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FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

E-mobility has been emerging into our lives for years and although it has always seemed that its arrival would take place at some indeterminate time in the near future, the electric vehicle has recently rocked the entire industrial sector as well as public opinion. The waiting is over. The electric vehicle is a reality, with new models arriving every few months, offering attractive designs, new battery capacities, greater ranges and prices, which although still higher than their thermal counterparts, are relatively contained and justifiable given the performance and the total cost of ownership or the cost throughout the total life of the vehicle…By David Iriarte, Key Account Manager EM, Ingeteam.

Flexible energy options, such as energy storage, smart-charging electric vehicles, demand response and interconnectors, are needed to ensure that the energy transition proceeds on an optimal path. Our expensive power system would otherwise be reliant on fossil-fueled backup and installing excess wind and solar capacity.

The four types of flexibility mentioned above can accelerate the transition to a cleaner power system and ultimately enable the efficient integration of 80% or more renewable energy by 2040, according to two reports published today by BloombergNEF (BNEF) in partnership with Eaton and Statkraft.

The Flexibility Solutions for High-Renewable Energy Systems reports model a number of alternative scenarios for future power systems in the UK and Germany, respectively, depending on how each flexibility technology might develop in the coming years.

Energy storage and smart electric vehicle charging provide flexibility by moving large volumes of renewable energy to periods of high demand, or moving demand to periods of high renewable generation. Dispatchable demand response reduces the need for fossil-fired backup plants in the power system, reducing emissions. Interconnecting to Nordic hydro can address periods of both excess supply and excess demand, providing different benefits over the decades as the needs of the system evolve.

The two studies – focused on the UK and Germany – highlight that policies and regulation accelerating the adoption of these technologies are key to make a cleaner, cheaper, and more efficient power system possible.

Specific findings for the UK include:

•None of the scenarios halt the transition to a low-carbon power system. In all scenarios, the renewable share of generation exceeds 70% by 2030 as wind and solar become dominant, thanks to their dramatic and ongoing cost improvements. However, without new sources of clean flexibility, the system will be oversized and wasteful, making it 13% more expensive by 2040 and with 36% higher emissions.
•Greater electrification of transport yields major emissions savings with little risk to the power generation system. Avoided fuel emissions far outstrip added power sector emissions. The power generation system will comfortably integrate all these electric vehicles, and the system benefits are even greater if most EVs charge flexibly. However, local distribution networks are likely to face challenges.
•Accelerated energy storage development can hasten the transition to a renewable power system, with significant benefits by 2030 including a 13% emissions reduction and 12% less fossil backup capacity needed.

Specific findings for Germany include:

•In Germany, adding flexibility supports coal through 2030, even as renewables grow to dominate the market. This counterintuitive finding is not due to a problem with batteries, EVs, demand response or interconnectors – cheap coal is the culprit. Flexible technologies are important because they can integrate inflexible generation – and in Germany’s case, its inexpensive lignite plants also benefit. To decarbonize, Germany needs to address existing coal generation while investing in renewables, flexibility and interconnection.
•Still, by 2040, adding more batteries, flexible electric vehicles and interconnections with the Nordics all enable greater renewable penetration and emissions savings. More flexible demand, on the other hand, reduces the need for battery investment.
•Even with coal-heavy power, adding EVs reduces transport emissions.

Groupe Renault, Morbihan Energie, Les Cars Bleus and Enedis have joined forces to create FlexMob’île, an innovative programme aimed at accompanying the energy transition on the French island of Belle-Île-en-Mer. This smart electric ecosystem is founded on three core activities, namely the sharing of electric vehicles, the stationary storage of solar energy and smart charging. FlexMob’île sees Groupe Renault continue to develop the principle of smart islands, the first of which was Portugal’s Porto Santo, which has been operational since last February.

For the next 24 months, Groupe Renault and its public and private partners will be developing a smart electric ecosystem that has been conceived to reduce the island’s carbon footprint and increase its energy independence.

From 2019, Belle-Île-en-Mer residents and visitors to the island will have access to a fleet of electric cars by means of a self-service hire programme featuring Renault ZOE and Kangoo Z.E. These vehicles will be powered thanks to a network of charging stations located close to the island’s main attractions.

This new carsharing service will take advantage of surplus energy produced by solar panels installed on the roofs of the island’s main public buildings. For instance, solar panels on the school’s rooftop provide heat and lighting for classrooms during the week, while the energy produced at weekends or during school holidays will be used to charge the cars.

