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Innolith AG, a world leader in rechargeable inorganic battery technology, has announces that it is developing world’s first 1,000 Wh/kg rechargeable battery. Under development in the company’s German laboratory, the new Innolith Energy Battery would be capable of powering an electric vehicle for over 1,000 km on a single charge. The new Innolith battery would also radically reduce costs due to the avoidance of exotic and expensive materials combined with the very high energy density of the system.

In addition to its range and cost advantages, the Innolith battery will be the first non-flammable lithium-based battery for use in electric vehicles. This battery uses a non-flammable inorganic electrolyte, unlike conventional EV batteries that use a flammable organic electrolyte. The switch to non-flammable batteries removes the primary cause of battery fires that have beset the manufacturers of EVs.

Innolith will be bringing the Energy Battery to market via an initial pilot production in Germany, followed by licensing partnerships with major battery and automotive companies. Development and commercialisation of the Innolith Energy Battery is anticipated to take between three and five years.

Innolith has used an innovative approach in the chemistry of its battery to generate the high energy density seen in each cell. Conversion reaction materials offer a new and promising route to high-energy-density battery cells as they overcome the poor performance of traditional intercalation-based materials. This new approach will enable batteries to reach cell-level energy content values that have never been possible before.

This new breakthrough has been made possible by years of dedicated research into all aspects of inorganic electrolytes and their application to rechargeable batteries,” comments Innolith Chairman, Alan Greenshields. “Simply put, the experience gained in how to build high power batteries with exceptional robustness and cycle life has proved to be the right basis for building high energy products too. The absence of organic materials, a key aspect of Innolith’s battery technology, removes the critical source of safety risk and chemical instability of high energy batteries”.

Innolith has patents pending for the key inventions of the Energy Battery and is also maintaining commercial confidentiality on the cell chemistry mechanism. Under all licensing agreements for the Energy Battery, Innolith will retain control of all specialty chemical supply in order to protect its intellectual property.

Innolith has already proven the breakthrough character of non-flammable, inorganic rechargeable batteries with its first product, a Grid-Scale Power Battery that is used today in the PJM grid in the US to provide fast frequency regulation services. The chemistry used in this battery has been proven to operate for more than 55,000 full depth of discharge cycles, which is between 10 and 100 times the maximum number of cycles of existing Li-ion batteries in use today.

Source: Innolith

The global battery energy storage market is forecast to grow to US$13.13bn by 2023. According to GlobalData, the Asia Pacific (APAC) and EMEA regions will be the dominant markets for battery energy storage systems over the forecast period 2019-2023. The company’s latest report ‘Battery Energy Storage Market, Update 2019 – Global Market Size, Competitive Landscape and Key Country Analysis to 2023’ reveals that the fall in technology prices and increasing pace of development in the power market are the primary driving factors for the battery energy storage market.

APAC will continue to be the largest market reaching US$6.05bn in 2023, as countries are increasing investments for improving their grid infrastructure and improving the market structure to attract foreign investments. As regards technology, lithium-ion is and will continue to be, the preferred technology for market deployment.

The US has been the largest market for Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) both in terms of cumulative installed capacity and by market value for projects installed up to 2018 and is likely to continue to lead the market at country level. The US market for battery energy storage is estimated to reach US$2.96bn in 2023, accounting for 23% of the global market.

Asia Pacific was the largest BESS market in 2018, accounting for 45% of the global market installed capacity and the region is also expected to maintain its top position in the forecast period. With the number of grid-connected renewable electricity generation plants increasing tremendously, countries such as China, India, Japan, South Korea and the Philippines will focus on frequency regulation in the electric grid to normalise the variation in power generation from renewables.

The EMEA battery energy storage market registered a market value of approximately US$1.73bn in 2018, accounting for 26% of the global market. The region has a strong demand for flexibility, due to technological advancements, evolving market conditions, strong research facilities and supportive policies. The Middle East and Africa are small markets with demand for storage expected to increase once renewable power generation gains significant traction in the market.

