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Today the average car runs on fossil fuels, but growing pressure for climate action, falling battery costs, and concerns about air pollution in cities, has given life to the once “over-priced” and neglected electric vehicle. With many new electric vehicles (EV) now out-performing their fossil-powered counterparts’ capabilities on the road, energy planners are looking to bring innovation to the garage — 95% of a car’s time is spent parked. The result is that with careful planning and the right infrastructure in place, parked and plugged-in EVs could be the battery banks of the future, stabilising electric grids powered by wind and solar energy.

EVs at scale can create vast electricity storage capacity, but if everyone simultaneously charges their cars in the morning or evening, electricity networks can become stressed. The timing of charging is therefore critical. ‘Smart charging’, which both charges vehicles and supports the grid, unlocks a virtuous circle in which renewable energy makes transport cleaner and EVs support larger shares of renewables,” says Dolf Gielen, Director of IRENA’s Innovation and Technology Centre.

Looking at real examples, a new report from IRENA, Innovation Outlook: smart charging for electric vehicles, guides countries on how to exploit the complementarity potential between renewable electricity and EVs. It provides a guideline for policymakers on implementing an energy transition strategy that makes the most out of EVs.

Smart implementation

Smart charging means adapting the charging cycle of EVs to both the conditions of the power system and the needs of vehicle users. By decreasing EV-charging-stress on the grid, smart charging can make electricity systems more flexible for renewable energy integration, and provides a low-carbon electricity option to address the transport sector, all while meeting mobility needs.

The rapid uptake of EVs around the world, means smart charging could save billions of dollars in grid investments needed to meet EV loads in a controlled manner. For example, the distribution system operator in Hamburg — Stromnetz Hamburg — is testing a smart charging system that uses digital technologies that control the charging of vehicles based on systems and customers’ requirements. When fully implemented, this would reduce the need for grid investments in the city due to the load of charging EVs by 90%.

IRENA’s analysis indicates that if most of the passenger vehicles sold from 2040 onwards were electric, more than 1 billion EVs could be on the road by 2050 — up from around 6 million today —dwarfing stationary battery capacity. Projections suggest that in 2050, around 14 TWh of EV batteries could be available to provide grid services, compared to just 9 TWh of stationary batteries.

The implementation of smart charging systems ranges from basic to advanced. The simplest approaches encourage consumers to defer their charging from peak to off-peak periods. More advanced approaches using digital technology, such as direct control mechanisms may in the near future serve the electricity system by delivering close-to real-time energy balancing and ancillary services.

Advanced forms of smart charging

An advanced smart charging approach, called Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G), allows EVs not to just withdraw electricity from the grid, but to also inject electricity back to the grid. V2G technology may create a business case for car owners, via aggregators, to provide ancillary services to the grid. However, to be attractive for car owners, smart charging must satisfy the mobility needs, meaning cars should be charged when needed, at the lowest cost, and owners should possibly be remunerated for providing services to the grid. Policy instruments, such as rebates for the installation of smart charging points as well as time-of-use tariffs, may incentivise a wide deployment of smart charging.

We’ve seen this tested in the UK, Netherlands and Denmark. For example, since 2016, Nissan, Enel and Nuvve have partnered and worked on an energy management solution that allows vehicle owners and energy users to operate as individual energy hubs. Their two pilot projects in Denmark and the UK have allowed owners of Nissan EVs to earn money by sending power to the grid through Enel’s bidirectional chargers.

Perfect solution?

While EVs have a lot to offer towards accelerating variable renewable energy deployment, their uptake also brings technical challenges that need to be overcome.

IRENA analysis suggests uncontrolled and simultaneous charging of EVs could significantly increase congestion in power systems and peak load. Resulting in limitations to increase the share of solar PV and wind in power systems, and the need for additional investment costs in electrical infrastructure in form of replacing and additional cables, transformers, switchgears, etc., respectively.

An increase in autonomous and ‘mobility-as-a-service’ driving — i.e. innovations for car-sharing or those that would allow your car to taxi strangers when you are not using it — could disrupt the potential availability of grid-stabilising plugged-in EVs, as batteries will be connected and available to the grid less often.

Impact of charging according to type

It has also become clear that fast and ultra-fast charging are a priority for the mobility sector, however, slow charging is actually better suited for smart charging, as batteries are connected and available to the grid longer. For slow charging, locating charging infrastructure at home and at the workplace is critical, an aspect to be considered during infrastructure planning. Fast and ultra-fast charging may increase the peak demand stress on local grids. Solutions such as battery swapping, charging stations with buffer storage, and night EV fleet charging, might become necessary, in combination with fast and ultra-fast charging, to avoid high infrastructure investments.

