘Bringing embodied carbon upfront’ report proposes this ambitious goal alongside solutions to accelerate immediate action by the entire building and construction value chain. The vision is endorsed by representatives from developers and construction companies, financial institutions, city networks and government, as well as industry representatives from concrete, steel and timber and many more including: HeidelbergCement, Skanska, Stora Enso, Google and the Finnish Government.

The report sets out to demystify the challenge of addressing embodied carbon emissions, through breaking down complex terminology and creating a common language to set a con-sensus-built definition for net zero embodied carbon.

Embodied carbon emissions have been overlooked in the past but as shown by milestone research from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), achieving drastic cuts in all carbon emissions over the next decade is critical to keeping global temperature rise to 1.5oC. Addressing upfront carbon is therefore crucial to fighting the climate crisis, as new construction is expected to double the worlds building stock by 2060 causing an increase in the carbon emissions occurring right now. Therefore, the new report is calling for coordinated action from across the sector to dramatically change the way buildings are de-signed, built, used and deconstructed.

WGBC-2WorldGBC presents a clear pathway of actions that designers, investors, manufacturers, government, NGOs and researchers across the whole value chain can take to accelerate decarbonisation, address current market barriers and, develop low carbon alternative solutions for market. However, the report warns that change will not happen unless there is a radical shift in how industry works together to enable a market transformation.

The transition towards mainstream net zero carbon standards requires immediate action to achieve greater awareness, innovation, improved processes to calculate, track and report embodied carbon, voluntary reduction targets from industry and roll out of new legislation at city, national and regional level. Approaches such as maximising the use of existing assets, promoting renovation instead of demolition and seeking new circular business models that reduce reliance on carbon intensive raw materials are also needed. To kick-start cross-sector collaboration, WorldGBC is calling for new national and sectoral roadmaps to be developed, such as those produced in Finland, Norway and Sweden, with strong support from industry and policymakers.

Demonstrating the feasibility of achieving zero carbon goals, the report is supported by case studies of existing best practice across the whole breadth of the building industry.

Businesses involved in design and delivery have already committed to ambitious individual or national decarbonisation strategies. For example, Skanska, a major development and construction group is making strides in enabling projects to be evaluated for full lifecycle impacts.

Materials suppliers are also taking a leading role. HeidelbergCement has committed to developing carbon neutral products by 2050, and Dalmia Bharat Cement, one of India’s leading cement manufacturers, is committed to becoming a carbon negative group by 2040.

Cities have also been instrumental in pushing for new innovations and approaches. Oslo, Norway, has a commitment to fossil free construction sites. Vancouver, Canada, has mandated that embodied carbon be reduced in new buildings by 40% by 2030, as part of its climate emergency response, demonstrating the type of regulatory frameworks that can drive market change.

The report has been generously supported by the European Climate Foundation and the Children’s Investment Fund Foundation. It was delivered in partnership with World Green Building Council’s technical partner Ramboll, and delivery partner C40 Cities Climate Leadership Group.

Source: World Green Building Council (WorldGBC)

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Soltec, the leading Spanish company in the manufacture and supply of single-axis trackers, forecasts supplying up to 3 GW of solar trackers to utility-scale PV plants for the 2019 financial year. This figure would result in Soltec closing the year with a record of almost 8 GW and a turnover of around 300 million dollars that would double the 2018 figure. Around 1,500 employees already form part of the workforce in the different international delegations.

Since it was founded in 2004, this Spanish company has significantly increased its sales year on year to position itself as one of the companies with the largest market share in the PV sector. To date, Soltec has supplied more than 270,000 solar trackers around the world. It became part of the Financial Times FT 1000 listed companies in 2017, as the top-ranked solar power company and fourth placed out of the 31 utilities that are included in this list. In 2018, Soltec invoiced almost 200 million dollars, an amount that it expects to double in 2019. This increase would represent a growth for the company of 100%.

The Murcia-based company already has over one hundred projects around the world and a 15-year track record investing in innovation. Soltec is the leader in Latin American countries such as Brazil, Peru and Colombia. In addition, thanks to its cutting-edge technology, it continues to consolidate its position in the solar power market with revolutionary products such as its SF7 solar tracker and the SF7 Bifacial, whose design has been optimised to achieve an optimal yield from the bifacial modules.
“This year to date, the trend in bifacial technology is becoming key to utility-scale PV projects. Eight out of every ten quote requests are for bifacial, which confirms the commitment of Soltec when the time comes to support innovation and research in bifacial technology”, explains Eduardo de San Nicolás, Product Manager at Soltec.

Optimising bifacial tracking

As part of its commitment and strong support for innovation and the development of proprietary technologies, in 2018 Soltec inaugurated the Bifacial Tracker Evaluation Center (BiTEC) based in Livermore (California). This centre aims to study the performance of the modules and bifacial trackers under a range of albedo conditions, as well as the height, distance between modules and module temperature. In addition, the research into all of these aspects sets out to establish the best Soltec tracker design for the deployment of bifacial modules.

According to the latest results obtained at BiTEC, the SF7 bifacial tracker from Soltec, its star product, offers a bifacial gain of 16.2% in high albedo conditions (around 58%) and 10.1% in medium albedo conditions (29%). BiTEC has also studied the bifacial gain of PV modules deployed in the two most widely-used solar tracker configurations in the market today: one-in-portrait (1P) and two-in portrait (2P). The results obtained confirm that the SF7 bifacial tracker from Soltec, in 2P configuration, achieves a bifacial gain that is 2.1% higher than trackers in 1P configuration.

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Foto cortesía de/Photo courtesy of: GWEC

Europe wind technology contracts in Q2 2019 saw 118 contracts announced, marking a rise of 9% over the last four-quarter average of 108, according to GlobalData’s power industry contracts database.

Onshore was the top category in wind technology in terms of number of contracts for the quarter in Europe, accounting for 80 contracts and a 67.8% share, followed by offshore with 34 contracts and a 28.8% share. Onshore repowered stood in third place with four contracts and a 3.4% share.

The proportion of wind technology contracts by category tracked by GlobalData in the quarter was as follows:

1. Project implementation with 41 contracts and a 34.7% share
2. Supply & erection: 35 contracts and a 29.7% share
3. Power Purchase Agreement: 16 contracts and a 13.6% share
4. Repair, maintenance, upgrade & others: 15 contracts and a 12.7% share
5. Consulting & similar services: seven contracts and a 5.9% share
6. Electricity supply: four contracts and a 3.4% share.

France tops Europe wind power contracts activity

France was the top country in the Europe region for wind technology contracts recorded in Q2 2019 with 28 contracts and a 23.7% share, followed by Germany with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share and the UK with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share.

The top issuers of contracts for the quarter in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

1. Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkey (Turkey): 1,000 MW from two contracts
2. Ministere de la transition ecologique et solidaire (France): 600 MW from one contract
3. Ministere de l’Environnement, de l’Energie et de la Mer (France): 516.5 MW capacity from 21 contracts.

The top winners were:

1. EDF Renewables (France), Enbridge (Canada) and Innogy (Germany): 600 MW.
2. Enercon (Germany) and Enerjisa Enerji (Turkey): 500 MW.
3. Aquila Capital Concepts (Germany): 133.2 MW.

Source: GlobalData

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