The battery energy storage market in the Americas registered a market value of approximately US$1.97bn in 2018, accounting for 28% in 2018. This region’s market is growing, with countries such as the US, Chile, Canada and Brazil promoting battery storage installations across consumer segments. Some US states have robust incentive programs, most notably California, which adopted an ambitious target for 1.3 GW of energy storage by 2020, which it has already surpassed with a new target awaiting approval.

With countries aggressively promoting the modernisation of grids and developing their capability to handle present and future demands, batteries are being deployed to support smart grids, integrate renewables, create responsive electricity markets, provide ancillary services and enhance both system resilience and energy self-sufficiency. Given this situation, the BESS market, which is estimated at 4.9 GW in 2018, is forecast to reach 22.2 GW by 2023.

Market conditions are improving and more companies are moving towards decentralised generation, leading to an increase in the on-site deployment of renewables and batteries, as well as in micro- or mini-grids. Supportive policies and high electricity charges are also nudging the market towards renewables and/or storage plus renewables at end consumer level.

As the power sector evolves to accommodate new technologies and adapt to varying market trends, energy storage will play a central role in the transition and transformation of the power sector.

Ingeteam and BYD have tested and certified at their respective R&D laboratories the compatibility of BYD’s high voltage Battery-Box H 5.1 and 6.4, and Ingeteam’s INGECON® SUN STORAGE 1Play hybrid solar-plus-storage inverter.

The coupling of Ingeteam’s inverter and BYD’s batteries is a complete hybrid system to capture and maximize the use of the solar resource. The versatility of the Ingeteam hybrid inverter in combination with BYD’s HV battery, permits to operate in stand-alone mode, back-up (UPS) mode or self-consumption mode. Thus, on-grid systems can store the solar energy during the day to consume it at night without risk of a power outage in case of a grid blackout, prioritizing the maximum self-consumption ratio at the same time.

During the certification process, BYD implemented a new battery capacity calibration system to improve the measuring and control of the state of charge of the battery. This newest feature was also implemented and certified within the Ingeteam inverter.

BYD’s LiFePO4 high voltage battery, with its 5.1 kWh and 6.4 kWh of capacity -depending on the model-, has been conceived for residential and commercial use, storing the electric energy and optimizing the installation’s energy efficiency thanks to the stabilization of the power supplied.

For its part, the Ingeteam hybrid inverter makes it possible to connect a PV array and a battery bank to the same unit, thereby reducing the cost of the system as a whole. This is a 3 or 6 kW single-phase transformerless inverter, to address residential and commercial installations.

Source: Ingeteam

LCOE global de referencia: fotovoltaica, eólica y baterías. Fuente BNEF. / Global LCOE benchmarks – PV, wind and batteries. Source: BloombergNEF.

Two technologies that were immature and expensive only a few years ago but are now at the center of the unfolding low-carbon energy transition have seen spectacular gains in cost-competitiveness in the last year. The latest analysis by research company BloombergNEF (BNEF) shows that the benchmark LCOE for lithium-ion batteries has fallen 35% to $187 per megawatt-hour since the first half of 2018. Meanwhile, the benchmark LCOE for offshore wind has tumbled by 24%.

Onshore wind and photovoltaic solar have also gotten cheaper, their respective benchmark LCOE reaching $50 and $57 per megawatt-hour for projects starting construction in early 2019, down 10% and 18% on the equivalent figures of a year ago.

BNEF’s analysis shows that the LCOE per megawatt-hour for onshore wind, solar PV and offshore wind have fallen by 49%, 84% and 56% respectively since 2010. That for lithium-ion battery storage has dropped by 76% since 2012, based on recent project costs and historical battery pack prices. Looking back over this decade, there have been staggering improvements in the cost-competitiveness of these low-carbon options, thanks to technology innovation, economies of scale, stiff price competition and manufacturing experience.