Source: IRENA

Sistema de conversión de potencia de Ingeteam para un proyecto piloto en Dubái, el primer sistema de almacenamiento de energía en EAU acoplado a una planta fotovoltaica a gran escala / Ingeteam's power conversion system (PCS) for a pilot project in Dubai, the first energy storage system paired with a PV plant at a grid-scale level in the UAE. Foto cortesía de /Photo courtesy of: Ingeteam

In a recently published report, Wood Mackenzie projects solar-plus-storage LCOE for both utility-scale and distributed commercial & industrial (C&I) segments to decline considerably over the next five years. As grid resiliency and renewables intermittency continue to be a challenge in Asia Pacific’s power markets, solar-plus-storage could address these issues particularly as solar and battery costs continue to decline.

According to Wood Mackenzie, unsubsidised utility-scale LCOE for a 4-hour lithium-ion solar-plus-storage will command a cost premium between 48% and 123% over solar LCOE in 2019. This will reduce to between 39% and 121% in 2023. By then, solar-plus-storage costs would already be competitive against gas peakers in all the National Electricity Market (NEM) states of Australia. The country’s utility-scale solar-plus-storage LCOE will hover at about 23% above average wholesale electricity price.

Only Thailand is expected to have a utility-scale solar-plus-storage LCOE below the average wholesale electricity price by 2023. While the country does not have a wholesale electricity market, industrial power price taken as a proxy is higher compared to other wholesale markets and hence shows competitive solar-plus-storage economics.

CAPEX subsidies and additional remuneration through different forms of renewables certificate will be crucial for projects to go-ahead.

In general, Wood Mackenzie expects the average solar-plus-storage LCOE in Asia Pacific to decrease 23% from US$133/MWh this year to US$101/MWh in 2023.

On the distributed C&I solar-plus-storage front, the storage premium over solar LCOE is between 56% and 204% this year. In 2023, the cost premium will narrow to between 47% and 167%. The reason for such wide LCOE range is because there are some mature markets where solar cost is extremely competitive while others are not and some in-between. This is due to a mix of labour/ land/ environment/ civil costs, weighted average cost of capital, and procurement methods (tenders vs feed-in tariffs (FIT)). Also, some markets have very well established supply chains with the availability of storage manufacturing.

Unsubsidised C&I solar-plus-storage is expected to be competitive in Australia, India and the Philippines by 2023.

The residential market also poses a great opportunity for solar-plus-storage. In 2018 with the help of government subsidies, Australia’s New South Wales saw a 76% savings on annual electric bills through solar-plus-storage installations. Another attractive residential solar-plus-storage market is Japan. FIT for 600 MW of solar projects is poised to expire this year. As power prices are set to increase, storage retrofits provide an opportunity for home consumers to avoid high residential prices.

Source: Wood Mackenzie

Innolith AG, a world leader in rechargeable inorganic battery technology, has announces that it is developing world’s first 1,000 Wh/kg rechargeable battery. Under development in the company’s German laboratory, the new Innolith Energy Battery would be capable of powering an electric vehicle for over 1,000 km on a single charge. The new Innolith battery would also radically reduce costs due to the avoidance of exotic and expensive materials combined with the very high energy density of the system.

In addition to its range and cost advantages, the Innolith battery will be the first non-flammable lithium-based battery for use in electric vehicles. This battery uses a non-flammable inorganic electrolyte, unlike conventional EV batteries that use a flammable organic electrolyte. The switch to non-flammable batteries removes the primary cause of battery fires that have beset the manufacturers of EVs.

Innolith will be bringing the Energy Battery to market via an initial pilot production in Germany, followed by licensing partnerships with major battery and automotive companies. Development and commercialisation of the Innolith Energy Battery is anticipated to take between three and five years.

Innolith has used an innovative approach in the chemistry of its battery to generate the high energy density seen in each cell. Conversion reaction materials offer a new and promising route to high-energy-density battery cells as they overcome the poor performance of traditional intercalation-based materials. This new approach will enable batteries to reach cell-level energy content values that have never been possible before.

