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clean energy

The year 2018 saw $2.8 billion spent on renewables projects in sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) – a regional record and some $600 million more than the previous year, according to a new report published by BloombergNEF (BNEF). More renewables investment flowing to sub-Saharan African countries than ever before is a testament to how cheaper technology, investor familiarity and subsidy schemes are helping clean energy spread across the continent.

As investors cast a wider net, projects are being built outside of mature markets such as South Africa. Many utility-scale solar projects are being developed in countries that have not built much renewables infrastructure to date. Some 1.2GW of PV are expected to come online in 2021 outside of South Africa – that is more than twice the amount commissioned in 2018.

Country-level targets and incentives are backed by assistance from multilaterals, which remain a key source of finance and have helped roll out renewable energy auction programs. The World Bank’s Scaling Solar program for instance awarded just under 400MW of PV capacity over 2015-18, equivalent to 39% of the total installed outside of South Africa over the same period. Such auctions have yielded some of the world’s lowest bid prices for solar power – several projects have won capacity at prices under $0.04/kWh.

But such auctions are double-edged. On the one hand, they prove that large-scale renewables can be procured throughout the region and help develop local familiarity with clean energy. Many are bundled with features designed to reduce project costs and risk, such as pre-secured sites. Yet, as BNEF analyst Antoine Vagneur-Jones points out, “that helps lower prices, but can also lead to government expecting to procure power at the same rates for projects that are not backed by such frameworks.”

Other hurdles remain to be overcome. Several sub-Saharan African countries sport an apparent surplus in installed power generation capacity. Taken at face value, this can weaken the case for adding renewables. But plant availability issues and transmission constraints mean that the gap between supply and demand is often less clear than it would seem.

Meanwhile, a prevalence of take-or-pay contracts means that producers are remunerated for power that is not consumed. Whether by attempting to terminate or renegotiate contracts, governments are striving to reduce their obligations in countries such as Ghana, Kenya and South Africa. Achieving clarity on how to balance future clean energy investments with procurement agreements will be vital if the clean energy is to grow at scale.

The development of regional power markets will allow countries to move beyond such bilateral agreements. Power has long been traded in southern Africa, and nascent power pools in eastern and western Africa will enable countries to exchange surplus electricity across their borders. But a lack of private investment in transmission infrastructure, concentrated power markets and small generation fleets will hinder their growth.

Developers having access to guarantees and hard currency lowers barriers to investment, but risk perceptions are such that access to local financing for large-scale renewables remains a distant prospect. Yet recurrent shortages of hydropower and a shift away from financing coal by such backers as the African Development Bank are increasing the attractiveness of clean energy.

Source: BloombergNEF (BNEF)

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Figura 1. Volumen global de PPAs corporativos. Fuente: BloombergNEF. Nota: Los datos son hasta 2019, informados en MW MW de capacidad. Los PPA in situ no están incluidos. Los sleeved PPA de Australia no están incluidos. El número APAC es un estimado. No se incluyen los PPA de México previos a la reforma. Estas cifras están sujetas a cambios y pueden actualizarse a medida que haya más información disponible. / Figure 1. Global corporate PPA volumes. Source: BloombergNEF. Note: Data are through 2019, reported in MW DC capacity. Onsite PPAs are not included. Australia sleeved PPAs are not included. APAC number is an estimate. Pre-market reform Mexico PPAs are not included. These figures are subject to change and may be updated as more information is made available.

Corporations bought a record amount of clean energy through power purchase agreements, or PPAs, in 2019, up more than 40% from the previous year’s record. The majority of this purchasing occurred in the United States, but also underpinning the strong uptrend is a surge in corporate sustainability commitments around the world. BloombergNEF (BNEF) finds in its 1H 2020 Corporate Energy Market Outlook, that some 19.5 GW of clean energy contracts were signed by more than 100 corporations in 23 different countries in 2019. This was up from 13.6 GW in 2018, and more than triple the activity seen in 2017.

Put in context, the 2019 total was equivalent to more than 10% of all the renewable energy capacity added globally last year – and the projects involved are likely to cost between $20 billion and $30 billion to develop and build. Corporations have purchased over 50 GW of clean energy since 2008. That is bigger than the power generation fleets of markets like Vietnam and Poland. These buyers are reshaping power markets and the business models of energy companies around the world.