The most striking finding in this LCOE Update, for the first-half of 2019, is on the cost improvements in lithium-ion batteries. These are opening up new opportunities for them to balance a renewables-heavy generation mix. Batteries co-located with solar or wind projects are starting to compete, in many markets and without subsidy, with coal- and gas-fired generation for the provision of ‘dispatchable power’ that can be delivered whenever the grid needs it (as opposed to only when the wind is blowing, or the sun is shining).

Electricity demand is subject to pronounced peaks and lows inter-day. Meeting the peaks has previously been the preserve of technologies such as open-cycle gas turbines and gas reciprocating engines, but these are now facing competition from batteries with anything from one to four hours of energy storage, according to the report.

Offshore wind has often been seen as a relatively expensive generation option compared to onshore wind or solar PV. However, auction programs for new capacity, combined with much larger turbines, have produced sharp reductions in capital costs, taking BNEF’s global benchmark for this technology below $100 per MWh, compared to more than $220 just five years ago.

Although the LCOE of solar PV has fallen 18% in the last year, the great majority of that decline happened in the third quarter of 2018, when a shift in Chinese policy caused there to be a huge global supply glut of modules, rather than over the most recent months.

Source: BloombergNEF

Daimler Buses’ and Akasol’s long-term cooperation for the development and mass-production of battery systems for the electric bus eCitaro is going from strength to strength. In autumn, serial production of the first-generation battery system Akasystem OEM will begin in Langen (Hesse, Germany) as planned. Meanwhile, Akasol is starting to develop second-generation lithium-ion battery systems in close cooperation with Daimler Buses. These will offer about 35 percent more energy and contribute to an improved range in 2020.

Instead of currently 25 kWh storage capacity per battery pack, the second generation will be able to store 33 kWh per battery pack. This means an increase of 35 percent from 243 to 330 kWh per vehicle while maintaining the same constructed space, weight and upwards compatibility. This is made possible thanks to the unique, flexible system architecture that Akasol offers its clients. According to Daimler Buses this technology leap, in conjunction with other factors, contributes to an increase of the vehicle’s range to approximately 200 km (SORT2 cycles, medium traffic) and up to 250 km when operating under ideal circumstances.

The lithium-ion battery systems of both generations are able to charge rapidly (at up to 300 kW) and supply energy to additional units such as air conditioning and electrical systems. The key factor for providing robustness and durability is Akasol’s efficient water-cooling which guarantees stable tempering at 25 ºC and allows battery-run buses to operate in all climates. The high-performance battery systems are partly mounted on the roof, partly in the rear.

Akasol has developed and distributed a variety of battery systems for electric and hybrid electric buses for many years. In addition to EvoBus, one of Akasol’s clients of series produced battery systems for buses, buses using Akasol’s innovative battery technology are in daily operation in London, Berlin, Cologne and Braunschweig amongst others.

Source: Akasol

The number of electric vehicles (EVs) worldwide is growing rapidly and BP is working across the supply chain to support the development of the technologies and infrastructure required to support that growth. BP believes that ultra-fast charging will be key in accelerating the adoption of EVs worldwide.

Ultra-fast charging is at the heart of BP’s electrification strategy. StoreDot’s technology shows real potential for car batteries that can charge in the same time it takes to fill a gas tank.

StoreDot has developed a lithium ion-based battery technology which enables ultra-fast charging for the mobile and industrial markets. Using this technology, StoreDot is also developing a new type of electric car battery that will aim to achieve a charging experience that is comparable to the time spent to refuel a traditional car. StoreDot currently expects first sales of its flash batteries for mobile devices as early as 2019.

BP is committed to a lower carbon future, aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its operations, improve its products and services to help customers lower their emissions, and create new low carbon businesses. BP’s work on advanced mobility and developing fast and convenient EV charging networks, including venturing investments in both StoreDot and Freewire Technologies, supports customers who aim to reduce their emissions through EVs.

