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biomass

Portada-Sep_Curtis-Texeiro_-FuturEnergy_Julio19

The Curtis-Teixeiro biomass plant is one the most important renewable energy projects in Europe. Greenalia will invest €135 million in the plant and the construction work is being carried out by a joint venture made up of Acciona Industrial and Imasa Ingeniería y Proyectos. Under the terms of the EPC contract, the consortium will be responsible for the O&M of the plant over a period of 15 years. The Curtis Teixeiro biomass plant is being built on a 103,000 m2 site and will have a capacity of 50 MW when fully operational, enough energy to supply a population of over 250,000. Once completed, this pioneer in terms of technological innovation will be the largest forest biomass facility in the Iberian Peninsula and Southern Europe, using pruning and eucalyptus wood waste.

Once commissioned, the plant will generate 324 GWh per annum and will have the capacity to treat 500,000 tonnes of forest biomass. This waste will be supplied by group subsidiary Greenalia Forest, which will collect it from FSC or PEFC certified forests within a radius of 100 km from the plant.

The plant features the latest biomass power generation technologies and complies with the most stringent European legislation. This is a highly efficient power generation facility, with low CO2 emissions. It uses dry cooling technology, which means minimal water consumption and no effluent discharges. Construction work is scheduled for completion in September and the plant is expected to come online in the first quarter of 2020.

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Foundation of a wind turbine

GES, an integral supplier of engineering, construction and maintenance for renewable energy projects (wind, solar and hydroelectric) will build the Valdejalón wind portfolio consisting of 5 wind farms in Aragón, Spain. Once completed, the wind farms will have a total installed capacity of 231 MW. Construction is expected to be finalized in 2020 second quarter.

The project is divided into two phases: Valdejalón East which includes the wind farms El Cabezo (49 MW) and Portillo II Phase I (45.6 MW) and Phase II (38 MW), and Valdejalón West composed of Virgen de Rodanas I (49.4 MW) and Virgen de Rodanas II (49.4 MW).

The Valdejalón portfolio is fully owned by the Danish fund manager Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners P/S (CIP) through its fund Copenhagen Infrastructure III K/S (CI-III). CIP is a fund management company focused on energy infrastructure including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar PV, biomass and energy-from-waste, transmission and distribution, and other energy assets like reserve capacity and storage. The company operates in Europe, North America and Southeast Asia.

GES is responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction of the project. The company is already working in the detail engineering, and will be in charge of the complete BOP (Balance of Plant), both the civil work, with more than 60 km of roads and 61 foundations and platforms for the 85 m wind turbines to be installed in the park; and the electrical work, including the underground medium voltage network with more than 55 km of trenches and the 132 kV evacuation line of almost another 50 km, which will connect the two new substations to an existing interconnection substation.

The EU’s largest National Promotional Banks and Institutions and the European Investment Bank launch a 10 M€ initiative to accelerate the transition to a sustainable and circular economy

Five European national promotional banks & institutions and the European Investment Bank (EIB) launched today in Luxembourg the Joint Initiative on Circular Economy to support the development and implementation of circular economy projects and programmes in the European Union (EU). This flagship partnership will target at least 10 M€ of investments over the next five years (2019 – 2023). The aim is to prevent and eliminate waste, increase resource efficiency and foster innovation by promoting circularity in all sectors of the economy.

The five national promotional banks & institutions are:

  • Bank Gospodarstwa Krajowego (BGK – Poland)
  • Groupe Caisse des Dépôts (CDC – France) including Bpifrance
  • Cassa Depositi e Prestiti (CDP – Italy)
  • Instituto de Crédito Oficial (ICO – Spain)
  • Kreditanstalt für Wiederaufbau (KfW – Germany)

The six partner institutions will combine their expertise, experience and financial capacity to better support the implementation of viable circular projects and programme approaches. The Joint Initiative on Circular Economy (JICE) will provide loans, equity investment or guarantees to eligible projects and develop innovative financing structures for public and private infrastructure, municipalities, private enterprises of different size as well as for research and innovation projects. JICE builds on the ongoing initiatives led by the European Commission to build knowledge through dedicated working groups and develop financing schemes.