By promoting the use of locally-produced renewable energy, FlexMob’île will offer the island’s economic stakeholders enhanced flexibility while at the same time promising substantial savings.

For example, Groupe Renault plans to provide second-life electric car batteries for the island’s largest holiday residences facility. These batteries will be used to store energy produced during the day by solar panels for use in the evening, chiefly to heat the bungalows. This should allow the centre to extend its season which until now has been restricted by central heating costs.

Source: Groupe Renault

The number of electric vehicles (EVs) worldwide is growing rapidly and BP is working across the supply chain to support the development of the technologies and infrastructure required to support that growth. BP believes that ultra-fast charging will be key in accelerating the adoption of EVs worldwide.

Ultra-fast charging is at the heart of BP’s electrification strategy. StoreDot’s technology shows real potential for car batteries that can charge in the same time it takes to fill a gas tank.

StoreDot has developed a lithium ion-based battery technology which enables ultra-fast charging for the mobile and industrial markets. Using this technology, StoreDot is also developing a new type of electric car battery that will aim to achieve a charging experience that is comparable to the time spent to refuel a traditional car. StoreDot currently expects first sales of its flash batteries for mobile devices as early as 2019.

BP is committed to a lower carbon future, aiming to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in its operations, improve its products and services to help customers lower their emissions, and create new low carbon businesses. BP’s work on advanced mobility and developing fast and convenient EV charging networks, including venturing investments in both StoreDot and Freewire Technologies, supports customers who aim to reduce their emissions through EVs.

Source: BP

A report recently published by the European Environment Agency (EEA) shows that there is still serious underinvestment in electric vehicle recharging infrastructure across Europe, with only one in three EU member states providing incentives.

According to the EEA report, specific incentives for electric vehicle charging points were found in only 10 out of the EU28. The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) cautions that investments need to be stepped up, as future reductions of CO2 emissions from cars and vans are strongly dependent on increased sales of electric and other alternatively-powered vehicles.

This will only happen with an EU-wide roll-out of a charging and refuelling infrastructure. As the EEA points out in its report: a sufficient charging infrastructure is required to give people the confidence that fully electric vehicles will reliably meet their travel needs and help reduce anxiety linked with possible limitations in range. In this respect, the Directive on Alternative Fuel Infrastructure (DAFI) set clear objectives for the 28 member states as far back as 2014. To date, however, the implementation of the DAFI by national governments has been poor.

Although electric vehicle sales have increased in line with global car sale growth in recent years, their overall market share remains low (1.4% of total EU car sales), growing by just 0.8% between 2014 and 2017.

Even though all manufacturers are expanding their portfolios of electric cars, we unfortunately see that market penetration of these vehicles is quite weak and patchy across the EU,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. “Consumers looking for an alternative to diesel often opt for petrol or hybrid vehicles, but the large-scale switch to the EV is not yet taking place. This new EEA report confirms that a dense EU-wide charging infrastructure network is an absolute must if we want consumers throughout the EU to really embrace electric vehicles.”

Although the European Commission has acknowledged that the market uptake of alternatively-powered vehicles and infrastructure roll-out are intrinsically connected, its recent proposal on post-2021 CO2 targets for passenger cars and vans does not link the availability of charging infrastructure to the proposed CO2 objectives.

In order to reflect the reality of the market, ACEA believes that Europe’s long-term climate goals should be linked to future infrastructure availability and consumer acceptance.

Groupe Renault and EEM Empresa de Electricidade da Madeira, SA, which produces, transports and distributes and sells electricity on the two inhabited Portuguese islands of Madeira archipelago (Madeira and Porto Santo), has announced the launch of a smart electric ecosystem on the island of Porto Santo. This world-first smart island uses electric vehicles, second-life batteries, smart charging and V2G to boost the island’s energy independence and stimulate the production of renewable energy. Groupe Renault, EEM and their partners have been working since the beginning of the year on this project, which is expected to last 18 months.

The government of the Autonomous Region of Madeira will roll out an innovative programme in Porto Santo, known as Sustainable Porto Santo – Smart Fossil Free Island, to facilitate the energy transition. EEM, which is in charge of the programme’s energy and electric mobility, has chosen Groupe Renault as its partner for electric mobility solutions.