Source: BP

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Es la batería de ión-litio más grande utilizada en una aplicación industrial en Australia hasta la fecha

Kokam Co., Ltd, provider of innovative battery solutions, has announced that it has successfully deployed for Alinta Energy, a leading Australian utility, a 30 MW/11.4 MWh Energy Storage System (ESS), the largest lithium ion battery deployed for industrial application in Australia. The ESS features Kokam’s high power Lithium Nickel Manganese Cobalt (NMC) Oxide battery technology, and is being used to improve the performance of an islanded high voltage network, which supplies power to major iron ore producers in the Pilbara region of Western Australia.

Hybrid natural gas/battery system increases islanded microgrid’s reliability, efficiency, sustainability

Operational since April 2018, the ESS consists of five 2.2 MWh Kokam Containerized ESS (KCE) units using Kokam Ultra High Power Lithium-ion NMC (UHP NMC) batteries. The ESS, in conjunction with Alinta Energy’s existing 178 MW open cycle gas turbine Newman Power Station, serves as a hybrid natural gas/battery energy generation and storage system. This hybrid system, along with a 220 kV high voltage power transmission system and high voltage substations, form an islanded microgrid that is used to power iron ore mines.

In addition to delivering Alinta Energy the ESS used for the project, Kokam, in partnership with EPC contractor UGL Pty Ltd, also served as the system integrator on the energy storage project. Kokam contracted ABB Australia to supply the ABB PowerStore™ “Virtual Generator” used to manage the microgrid. Adding the ESS to the microgrid will improve Alinta Energy’s ability to reliably deliver energy to the region’s iron ore producers.

Alinta Energy’s hybrid natural gas/energy storage system and islanded microgrid demonstrate how innovative technologies, combined with intelligent design, can improve power reliability for industrial customers, while also providing efficiency and sustainability benefits,” said Ike Hong, vice president of Kokam’s Power Solutions Division. “The Alinta Energy Newman Battery Storage Project provides an example of how new high power energy storage technologies enable both utility and industrial customers to build hybrid natural gas/battery systems that increase energy reliability, lower greenhouse gas emissions, and boost their bottom lines.

Growing utility, industrial market opportunities for UHP NMC battery technology

The Alinta Energy project provides an example of the growing number of utility and industrial market opportunities for Kokam’s UHP NMC battery technology. Designed for high-power energy storage applications, the UHP NMC battery technology can be used by utilities and other energy services companies for spinning reserve, frequency regulation, wind or large solar power system ramp rate control, Uninterrupted Power Supply (UPS), voltage support and other applications that require large amounts of power to be dispatched in seconds or less. In addition, the technology’s ability to quickly receive and dispatch very large amounts of power make it particularly well suited to be combined with natural gas, diesel and other power systems used to generate energy for industrial applications, where even a brief power disruption that shuts down mining, off-shore drilling or other industrial operations can result in costs totaling hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars.

Kokam’s UHP NMC battery technology cost-effectively and reliably delivers the high power needed for these utility and industrial applications, thanks to the technology’s:

High discharge rate: UHP NMC battery technology has a max discharge rate of 10C, compared 3C for competitors. This enables UHPNMC batteries to dispatch more power when needed.
High energy density: The UHP NMC battery technology’s high energy density enables up to 3.77 MWh of energy storage to be installed in a 40 foot container, compared to 3 MWh of energy storage for standard NMC batteries, allowing more energy to be stored in a smaller space.
Long cycle life: UHP NMC batteries can last up to 10,000 cycles, compared to 3,000 – 5,000 cycles for standard NMC technologies, increasing the energy storage system’s expected life.
Improved heat dissipation: With a heat dissipation rate that is 1.6 times better than standard NMC technologies, UHP NMC batteries can be used at a higher rate for longer periods of time with no degradation in battery life or performance.