This new breakthrough has been made possible by years of dedicated research into all aspects of inorganic electrolytes and their application to rechargeable batteries,” comments Innolith Chairman, Alan Greenshields. “Simply put, the experience gained in how to build high power batteries with exceptional robustness and cycle life has proved to be the right basis for building high energy products too. The absence of organic materials, a key aspect of Innolith’s battery technology, removes the critical source of safety risk and chemical instability of high energy batteries”.

Innolith has patents pending for the key inventions of the Energy Battery and is also maintaining commercial confidentiality on the cell chemistry mechanism. Under all licensing agreements for the Energy Battery, Innolith will retain control of all specialty chemical supply in order to protect its intellectual property.

Innolith has already proven the breakthrough character of non-flammable, inorganic rechargeable batteries with its first product, a Grid-Scale Power Battery that is used today in the PJM grid in the US to provide fast frequency regulation services. The chemistry used in this battery has been proven to operate for more than 55,000 full depth of discharge cycles, which is between 10 and 100 times the maximum number of cycles of existing Li-ion batteries in use today.

Source: Innolith

The global battery energy storage market is forecast to grow to US$13.13bn by 2023. According to GlobalData, the Asia Pacific (APAC) and EMEA regions will be the dominant markets for battery energy storage systems over the forecast period 2019-2023. The company’s latest report ‘Battery Energy Storage Market, Update 2019 – Global Market Size, Competitive Landscape and Key Country Analysis to 2023’ reveals that the fall in technology prices and increasing pace of development in the power market are the primary driving factors for the battery energy storage market.

APAC will continue to be the largest market reaching US$6.05bn in 2023, as countries are increasing investments for improving their grid infrastructure and improving the market structure to attract foreign investments. As regards technology, lithium-ion is and will continue to be, the preferred technology for market deployment.

The US has been the largest market for Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) both in terms of cumulative installed capacity and by market value for projects installed up to 2018 and is likely to continue to lead the market at country level. The US market for battery energy storage is estimated to reach US$2.96bn in 2023, accounting for 23% of the global market.

Asia Pacific was the largest BESS market in 2018, accounting for 45% of the global market installed capacity and the region is also expected to maintain its top position in the forecast period. With the number of grid-connected renewable electricity generation plants increasing tremendously, countries such as China, India, Japan, South Korea and the Philippines will focus on frequency regulation in the electric grid to normalise the variation in power generation from renewables.

The EMEA battery energy storage market registered a market value of approximately US$1.73bn in 2018, accounting for 26% of the global market. The region has a strong demand for flexibility, due to technological advancements, evolving market conditions, strong research facilities and supportive policies. The Middle East and Africa are small markets with demand for storage expected to increase once renewable power generation gains significant traction in the market.

The battery energy storage market in the Americas registered a market value of approximately US$1.97bn in 2018, accounting for 28% in 2018. This region’s market is growing, with countries such as the US, Chile, Canada and Brazil promoting battery storage installations across consumer segments. Some US states have robust incentive programs, most notably California, which adopted an ambitious target for 1.3 GW of energy storage by 2020, which it has already surpassed with a new target awaiting approval.

With countries aggressively promoting the modernisation of grids and developing their capability to handle present and future demands, batteries are being deployed to support smart grids, integrate renewables, create responsive electricity markets, provide ancillary services and enhance both system resilience and energy self-sufficiency. Given this situation, the BESS market, which is estimated at 4.9 GW in 2018, is forecast to reach 22.2 GW by 2023.

Market conditions are improving and more companies are moving towards decentralised generation, leading to an increase in the on-site deployment of renewables and batteries, as well as in micro- or mini-grids. Supportive policies and high electricity charges are also nudging the market towards renewables and/or storage plus renewables at end consumer level.

As the power sector evolves to accommodate new technologies and adapt to varying market trends, energy storage will play a central role in the transition and transformation of the power sector.

Rolls-Royce and ABB have announced a global partnership on microgrid technology and advanced automation. Together the two companies will offer an innovative, energy-efficient microgrid solution for utilities, commercial and industrial entities. A microgrid is a small scale electric grid that combines power from distributed energy generation sources such as combined heat and power plants, diesel- and gas-powered gensets and renewable sources with batteries. The microgrid provides the overall control to coordinate these resources to meet the requirements of industrial, residential or consumer loads. Microgrids can either function off-grid, or connected to the main power grid. The ability of microgrids to seamlessly separate themselves from the main grid, in the event of a potential grid fault or emergency, is an in-creasingly important feature.