The joint initiative will focus particularly on investments in the EU Member States that will help accelerate the transition to a circular economy. It will target all stages of the value chain and lifecycle of products and services:

  • Circular design and production: applying “reduce and recycle” strategies to design out waste at the source, prior to commercialisation.
  • Circular use and life extension: enabling the reuse, repair, repurposing, refurbishing or remanufacturing of products in use phase
  • Circular value recovery: recovering materials and other resources from waste, recovering waste heat and/or reusing treated wastewater
  • Circular support: facilitating circular strategies in all lifecycle phases, for example with the deployment of key ICT technologies, digitalization and services supporting circular business models and circular value chains.

Project examples:
To illustrate the type of projects eligible under the Joint Initiative for Circular Economy, here are some examples of projects already financed by the six partner institutions.

BGK (Poland)

PKP SKM in Tricity: PKP SKM in Tricity is the local railway carrier, operating on the very important railway line no. 250, connecting Tricity metropolitan area (Gdansk, Gdynia and Sopot) in the north of Poland. In 2012 BGK issued for this company bonds worth 235.400 € with 9 years to maturity. The funds obtained by the company were used as the own contribution to investment in refurbishment of 22 electric multiple units, which allowed to extend their lifetime by another 20 years.

Sklejka Orzechowo: BGK signed a 5.178.664 € investment loan for a new production line for plywood and blockboard production and for related infrastructure. The new production technology and resource loops to be introduced as part of the investment will result in sewage reduction, more efficient biomass use, reduced water consumption, heat recovery and reduced noise emission.

CDC (France)

PHENIX: Bpifrance, via its Smart Cities VC fund, co-led a 15 M€ financing round in PHENIX. The capital raised is used to accelerate growth throughout Europe, invest in the development of new digital services, including the launch of B2C mobile app (‘Phenix app’), and expand towards the management of other waste streams.
BDT – Terradona (France): CDC (Banque des Territoires), together with other public and private institutions, has financed the fundraising of the green-tech company Terradona, creator of Cliiink®, smart and eco-responsible solution for waste sorting. Proposed to local authorities, the innovative Cliiink® solution reduces the cost of treating their waste and improves the cleanliness of their agglomerations, while rewarding good sorters and boosting local trade.

CDP (Italy):

Ex Sadoch (Trieste): The urban regeneration project has concerned the retrofitting of a building complex with over 8,900 m2 that once housed the Saul Sadoch paper factory, a complex, built in 1957 and left unused since the 1990s. Besides the buildings, the project has also allowed the renovation and redevelopment of the surrounding formerly industrial area, which for a long time represented a space of abandonment and degradation. The project was carried out by the FVG Social Housing Fund, in which CDP Investimenti SGR has invested over 60 M€ through “Fondo Investimenti per l’Abitare” (FIA), real estate fund dedicated to social housing.

Ex Manifattura Tabacchi (Milan): A comprehensive retrofitting project of 90,000 m2 of abandoned public estate on a former industrial site, aimed at regaining a semi-central urban plot located close to the Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca. The project is being led by an SPV of which 50% of shares are held by CDP Immobiliare and in which CDP invested over 40 M€ to redevelop Edificio2.

EIB (EU-wide)

Novamont Renewable Chemistry: Novamont develops innovative bioplastics and biochemicals based on renewable resources, which are biodegradable and compostable. Novamont’s holistic approach and vision for the bioeconomy, where the business model includes local agriculture as well as the reuse of by-products, is producing positive results for material innovation.

De Lage Landen (DLL) Circularity Loan for SMEs and Midcaps: DLL refurbishes and leases second and third life equipment to companies. The DLL engagement will allow SMEs to save costs and invest in other areas while strongly contributing to the realisation of the circular economy objectives.

KfW (Germany)

Circular use of process heat: Traditional Bakery Müller Egerer had it production processes scrutinised by an energy consultant. KfW provided a promotional loan of 0,9 M€ and the company benefitted from a redemption grant of 150,000 €.

Instituto de Crédito Oficial (ICO – Spain)

Red de Calor de Soria – Biomass District Heating: Leading district heating project in Soria, Spain, wich using woodchip residue from local wood industry as fuel. The project supplies heat and water to more than 16,000 inhabitants and 8,000 homes. Total investment adds up to 20 M€ and ICO participates in a relevant proportion in equity through the FondICO Infrastructures fund. The amount of renewable energy supplied is around 80 GWh/year, saving CO2 emissions for more than 28.000 Tm/year, using local fuel and creating local jobs.

Recycling sea waste: Ecoalf is a circular economy start-up in Spain that collects marine debris from the bottom of the sea, treats it, and converts it into thread to make clothes and accessories. Its goal was to design the first generation of fashion items created with recycled materials that would have the same technical properties as the best non-recycled products, and be of equal quality and design, showing that continuing to misuse the planet’s natural resources indiscriminately is unnecessary.