Source: Kokam

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Saft’s New Uptimax nickel-technology battery provides operators with a direct replacement for lead-acid batteries in industrial standby installations. It is ideally suited for mission critical applications where reliable backup power is essential, such as oil and gas exploration and production, as well as for utilities and manufacturing plants. With the New Uptimax, Saft is targeting the industrial standby battery market valued at an estimated €3 billion per year [*].

Nickel-technology batteries have significant advantages over lead-acid technology in terms of reliability, calendar life, Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) and predictable performance with no risk of ‘sudden death’.

Mikael Greis, Saft Product Manager said, “The New Uptimax is perfect for operators who want to upgrade from lead-acid to nickel-technology batteries as it eliminates the need to modify their existing charging systems. It is also ideally suited to very demanding backup applications, especially in the Middle East, due to its ability to tolerate extreme temperatures”.

The New Uptimax battery is a direct replacement for lead-acid batteries because it is compatible with all commonly used DC (Direct Current) charging systems and operates in a narrow voltage window, with no need for a boost charge. This reduces the cost of charging systems as there is less need for components such as dropping diodes or DC/DC converters. It also has a fast charging capability that can achieve 95 percent State of Charge in eight hours for a fast return to service after a power failure.

Further benefits of the New Uptimax battery include maintenance-free operation with no need for topping up with water throughout the entire service life and compliance with all relevant safety standards. It is also ideal for applications in the Middle East as it offers a long operational life of over 20 years at +25°C and can tolerate extreme temperatures (- 40°C to + 70°C) for short periods.

The New Uptimax battery is designed to form the heart of Uninterruptible Power Supply and backup power systems that operate in the event of a loss of the main power supply to facilitate the safe shutdown of processes, safeguard computer data and provide a bridge to standby power. Typical applications will include substation switchgear, process control systems, emergency lighting, fire alarms and security systems.

Saft manufactures the New Uptimax batteries in Oskarshamn, Sweden.

For around ten years, MAN Truck & Bus has been working on inno-vative concepts for supplying and removing material in the urban environment. Cities increasingly find themselves faced with the challenge of reconciling a healthy climate and their inhabitants’ quality-of-life demands with the transport of goods and deliveries in central urban areas. This problem involves developing ideas for re-ducing traffic at specific times and relocating it out of the city alto-gether, new approaches to the use of land, plus new transport and drive concepts. In view of this situation, MAN Truck & Bus has put forward a wide variety of ideas and studies from the truck and bus sectors in recent years. Advancing these ideas consistently, the sales of MAN’s first fully electric-powered production vehicle are now underway with the eTGE.

Around 70 percent of light commercial vehicles used in urban areas travel fewer than 100 kilometres per day on average. The average speed reached during this is low. With this in mind, the vehicle’s theoretical range of up to 160 kilometres covers about three-quarters of all urban-core transport. Sooner or later, as with mobile phones, it will be completely normal to plug a fully electric vehicle in to charge for the coming day – usually overnight.

Charging times vary. A 40 kW charging station fills a battery up to 80 percent in 45 minutes. The MAN eTGE can be restored to full opera-tional capacity after just under five and a half hours on an alternat-ing current wallbox. Approximately nine hours are needed for a full charge with 220V AC. With the relevant battery maintenance, the 36 kWh rechargeable battery only loses around 15 percent of its ca-pacity after ten years and around 2,000 charging cycles. Especially since individual modules of six or twelve cells can be replaced sepa-rately. The modules are located under the slightly higher load floor, as used for rear-wheel drive body versions with diesel engines.

The choice made for the electric front-wheel drive TGE was a per-manently excited synchronous motor with 100 kW maximum availa-ble power. It has 290 Nm of torque at its immediate disposal, which can also be used over the entire speed range, ensuring highly agile handling. Combined with the maximum speed of 90 km/h, this re-sults in fuel consumption of around 20 kWh per 100 kilometres.