Reliable power supply – even during harsh weather conditions and times of peak consumption – is critical for economic growth. Integrating renewable energy is a sustainable solution to support uninterrupted power as well as encourage clean energy use. Microgrid solutions benefit utilities, industries and commercial sites that are looking for reliable power supply as well as cost and carbon emission reduction.

Microgrids enable resilient power supply even with high penetration of intermittent renewable energy sources like wind and solar. Digital automation and control systems intelligently coordinate distributed energy resources and loads for the microgrid to function efficiently.

Rolls-Royce offers the MTU Onsite Energy brand power system solutions: from mission critical, standby and continuous power to combined generation of heat and power, and microgrids. “Due to the transformation towards decarbonization, customers need to pursue sustainable power options that also deliver utmost profitability. For this, we rely primarily on microgrids, which are autonomous energy supply systems that are efficient, reliable, and environmentally friendly,” said Andreas Schell, CEO, Rolls-Royce Power Systems.“Combining our integrated MTU diesel and gas genset system technology and our control solutions, with ABB’s modular microgrid solution, control capability and remote service, will offer customers the combined strengths of the two world leaders in technology.

ABB Ability™ e-mesh™ can ensure a stable power grid, even with a high share of renewable energy from various sources, working smoothly together with already installed gas or diesel engines,” said Massimo Danieli, head of ABB’s grid automation business line within the company’s Power Grids business. “ABB has a vast number of microgrid installations globally and through our partnership with Rolls-Royce Power Systems, we will further support the growing interest for microgrid solutions globally.

The ABB Ability™ e-mesh™ solution will provide power generation asset owners a vertically integrated, unified view of their distributed energy resources and renewable power generation that is quick to deploy and that reduce operational costs. Cloud operations, site and fleet optimization, weather and load forecast and machine learning algorithms offer infinite insights for decision-making, such as knowing where to increase investments on maintenance or how to increase revenue streams to operate assets more profitable.

Source: ABB y Rolls-Royce

CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel have signed an agreement for the joint development and industrialization of energy converters for organic redox flow batteries. The aim of both partners is to support electric mobility through the development of the charging infrastructure and offer the energy sector a sustainable and highly cost-efficient storage technology for a successful energy transition.

From the idea to the laboratory, then series production

The business idea for redox flow batteries with organic electrolytes derived from lignin (‘Organic Flow’) was already conceived in 2011 and since 2014, CMBlu has carried out intensive research and development. These batteries essentially consist of two tanks of liquid electrolyte and an energy converter, which consists of a large number of adjacent rows of cells and is therefore also referred to as a battery stack. The liquids are pumped through the battery stacks and is charged or discharged as required.

The technology developed by CMBlu has now reached the prototype stage. The further development and industrialization of the battery stack is regulated in the long-term cooperation agreement with Mann+Hummel. For this purpose Mann+Hummel has created a spin-off named i2M, which is dedicated to the development and commercialization of innovative technologies. In the next step Mann+Hummel will build a complete production line in an European plant. CMBlu will realize special pilot projects with reference customers in the next two years. Starting in 2021, CMBlu plans to market the first commercial systems.

Benefits of organic flow batteries

Similar to the principle of conventional redox flow batteries, CMBlu’s organic flow batteries store electrical energy in aqueous solutions of organic chemical compounds derived from lignin that are pumped through the energy converter, i.e. battery stack. The special feature of the flow batteries is that the capacity and electrical output can be scaled independently. The number of stacks defines the output of the batteries. A higher number of stacks multiplies the output. The capacity of the battery is only limited by the size of the tanks. This allows flexible customization to take into account the respective application area. For example, solar power can be stored for several hours and then fed into the grid at night.

In order to achieve cost-effective mass production, the most important components in the stack were adjusted to the organic electrolyte. In this process, almost the entire value chain for the stacks can be supplied locally. There is no dependency on imports from other countries. In addition, the battery stacks do not require rare-earth metals or heavy metals. The aqueous electrolytes in the system are not combustible or explosive and can be used safely.

Variety of applications in the grid

Organic flow batteries are suitable for numerous application areas in the power grid such as the intermediate storage of power from renewable energy generation or in connection with the balancing of demand peaks in industrial companies. An additional application area is the charging infrastructure required for electric mobility. The batteries enable a buffer storage to relieve power grids which do not have to be upgraded for additional loads. It enables simultaneous fast charging of electric vehicles. Ultimately, a decentralized charging network for electric vehicles will only be possible in connection with a high performance and scalable energy storage system.