The project comprises three complementary phases. First, 20 volunteer users in Porto Santo will drive 14 ZOEs and 6 Kangoo Z.E.s for their everyday use. These vehicles will be able to benefit from smart charging thanks to the 40 public and private charging points set up by EEM and Renault on the island.

Second, by the end of 2018, the vehicles will step up their interaction with the grid by providing it with electricity during peak hours. In addition to being smart charged, the electric vehicles will therefore also serve as temporary energy storage units.

Third, second-life batteries from Renault electric vehicles will be used to store the fluctuating supply of energy produced by Porto Santo’s solar and wind farms. Stored as soon as it is produced, this energy is recovered by the grid as and when needed to meet local demand. Some of these batteries come from Madeira Island. For the first time, Groupe Renault demonstrates real life re-employing of second-life batteries in a local ecosystem.

About the smart electric ecosystem

Smart charging adjusts battery charging rates as a function of users’ needs and the availability of electricity via the grid. Batteries are charged when supply exceeds demand, notably during renewable energy production peaks. Charging ceases when demand for electricity outstrips supply by the grid, thereby optimising the supply of local renewable energy.

In the case of V2G charging, electric vehicles provide electricity to the grid during peak hours. In this way, not only do they benefit from the advantages of smart charging, but they will also serve as a means to store energy temporarily.

Once life as a power source for electric vehicles is over, EV batteries continue to be capable of storing a significant amount of energy. Renault is able to harness this energy in less demanding environments, notably for the purposes of stationary energy storage. By giving batteries a second lease of life, Renault is today able to cover the full spectrum of energy storage needs, from individual homes to office buildings, factories, schools and apartment blocks, and even the charging of electric vehicles.

Source: Groupe Renault

Groupe Renault has partnered with southern Europe’s first high power charging network, E-VIA FLEX-E. The aim of the network is to reduce charging times and promote long-distance travel across Europe in new-generation electric cars.

The project will kick off at the end of 2018 with the inauguration of 14 High Power charging stations in Italy, France and Spain, including eight in Italy, four in Spain and two in France. The extra-urban network will comprise High Power Charging (HPC) stations with a capacity of between 150 kW and 350 kW located along motorways and expressways.

Renault’s partners in the E-VIA FLEX-E project include ENEL, Nissan, EDF, Enedis, Verbund and IBIL. The project is part of the European Commission’s Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) for Transport programme, which provides targeted investment in transport infrastructure to boost growth and competitiveness. CEF will fund half of the project’s total budget of €6.9 million.

Groupe Renault has supported the deployment of high power charging infrastructure for two years now in a bid to promote the use of electric cars. The Group has also partnered with the Ultra-E and High Speed Electric Mobility Across Europe networks in northern Europe, composed of 25 and 158 charging stations respectively.

Source: Groupe Renault

Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc. and Toyota Motor Corporation announce that the two companies have concluded a basic agreement with the aim of commencing a verification project that entails construction of a large-capacity storage battery system (Storage Battery System) that reuses electrified vehicle batteries (batteries), as well as examination of the recycling of used batteries.

Chubu Electric Power recognizes the importance of accurate management of fluctuations in its energy supply-demand balance caused by the recent large-scale introduction of renewable energy, and is promoting efforts toward further improving the operation of its electric power system.

Toyota is actively promoting the use of electrified vehicles, as per “Toyota’s Challenge to Promote Widespread Use of Electrified Vehicles” announced in December 2017, and is also pursuing the effective use of batteries and the development of social infrastructure that will support the widespread adoption of electrified vehicles.

  1. Reuse of Batteries

Pursuant to the basic agreement concluded today, the two companies aim to reuse batteries collected from electrified vehicles manufactured by Toyota as a storage battery system for utilization in meeting various challenges posed by the electric power system.

When combined in large numbers, used batteries, even with reduced performance levels, can be repurposed for energy supply-demand adjustments, frequency fluctuation management, and voltage fluctuation management in distribution systems, all factors that accompany the widespread introduction of renewable energy.

Not only can these efforts serve as a solution to address the challenges within the electric power system, Chubu Electric Power and Toyota expect these efforts to have positive effects in the operation of thermal power plants.

Examples of using the Storage Battery System to solve challenges in the electric power system (illustration)

  1. Utilization for energy supply-demand adjustment
Utilization for energy supply-demand adjustment
  1. Utilization to counter frequency fluctuations
Utilization to counter frequency fluctuations
  1. Utilization to counter voltage fluctuations in distribution systems
Utilization to counter voltage fluctuations in distribution systems

In FY 2018, Chubu Electric Power and Toyota will commence verification of the Storage Battery System. Based on the results of the verification test, the two companies aim to introduce power generation capacity of approximately 10,000 kW, equivalent to 10,000 batteries, in FY 2020.