Source: EIB

Bosch is to be fully climate-neutral as early as next year. This will make Bosch the first major industrial enterprise to achieve this goal. In a bid to swiftly achieve carbon neutrality, Bosch will buy more green electricity in the near term and compensate for unavoidable CO2 emissions with carbon offsets. In the years to 2030, the company will gradually increase the share of renewable energy in the power that it generates and buys, and will invest a billion euros to boost its loca-tions’ energy efficiency.

Once Bosch achieves climate neutrality, it will no longer adversely affect carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. The company is thus making an impor-tant contribution to the Paris climate agreement ratified in 2015, which calls for global warming to be kept well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

A selection of exemplary Bosch projects

The Feuerbach plant – energy efficient thanks to people and machinery
Established in 1909, it has steadily and systematically modernized its facilities to contribute to the company’s overall energy efficiency.
Thanks to sessions that train and raise awareness in their team, energy require-ments are down more than 50% compared with 2007; its carbon emissions – re-lative to value creation – are down 47%.

Crunching data to conserve energy at Homburg

The Bosch location at Homburg, in the German state of Saarland, is edging ever closer to the vision of an energy efficient, self-learning plant. It has spared the world around 5,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide in the past two years and more than 23,000 tons since 2007.
Green roofs, photovoltaic systems, and carbon neutrality at Renningen
In Renningen, it has been carbon neutral since January 2019. Carbon offsets fully compensate for the carbon footprint of the natural gas burned by its heating system. The facility buys green electricity to cover its power needs.

Sustainable heating at Rodez

Reduce the site’s carbon footprint – that was what the team at Rodez in France set out to do when it started making plans as far back as 2009. The location now has a biomass heating plant, up and running since 2013. It burns wood chips ob-tained from local certified sustainable forestry resources.
Reducing the carbon footprint at Bidadi and Nashik, India, with power generated on site
Bosch India is pursuing carbon neutrality by tapping locally available, natural sources of energy. Spurred on by the idea of supplying the location with fully renewable power during daytime hours, the team at the Nashik location began installing its first photovoltaic systems in 2015.

Renewables as the main source of power for Bosch in Mexico

Mexico has revamped its energy policy. An energy reform launched there calls for the country to source 35 percent of the electricity from non-fossil fuels by 2024. With many hours of sunshine annually and high-wind regions, Mexico’s geography and climate would certainly support that goal, providing a solid foun-dation for change alongside committed support from government and business. Bosch Mexico was able to save 56,000 metric tons of CO2 in 2018 by switching to predominantly renewable energies.

Source: Bosch

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The Spanish Bioenergy Association (Avebiom) and the Fundación Circe are participating in the European AgroBioHeat project, which seeks to extend the use of agro-biomass (straw, agricultural prunings, olive pits, almond shells, energy crops, etc.) heating in the European Union.

Avebiom and Circe are addressing the challenge with a view to changing the current model, in which agro-biomass is very underused despite being a resource of great potential. The AgroBioHeat project seeks to promote initiatives in which biomass installers, boiler manufacturers, agro-industries, associations, municipal councils and other institutions can become involved. For this purpose, Avebiom and Circe will identify, accompany and advise companies and entities in the undertaking of two specific projects in Spain.

Identifying initiatives

“Avebiom has the responsibility of identifying initiatives of interest in Spain and trying to ensure that they are successful in order to promote the use of agro-biomass”, points out the association’s project leader, Pablo Rodero. “We will accompany these initiatives until the end of the project and help them to overcome barriers and solve any technical issues or doubts that might emerge”, he added.

Daniel García, a researcher at the Fundación Circe, explains that AgroBioHeat has multiple lines of action. “It is necessary to promote the technologies capable of using agro-biomass with guarantees at trade fairs and other events. We have to put potential developers into contact with facilities that are already up and running and we have to convince the general public that this biomass is as eco-friendly and can be used as safely as forest biomass”, he points out.

Both Rodero and García highlight the fact that the project seeks to address an imminent threat that could limit the use of biomass. They point out that the current Eco-design Regulation, which comes into force in January 2020, imposes very stringent limits on emissions from wood pellet and wood chip boilers of less than 500 kW. And it is expected that a review of the Eco-design Regulation in 2021 will extend these emission limits to other types of biomass.