Nature as a model for energy storage

The concept is based on the mode of energy in the human body. In the citric acid cycle the body also uses a redox reaction of organic molecules. CMBlu has now succeeded in applying this principle to large-scale storage of electrical energy. For this purpose the company use the mostly unused resource of lignin, which is readily available in unlimited quantities and accrues in amounts of millions of tons annually in the pulp and paper industry. CMBlu’s technology enables a very large and cost effective energy storage system. The battery stack is the core of the system and requires the highest quality and process reliability in the production process.

The manufacture of electrolytes includes a number of filtration steps, which Mann+Hummel performs using new special membranes. This technology further expands its product range and at the same time contributes to build the infractruture needed for electric vehicles.

Source: CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel

Ingeteam and BYD have tested and certified at their respective R&D laboratories the compatibility of BYD’s high voltage Battery-Box H 5.1 and 6.4, and Ingeteam’s INGECON® SUN STORAGE 1Play hybrid solar-plus-storage inverter.

The coupling of Ingeteam’s inverter and BYD’s batteries is a complete hybrid system to capture and maximize the use of the solar resource. The versatility of the Ingeteam hybrid inverter in combination with BYD’s HV battery, permits to operate in stand-alone mode, back-up (UPS) mode or self-consumption mode. Thus, on-grid systems can store the solar energy during the day to consume it at night without risk of a power outage in case of a grid blackout, prioritizing the maximum self-consumption ratio at the same time.

During the certification process, BYD implemented a new battery capacity calibration system to improve the measuring and control of the state of charge of the battery. This newest feature was also implemented and certified within the Ingeteam inverter.

BYD’s LiFePO4 high voltage battery, with its 5.1 kWh and 6.4 kWh of capacity -depending on the model-, has been conceived for residential and commercial use, storing the electric energy and optimizing the installation’s energy efficiency thanks to the stabilization of the power supplied.

For its part, the Ingeteam hybrid inverter makes it possible to connect a PV array and a battery bank to the same unit, thereby reducing the cost of the system as a whole. This is a 3 or 6 kW single-phase transformerless inverter, to address residential and commercial installations.

Source: Ingeteam

LCOE global de referencia: fotovoltaica, eólica y baterías. Fuente BNEF. / Global LCOE benchmarks – PV, wind and batteries. Source: BloombergNEF.

Two technologies that were immature and expensive only a few years ago but are now at the center of the unfolding low-carbon energy transition have seen spectacular gains in cost-competitiveness in the last year. The latest analysis by research company BloombergNEF (BNEF) shows that the benchmark LCOE for lithium-ion batteries has fallen 35% to $187 per megawatt-hour since the first half of 2018. Meanwhile, the benchmark LCOE for offshore wind has tumbled by 24%.

Onshore wind and photovoltaic solar have also gotten cheaper, their respective benchmark LCOE reaching $50 and $57 per megawatt-hour for projects starting construction in early 2019, down 10% and 18% on the equivalent figures of a year ago.

BNEF’s analysis shows that the LCOE per megawatt-hour for onshore wind, solar PV and offshore wind have fallen by 49%, 84% and 56% respectively since 2010. That for lithium-ion battery storage has dropped by 76% since 2012, based on recent project costs and historical battery pack prices. Looking back over this decade, there have been staggering improvements in the cost-competitiveness of these low-carbon options, thanks to technology innovation, economies of scale, stiff price competition and manufacturing experience.

The most striking finding in this LCOE Update, for the first-half of 2019, is on the cost improvements in lithium-ion batteries. These are opening up new opportunities for them to balance a renewables-heavy generation mix. Batteries co-located with solar or wind projects are starting to compete, in many markets and without subsidy, with coal- and gas-fired generation for the provision of ‘dispatchable power’ that can be delivered whenever the grid needs it (as opposed to only when the wind is blowing, or the sun is shining).

Electricity demand is subject to pronounced peaks and lows inter-day. Meeting the peaks has previously been the preserve of technologies such as open-cycle gas turbines and gas reciprocating engines, but these are now facing competition from batteries with anything from one to four hours of energy storage, according to the report.

Offshore wind has often been seen as a relatively expensive generation option compared to onshore wind or solar PV. However, auction programs for new capacity, combined with much larger turbines, have produced sharp reductions in capital costs, taking BNEF’s global benchmark for this technology below $100 per MWh, compared to more than $220 just five years ago.

Although the LCOE of solar PV has fallen 18% in the last year, the great majority of that decline happened in the third quarter of 2018, when a shift in Chinese policy caused there to be a huge global supply glut of modules, rather than over the most recent months.