The initial stage will involve nickel-metal hydride batteries, which are currently being used in large quantities, mainly in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV). By around 2030, the plan is to include lithium-ion batteries from electric vehicles (EV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV).

  1. Recycling of Batteries

The two companies will consider establishing a mechanism to recycle reused batteries by collecting materials such as rare-earth metals and re-utilizing them.

Flow of reusing/recycling (illustration)

Flow of reusing/recycling (illustration)

Both companies will continue to contribute to the further development of the region with an aim of achieving both a resource recycling society and a low-carbon society through initiatives such as the commercialization of battery reuse and recycling.

Offering an intelligent and cost-effective solution for charging larger fleets during the night and ensuring zero emission transportation during the day, ABB showcases its new HVC-Overnight Charging products and smart charging functionality.

From 20-25 October on stand 816, Hall 8 at Busworld 2017 in Kortrijk, Belgium ABB will showcase its latest solution for charging electric buses, incorporating smart charging features with a future proof and modular design, safe and reliable operation and remote service and data management as part of the ABB Ability™ portfolio of solutions.

After 12 years of research and development in EV charging solutions and experience from commercial products in the field since 2010, the HVC-Overnight Charger offers a compact, single power cabinet paired with up to three charge boxes. This means that after the first vehicle has finished charging, the next will start charging automatically, maximizing vehicle availability and reducing the initial investment and subsequent operational costs.

Frank Mühlon, Head of ABB’s Global Business for Electric Vehicle Charging explains: “Policy makers across the globe are focusing on developing sustainable public transit solutions to tackle emissions in and around the most densely populated cities.

“At ABB we have always been at the forefront of developing state-of-the-art and cost-efficient solutions that meet our customers’ needs and enable us all to look forward to a greener future. The launch of our HVC-Overnight Charging products enabling a smart sequential charging is another significant step towards making this a reality.”

Designed with scalability in mind, the power cabinets of ABB’s HVC-Overnight Charger can be upgraded from 50kW to 100kW or 150kW at any time.

The chargers also come with an extensive suite of connectivity features including remote monitoring, remote management, remote diagnostics, and remote software upgrades. These advanced services from ABB Ability™ provide customers with powerful insight into their charging operation, and enable high uptime and fast response to problems.

Also being showcased by ABB at Busworld 2017 is the HVC-Opportunity Charging range, which offers high-power automated charging for both single and double deck electric buses from any manufacturer in as little as 3-6 minutes by using a pantograph coming down from the infrastructure.

In addition, visitors to the ABB stand will be able to find out about its innovative TOSA flash charging and on-board electric vehicle technology for e-buses. Electric bus lines can save thousands of tons of carbon dioxide per year when compared with diesel counterparts.

ABB has provided charging solutions as part of its drive to promote sustainable mobility since 2010 and has sold more than 6,000 cloud connected DC fast-chargers around the world for passenger cars and commercial vehicles.

First EV chargers, targeted for long range vehicles, capable to provide an output power of 350 kW and a high voltage of 1000 V are actually built and installed by Efacec.

Efacec is already working on several projects with this high power charging solutions, namely with world-renowned brands such as carmakers and charge point network operators for a total of 44 high power units of its HV range sold until December 2016. These are intended for projects for various locations in the world, and hopes that many more will come in Europe and USA. Installations have started and will go on through 2017 and will be announced in the near future.

 

This range is composed of several HV products with different powers available, such as 50, 160, 175 and 350 kW, covering different needs of the market.

At a time when the electric mobility in the world is exponentially growing and electric vehicles with batteries with increasing autonomy call for constant innovation and improvement of the EV charging options, Efacec Electric Mobility officially presented its range of high power chargers for electric vehicles last October in Munich at eCarTec 2016.

The HV175 is a high power charging solution, able to supply up to 920 V nominal and 1000 V maximum at a maximum current of 350 A by combining two HV175 units to an user interface unit with adequate cable and connector to form the HV350. Connecting more HV175 units to a mechanical connection allows higher currents as can be used by some heavy vehicles.

This HV range complements the range of EV chargers Efacec already presents, covering solutions for private, public, fast and wireless charging.

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