Avebiom and Circe will undertake a process to select the technologies and facilities to be used for testing and measurement purposes, as well as the new agro-biomass initiatives they wish to promote.

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The support of electricity generated from solid biomass is the most important stimulation for the development of the biomass power plant market. Whereas biomass subsidisation schemes have recently also experienced positive amendments in Europe, Asian countries are currently reducing this kind of support for the first time. This is one of the results of a new ecoprog market analysis.

In 2018, the number of biomass power plants (BMPPs) increased again by about 300 facilities. Today, there are about 3,800 BMPPs with an installed capacity of around 60 GWel.

Subsidies for renewable energies (RE) are the most important factor driving the BMPP market, especially in Europe. The markets in South and North America as well as in many Asian countries are rather stimulated by fuel availability; however, RE subsidies are an important factor for the development of new capacities in these countries as well.

Some of the European biomass support schemes are more than 20 years old. Therefore, many such systems have been reduced and rather geared towards competitive mechanisms in the past years.

In the last year, this trend slowed down to some extent. Poland, for instance, organised BMPP auctions for the first time in 2018, after the introduction had been awaited for many years. However, these auctions showed very limited success – only one project was approved for subsidies. This is because only few project developers participated. In late 2018, Finland also introduced an auctioning system that could benefit electricity generation from biomass. Ireland passed an auctioning scheme, which should increase the establishment of renewable energies (including biomass) until 2025.

Outside of Europe, the number of countries cutting biomass subsidies increased for the first time in 2018. Thailand, for instance, drastically reduced the feed-in tariff for biomass electricity, from about 14.20 €ct/kWh to 6.30 €ct/kWh. Also, Japan lowered the subsidisation for biomass projects with capacities of over 10 MWel and introduced a cap of 200 MWel per year for additional constructions. Argentina reduced the tendering volume for RE in the annual auctions from 1,200 MWel in 2017 to 400 MWel in 2018.

Attractive subsidisation terms remain in place in China and India, the countries with the strongest growth potentials. In 2018, India additionally introduced a nationwide support scheme for building biomass CHP plants (based on grants for the plant construction).

ecoprog_grafica

From a global perspective, biomass electricity subsidisation continues to promote the market development for the construction of BMPPs.

Until 2027, the worldwide market for BMPPs will thus remain on its dynamic development path. We expect the construction of about 1,900 additional biomass power plants with an installed capacity of around 25 GWel.

About 50% of this growth will be realised in Asia, especially in the two lead markets China and India. Also, North and South America will remain attractive markets for electricity generation from solid biomass, and particularly their lead markets Brazil, Canada and the USA.

In Europe, the overall level of support will continue to decline, in order to reduce high costs and improve ecological aspects. The positive changes of the subsidisation schemes, which were observed in 2018, will not be able to completely compensate this development. In sum, the European market will therefore lose some of its drive.

Source: ecoprog

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Clean energy investment was US$61.1bn in Q1 2018, down 10% year-on-year however there were pockets of strength. Developing countries were prominent in clean energy investment in the first three months of 2018, with China once again accounting for more than 40% of the world total, along with eye-catching projects reaching financial close in Morocco, Vietnam, Indonesia and Mexico.

The latest quarterly figures from Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) show global clean energy investment at US$61.1bn in Q1 2018, down 10% on the same period last year.

The quarter to the end of March saw solar investment slip 19% to US$37.4bn, affected both by weaker activity in some markets and by lower unit prices for PV systems. BNEF estimates that benchmark global dollar capital costs per MW for utility-scale solar PV have fallen 7% in the last year.

BNEF expects the world to install even more solar in 2018 than last year’s record of 98 GW. Two of the main drivers are the ongoing boom in China for both utility-scale and smaller, local PV systems, and the financing of very large solar parks in other developing countries as cost-competitiveness continues to improve.

The biggest solar project reaching financial close in the early months of 2018 was the 800 MW Noor Midelt complex in Morocco, made up of a mix of PV panels and solar thermal systems with storage. Development banks including KfW of Germany and the European Investment Bank have agreed to fund the complex, which is likely to cost around US$2.4bn.

The largest conventional PV installations financed in Q1 were the 709 MW NLC Tangedco solar project in India, at an estimated US$660m, and the 404 MW Acciona and Tuto Energy Puerto Libertad project in Mexico, at US$493m.