Source: BloombergNEF

Sistema de conversión de potencia de Ingeteam para un proyecto piloto en Dubái, el primer sistema de almacenamiento de energía en EAU acoplado a una planta fotovoltaica a gran escala / Ingeteam's power conversion system (PCS) for a pilot project in Dubai, the first energy storage system paired with a PV plant at a grid-scale level in the UAE. Foto cortesía de /Photo courtesy of: Ingeteam

Amplex-Emirates LLC was awarded a pilot project by Dubai’s Electricity & Water Authority (DEWA) to install a battery energy storage system (BESS) at the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai; the first energy storage system paired with a photovoltaic plant at a grid-scale level in the United Arab Emirates. NGK Insulators LTD supplied its NAS batteries and Ingeteam was responsible for the supply of a 1.2 MW power conversion system (PCS) with its medium voltage components (power transformer, MV switchgear, etc.), and the power plant controller (PPC).

Dubai has accelerated investment in renewable energy to eliminate dependence on fossil fuels and for sustainable economic growth, and is building the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the world’s largest solar park, in the south of the Emirate. Dubai is targeting introduction of 5,000 MW of solar  PV and CSP by 2030, which will raise the ratio of renewable energy to 25% of total generation capacity. Furthermore, Dubai is seeking a 75% power output from clean energy sources by 2050.

In anticipation of the large-scale introduction of renewable energy in the future, DEWA installed a NAS battery system in the solar park to demonstrate its effectiveness in stabilizing grid fluctuations caused by the nature of renewable energy. The 1.2 MW/7.2 MWh NAS storage system is allowing DEWA for evaluating the technical and economic capabilities of this technology when integrated with PV arrays in order to increase grid stability and reduce CO2 emissions. In fact, the storage system will be also used for energy time shifting, frequency control and voltage control by using the large capacity of the batteries. This kind of hybrid systems help to deliver clean and reliable power to energy consumers with a greater availability and cost-effectiveness.

The Ingeteam supply was comprised of a 1.2 MVA power station equipped with two storage inverters and all the rest of components for a LV-to-MV and DC-to-AC conversion (medium voltage transformer, medium voltage switchgear, etc.). These inverters have been conceived to perform according to the most demanding international grid codes, featuring some very advanced operating functions such as black start capability. Moreover, they are suitable for both stand-alone and grid-tied systems. Also, Ingeteam supplied the Power Plant Controller (PPC) and the BMS interface control that manages the operation of the overall system, developing the more advanced control features, such as:

  • Energy Time Shifting. This control mode enables an advanced power generation planning, making the power plant’s production profile unmatch the consumption profile, allowing electric utilities to address daily peak demand that falls outside periods of solar generation.
  • Predictable PV+BESS production: The BESS is connected in the boundary of the PV plant and receives the real-time PV production. The power station automatically changes the active power according to the PV production variations to ensure a PV+BESS predictable power production in the common point of connection at the Syhaslm- 33/11kV substation.
  • Fast Frequency Regulation. The system adjusts the power production depending on the frequency variations.
  • Voltage Droop Control. According to an established droop gain, the system selects the necessary reactive power at the point of connection, depending on the existing voltage difference.

Source: Ingeteam

Foto cortesía de / Image courtesy of: ContourGlobal.

Wärtsilä has been awarded an integrated 6 MW energy storage project contract for the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) hybrid energy project includes both the hardware, consisting of batteries and inverters, as well as GEMS, the energy management software from Greensmith Energy, a Wärtsilä company. The order with ContourGlobal Bonaire, a subsidiary of London based ContourGlobal, was booked in Q4, 2018.

The energy storage system will enable Bonaire, part of the Netherlands Antilles, to increase its use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In order to integrate more renewable energy and its intermittent nature, the Wärtsilä energy storage solution will provide the grid stability and reliability required for the island. The energy storage solution will also prevent situations where generation from renewable sources would otherwise had to be curtailed.

The project will integrate multiple generation assets including all of the island’s existing power generation assets, energy storage, wind and solar. GEMS software will control the island grid of Bonaire, an island of 19,000 inhabitants. Work on the Wärtsilä EPC project has commenced, and final completion is expected in April 2019.

Greensmith’s GEMS software platform offers the widest range of energy storage applications for optimising energy storage, often integrated with a growing variety of renewable and thermal generation assets.

Source: Wärtsilä

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