Nearly half a million workers must be trained to safely meet expansion of global wind market over next five years

Es necesario formar a casi medio millón de trabajadores para afrontar de forma segura la expansión del mercado eólico mundial durante los próximos cinco años

In 2019, Global Wind Organisation partnered with the Global Wind Energy Council to highlight the importance of safety, training and job creation to power wind energy deployment and the global energy transition. The two organisations have teamed up again with the second edition of their joint report Global Wind Workforce Outlook 2021-2025, in partnership with RCG.

In a new joint report these organizations find that the global wind industry will need to train upwards of 480,000 more people to GWO standards over the next five years to meet global wind power market demand in line with health and safety standards.

These workers will need to be trained to construct, install, operate and maintain the world’s growing onshore and offshore wind fleet, and represents only a fraction of the job opportunities available in the growing wind industry.

Currently, the GWO training market, considered the global standard for wind workforce training, has the capacity to support the training needs of 150,000 workers by the end of 2021 and 200,000 by the end of 2022. But analysis in The Global Wind Workforce Outlook 2021-2025 finds that we will need at least 280,000 more trained workers to install the forecast 490 GW of new wind power capacity coming online over the next five years.

Of the 480,000 GWO trained workers required worldwide, 308,000 will be deployed to construct and maintain onshore wind projects and 172,000 are needed for offshore wind.

Over 70% of the new global workforce training demand will come from the 10 markets analysed in the report, including: Brazil, China, Japan, India, Mexico, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, United States of America, and Vietnam. The markets analysed in the report were selected for regional diversity, as well as spanning the largest onshore wind markets globally, high-growth markets for onshore and offshore wind, and emerging wind markets.

For already large wind markets like the US and China, scaling up training capacity can provide new job opportunities and increase productivity through the recognition of GWO standards. Emerging economies will need to develop their safety and technical training networks from the ground up to ensure alignment with global safety systems to ensure the long-term sustainability of the industry.

Overall, there is significant untapped potential for the training and industrial education supply chain in countries across the world, and organisations in scope to deliver the additional training capacity needed can develop GWO programmes now to meet this future demand.

Source: GWEC