Wind investment showed a rise of 10% in Q1 to US$18.9bn, while biomass and waste-to-energy declined 29% to US$679m. Geothermal rose 39% to US$1bn and small hydro-electric projects of less than 50 MW attracted US$538m, down 32%. Companies specialising in energy-smart technologies such as smart meters, energy storage and electric vehicles attracted US$2bn, down 8%. Biofuels staged a recovery, with investment up 519% year-on-year to US$748m, thanks to the financing of two US ethanol plants.

Looking at the geographical split, China dominated yet again, investing US$26bn in clean energy in Q1, although this was down 27% from a hectic first quarter last year. The US saw investment of US$10.7bn, up 16%, while Europe suffered a 17% decline to US$6bn, reflecting an absence of German and UK offshore wind deals. India saw investment rise 9% year-on-year to US$3.6bn, while Japanese outlays fell 54% to US$1.4bn.

Country highlights included Vietnam, where the financing of wind projects helped its Q1 investment tally to US$1.1bn, a quarterly record; and Mexico, where continuing activity in both solar and wind pushed up its total by 3% year-on-year to US$1.3bn. The financial close on a 91 MW geothermal project in Indonesia helped that country’s total of US$757m in Q1 2018.

The global Q1 figures are the lowest for any quarter since Q3 2016 but, according to BNEF, it is too early to predict a fall in annual investment this year. For instance, BNEF expects to see the financing of a number of big-ticket offshore wind projects in UK, Belgian, Dutch and Danish waters during the months ahead.

Breaking investment down by type, Q1 saw a 16% fall in the asset finance of utility-scale renewable energy projects worldwide, to US$44.3bn, but there was a 16% rise to US$14.3bn in the funding of small solar systems of less than 1 MW.

Public markets investment in specialist clean energy companies plunged 75% to US$509m, the lowest in any quarter for two years. Venture capital and private equity investment was much more impressive, climbing 65% to US$2.4bn, its highest since Q3 2016.

VC/PE deals in the latest quarter were led by US$475m and US$348m Series B rounds for Chinese electric car companies Beijing CHJ Information Technology and Guangzhou Xiaopeng Motors, and a US$224m private equity expansion capital round for Enerkem, the Canadian biofuel technology developer.

Instalación de procesamiento, almacenamiento de biomasa y planta de generación de energía eléctrica a partir de biomasa de 50 MW en Huelva (España). Foto cortesía de ENCE | Processing facilities, biomass storage and 50 MW biomass power plant in Huelva (Spain). Photo courtesy of ENCE

According to a new report from ecoprog, in early 2017, there were 3,510 operational biomass power plants worldwide, generating electricity and heat from solid biomass and with a total installed capacity of 52.8 GW. By the end of 2017, ecoprog estimates that there will be around 3,700 active power plants, with a capacity of some 56.2 GW. In just one year, 200 biomass power plants with a capacity of almost 3 GW were commissioned. While Europe showed a slight decrease in newly commissioned biomass power plants over the past year, Asia’s commissioning rate remains at a high level. In North America, low electricity prices have resulted in commissioning insecurities, with the commissioning rate slowing in 2016/2017. The attractive incentive scheme in Japan resulted in a growing commissioning rate in the Australia and Pacific region. At the same time, consolidation and globalisation continued among the technology providers in 2017.

The market for biomass power plants, the number of plants and their respective capacities, is a result of the subsidisation schemes and the availability of positive economic conditions at favourable locations, e.g. in the sugar or the paper industry. Regions with high political subsidies in the form of feed-in tariffs have comparatively young plant assets that are characterised by small-scale plants. This is the case in most European countries. Today, many systems primarily subsidise small-scale plants due to ecological sustainability. Europe’s plants are therefore on average smaller than in other regions such as North America. By contrast, fuel availability is the determining factor in North and South America as well as in many Asian markets, as subsidisation levels are often lower than in Europe.

North America and Europe mainly use wood to generate energy, while South American countries primarily incinerate bagasse, a waste product of the sugarcane industry. Agricultural residues such as straw, rice husks and empty fruit bunches from the palm oil industry represent the main fuels in Asia. Read more…

Article published in: FuturENERGY March 2018

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Fluctuations in the prices of fossil fuels, the need to address climate change and the growing energy demand, present the current energy model with major challenges. To address them at the same time as achieving high levels of efficiency, new hybrid energy models based on renewable energy are emerging that aim to make a better use of resources and facilitate an energy supply over a longer period. This is the case of CSP-biomass plants designed to produce power using ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) technology. Innergy is active throughout the entire value chain of an energy project with biomass, providing services that range from the development, production and sale of heat and automation generation equipment to O&M. The company enjoys extensive experience in all types of biomass, industrial biomass boilers and both ORC and steam technology, qualifying it to support biomass for this type of energy solutions.