In addition to the carrying capacity, the assistance systems have al-so remained unaffected by the electric technology. The eTGE comes with a comprehensive range of built-in standard equipment, includ-ing a navigation system, heated windscreen and other features that help to make driving easier and safer. Naturally, as with all TGEs, the emergency brake assist (EBA) continues to be installed as standard.

In the initial phase of the roll-out, the MAN eTGE can be ordered with the standard wheelbase and high roof. The product line is pri-marily aimed at fleet customers with a tailored service concept to tend to their needs. Initial customer enquiries and signed sales con-tracts have already been made for the MAN eTGE, which costs around €69,500. The first electric-powered vans from MAN are to be used for the first time in metropolitan areas of Germany, Austria, Belgium, France, Norway and the Netherlands.

The battery is the heart of an electric vehicle. Using a battery in an eBus means that the battery has to handle a great deal, from the high mileage of the vehicles to the daily charging cycles and high performance requirements. As a result, the capacity of the batteries decreases over the course of a vehicle’s life, and at some point, the required range can no longer be achieved – MAN expects the batteries used in our eBuses to last at least six years. Given the long service life of an average city bus of 12 years, the batteries would have to be replaced but still be able to manage a certain capacity.

The question is what to do with the batteries. Disposing of them directly is neither ecologically nor economically sound. For this reason, VHH and MAN Truck & Bus want to jointly test the second life of these batteries in a stationary storage facility, as they expressed in a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) signed on 16 March 2018 in Munich.

This second life storage, as it is known, is designed to prevent power consumption peaks during bus charging (peak shaving) by filling up on charge during quieter periods, which the buses can then use at peak times. This saves costs and stabilises utilisation of the power grid, which is the intention of the participants. Further insights are expected on the aging behaviour of the batteries, the life cycles of future batteries and battery technologies, as well as opportunities to stabilise the electricity grid through use of electric transport. The prototype of the stationary storage facility is to start operating in Hamburg-Bergedorf during the course of the year. This involves working with used batteries obtained from vehicle testing, with cells of the type that will also be used in MAN’s eBuses.

This project underlines our aspiration to provide our customers with a complete range of electrification solutions for their fleet,” emphasised Florian Hondele, Project Manager at MAN Transport Solutions. The MAN Transport Solutions team of consultants has been supporting transport companies and freight forwarders since last year in all matters relating to the transition to alternative drive systems and, in particular, electric vehicles.

The joint testing of second life storage is part of the innovation partnership between MAN Truck & Bus and VHH. “Switching to electric transport means much more than just the purchase of electric buses. The testing of the second life energy storage unit fits in perfectly with our holistic strategy,” said Toralf Müller, Managing Director of VHH.

The research is part of the transport partnership between the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg and the Volkswagen Group, which also includes MAN. Together, the partners are working on innovative solutions to make urban transport more environmentally friendly, safer, more reliable and more efficient. One area of focus here is promoting electric-powered vehicles, which should result in fewer emissions and less noise in the city. As part of the partnership with the city, around 150 electrified Volkswagen vehicles are already on the streets of Hamburg. From the end of 2018, MAN electric buses will transport Hamburg’s residents through the city.

“We are about to make crucial strides in the development of vehicle batteries. And we want to play an important role as a vehicle manufacturer,” says Felix Kybart, Head of Alternative Drives at MAN Truck & Bus, on the occasion of the signing of the contract. And this does not end with the delivery of the vehicles – it also includes the secondary use of batteries and recycling.

Vekehrsbetriebe Hamburg-Holstein GmbH (VHH), headquartered in Hamburg, transports more than 100 million passengers per year, employing 1,600 people from 60 nations. Their fleet includes 527 buses. VHH is investing in the future with the switch to electric transport. Two electric buses have been in regular use since 2014. More eBuses have been ordered. An electric bus workshop is under construction and will open in summer 2018.

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