Technology companies once again dominated clean energy procurement. Google signed contracts to purchase over 2.7 GW of clean energy globally in 2019, more than any other corporation. In September 2019, the tech giant announced contracts to purchase 1.9 GW of clean energy in six countries – the largest single announcement ever by a corporation. The company used a unique reverse auction process to sign these contracts, with developers taking part in a live, public bidding process. Facebook (1.1 GW), Amazon (0.9 GW) and Microsoft (0.8 GW) were the next largest buyers globally in 2019.

Though not as active as the technology sector, a growing number of oil and gas companies are signing clean energy deals. Occidental Petroleum, Chevron and Energy Transfer Partners all signed solar contracts in 2019, following in the steps of ExxonMobil, who kicked off the trend by signing two PPAs totalling 575 MW at the end of 2018.

Figure 1 shows that PPAs in the Americas region totalled an unprecedented 15.7 GW last year. The U.S. made up the bulk of this, at 13.6 GW – more than all of global activity in 2018. More than 80% of these contracts signed in the U.S. in 2019, or 11.2 GW, were under the virtual PPA model – synthetic contracts that can only be signed in deregulated markets. The remaining 2.4 GW of clean energy purchased by corporations in the U.S. in 2019 was transacted under green tariffs, which are offered by utilities in regulated markets.

It was also a record year for corporate PPAs in the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) and Latin America, where companies purchased 2.6 GW and 2 GW of clean energy, respectively. Notable in EMEA was the pivot to new European markets outside of the Nordics. Though nearly half of the activity still came from Sweden, Norway, Finland and Denmark, companies are now beginning also to sign long-term clean energy contracts in markets like Spain, Poland, France and Italy for the first time. Corporations signed two offshore wind contracts in Germany, indicative of future trends from buyers in the region. Those who cannot sign PPAs can turn to the region’s extensive certificates market.

In Latin America, which saw threefold growth in its corporate PPA market, Brazil and Chile have emerged as top markets. Brazilian customers with annual demand over 3 MW, known as wholesale consumers, have negotiated contracts directly with clean energy developers. In Chile, large mining companies like BHP Group and Antofagasta, facing similar investor pressure to oil and gas companies, are negotiating special clean energy supply agreements with retailers. Colombia is the next Latin American market to watch, following the successful roll-out of its first clean energy auctions.

While 2019 was a down year for corporate PPA activity in Asia Pacific (APAC), there is still plenty of buzz in the region. In Australia, onsite solar projects delivering power to corporations nearly doubled to 1 GW, and a growing number of retailers offer sleeved programs to deliver clean energy reliably to corporate buyers, similar to green tariffs in the U.S. China’s renewable portfolio standards (RPS) are officially in force, mandating that large power consumers meet a certain amount of their demand with clean energy. Japan’s non-fossil certificate auctions grew 11-fold, boosted by the country’s high level of participation in sustainability initiatives – unrivalled among Asian markets.

Corporate sustainability commitments also skyrocketed in 2019, and were a driving force behind the record-breaking year for PPAs in 2019. Nearly 400 companies around the world committed to setting a science-based target in 2019, more than doubling the total number of firms with these goals. These firms have pledged to reduce their emissions in line with the Paris Agreement, and clean energy will be an essential part of this strategy. Additionally, 63 companies set an ‘RE100’ target, pledging to offset 100% of their electricity demand with clean energy. The RE100 totalled 221 members through 2019, collectively consuming 233TWh of electricity in 2018, based on their latest filings – slightly less than South Africa’s entire power generation fleet.

BNEF estimates these 221 RE100 companies will need to purchase an additional 210TWh of clean electricity in 2030 to meet their targets. Should this shortfall be met with offsite PPAs, it would catalyze an estimated 105 GW of new solar and wind build globally. Funding these new additions would be expected to require an additional $98 billion of investment (including allowance for capital cost reductions during the 2020s).

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Climatescope 2019 profiles 104 emerging markets worldwide and evaluates their ability to attract capital for low-carbon energy sources while building a greener economy. For the first time since BloombergNEF began the Climatescope survey, India tops the rankings. The Asian nation is followed in the top five by Chile, Brazil, China and Kenya.

Below is described what, according to BloombergNEF, drove each of the top five markets to the top of the ranking.

1. India

India’s ambitious policy framework and copious capacity expansions pushed the country to 1st position in 2019, from 2nd in 2018. The Indian government has set one of the world’s most ambitious renewable energy targets by aiming for 175 GW by 2022, with 100 GW to come from solar, 60 GW from wind, and 15 GW from other sources.