This type of hybrid energy solution is so interesting because CSP plants need sunlight to shine directly onto their mirrors in order to produce electricity. On cloudy days these plants remain stopped, not generating power and requiring energy from other sources. On the other hand, there is energy generation equipment that uses biomass, a sustainable fuel source that is not subject to weather phenomena, but which, despite existing in large quantities, must be used in a controlled and sustainable manner.

By combining both types, solar power is used on clear days, with the cloudy days covered by energy originating from biomass. This ensures that the plant can operate 365 days a year as it is energy independent from monopolies and large corporations, as well achieving price stability. Read more…

Article published in: FuturENERGY March 2018

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Worldwide, there are over 3,500 operational biomass power plants. They generate electricity and heat from solid biomass, reaching an installed capacity of 52.8 GWel. Within a year, 200 biomass power plants with a capacity of almost 3 GWel were commissioned. Significant growth rates in Asia are compensating the less dynamic development in the European key markets. At the same time, consolidation and globalisation continued among the technology providers in 2017. These are two of the results of a current ecoprog market report, called Biomass to Power.

The market for biomass power plants is mainly stimulated by renewable energy subsidies, especially in Europe, where first support schemes for electricity generation from solid biomass were introduced in the 1990s already.

By contrast, fuel availability is the determining factor in North and South American as well as many Asian markets, as subsidisation levels are oftentimes lower than in Europe. North America and Europe mainly use wood to generate energy, while South American countries primarily incinerate bagasse, a residue of the sugarcane industry. Agricultural residues such as straw, rice husks and empty fruit bunches from the palm oil industry are the main fuels in Asia.

What all the plants have in common is their intense waste heat utilisation (combined heat and power, CHP). About 60% of the biomass power plants are located at industrial sites. Many of them are fuelled with local production residues (palm oil fruit bunches, bagasse, wood-processing residues) and in turn deliver heat to the production process. Around 30% of all facilities are connected to district heating grids; most of those are located in colder regions such as Central Europe and Scandinavia. About 10% of the biomass power plants generate power only and do not use their waste heat at all. Many of them are located in China, where waste heat utilisation is not a requirement for obtaining subsidies.

The market development depends on how profitable RE subsidies are, especially in Europe. Many markets are saturated after many years of subsidisation, which would make the construction of new capacities only worthwhile with granting further generous subsidies. Additionally, Europe has fewer agricultural residues that can be used for thermal recovery than other regions.

As the already existing plants run at high operating costs, many European countries are lowering RE subsidies. For instance, the UK decided to no longer organise allocation rounds for renewable energies after 2019. In September 2017, Poland postponed its much-anticipated biomass auction indefinitely. This auction was initially planned for October 2017. Romania does also not seem to consider reintroducing RE subsidies.

Other European countries, however, are strengthening RE support. The Netherlands decided an 8 billion EUR support scheme for 2018, which is as much as in 2017. Finland is to establish a new auctioning system in 2018/2019, which will also include biomass power plants.

Globally, subsidisation systems did not change significantly in the past year. Argentina has to be mentioned as a special case, however: In 2017, the country approved subsidies for 14 biomass power plants with a capacity of 117 MWel and also announced the next auction for 2018.

The worldwide market for BMPPs will continue to develop dynamically until 2026. Throughout the world, another 2,000 biomass power plants with an installed capacity of over 25 GWel will be constructed. About 50% of this increase will happen in Asia and especially in the Chinese and Indian key markets. North and South America are to remain attractive markets for solid biomass electricity generation as well, mainly Brazil, Canada and the USA. The overall subsidisation level in Europe, however, will continue to decrease in the light of high costs and ecological aspects (sustainability). Europe will therefore become a less dynamic market.

As a result of the trends described above, consolidation and globalisation among the technology providers continued in 2017. For instance, UK-based Amec Foster Wheeler Group (today Wood Group) sold its fluidised bed combustion business to Japanese technology provider Sumitomo. Danish technology provider Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor, part of Japanese Mitsui Group, took over financially troubled plant manufacturer Burmeister & Wain Energy. Danish technology provider Babcock & Wilcox Vølund was imposed a cost-cutting programme by US parent company Babcock & Wilcox, including the dismissal of 30% of staff.

Source: ecoprog

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