India has also held the most competitive and largest auctions for clean energy power-delivery contracts. These resulted in the procurement of the equivalent of 19 GW in 2018 alone. Together, these developments pushed the country to the top of the table on its Fundamentals score and 3rd on Opportunities in the Climatescope ranking.

Renewables, excluding large hydro, account for 81GW of India’s 356GW capacity. Since 2017, capacity additions from renewables have exceeded those of coal. While wind capacity additions of 2.3 GW in 2018 were 44% below 2017 levels, solar saw its best year to date with 9 GW installed. This included utility-scale, rooftop and off-grid capacity. Wind’s 2018 decline was partly due to a switch in the market from a reliance on feed-in tariffs to reverse auctions.

2. Chile

Chile’s exceptional natural resources, along with (until very recently) a stable government and healthy economy have made it attractive to clean energy investors. The government has set ambitious long-term clean energy goals and begun implementing policies which make renewables more price competitive. Targets include a clean energy mandate of 20% of generation for utilities by 2025 and 60% of generation by 2035. By 2050, the country aims to have 70% renewables generation. This led to Chile finishing 2nd in the Fundamentals section of the Climatescope ranking. (It should be noted, however, that recent events have certainly called into question the stability of the Chile market and Climatescope scores are based on a country’s status as of the prior year-end.)
At the end of 2018, Chile had 2.3 GW of solar and 1.5 GW of wind online. This represented 16% of total installed capacity and renewables (excluding large hydro) accounted for 15% of all power generated. Wind generation in Chile surged from 1.4 TWh in 2014 to 3.6 TWh in 2018, while solar output spiked from 0.5T Wh to 5.1 TWh. Together, wind and solar represented 11% of total 2018 power generation, up from virtually nothing five years ago.

3. Brazil

Brazil continues to be one of the main emerging markets for renewable energy deployment and the largest power market in Latin America, with a total installed capacity of 162 GW in 2018. Its matrix remains highly reliant on hydropower, which accounted for roughly 65% of the country’s generation in 2018. However, penetration of non-hydro renewables generation has been growing year-on-year and reached a peak of 18% in 2018.

The country has a comprehensive and inviting clean energy policy framework and has pioneered competitive auctions to contract clean energy, which led to over 28 GW of renewable energy contracted 2009-2018.

With the worst of its economic crisis now behind it and plans to hold two auctions per year 2019-21, clean energy appears poised for renewed growth. Brazil attracted almost $56 billion in new asset finance for clean energy plants 2009-18, by far the largest amount in Latin America over the period.

4. China

A decade of nearly uninterrupted growth in clean energy in China came to an abrupt end in 2018. Changes to critical policies resulted in new investment sinking to $86 billion in 2018 from $122 billion the year prior, and new-build for clean energy dropping to 71 GW from 76 GW. Generous feed-in tariffs that were the norm for much of the past decade are coming to an end. Despite this, China still represents a land of enormous potential for renewables, scoring highest among all Climatescope countries for Opportunities.

Although coal still dominates China’s power system, accounting for 54% of capacity and 65% of generation in 2018, both figues are down nearly 10 percentage points from 2012, demonstrating the speed of change. Wind and solar together now account for 20% of capacity and almost 8% of generation in China, up from just 3% and 13%, respectively, in 2014.

5. Kenya

A boom in clean energy investment in 2018 along with Kenya’s extensive renewable energy value chain pushed the country to 5th position in the survey. Kenya is gradually boosting the contribution non-large hydro renewables make to its grid by adding more solar, wind and geothermal capacity. In 2018, non-hydro renewables accounted for 38% of the country’s capacity and 49% of generation. This is set to continue growing as clean energy investment reached a new record in 2018 with $1.4 billion attracted for geothermal, wind and solar plants.

The country is in the process of shifting from feed-in tariffs to reverse auctions as its primary means for spurring new-build. In August 2018, the parliament approved draft legislation to make this change but final action is still required. Under the last set of feed-in tariffs offered, the government received applications from over 4 GW of clean energy projects.

Source: BloombergNEF

Atos announces its participation in the European project RENAISSANCE, funded by the European Commission through the H2020 program. RENAISSANCE aims to promote clean production and shared distribution of energy in local communities through the development of new community-driven, scalable and replicable business models and technologies.

The project will focus on four local energy communities across Europe. The data collected in these pilot sites will enable dispersed assets to be connected – and thereby increase the use of renewable energy sources beyond 27%. This twofold approach, both business and technical, will provide innovation in the form of:

  • Identification of new business cases and scenarios to determine the optimal energy and organizational configuration needed in order to create decarbonized local energy systems.
  • Development of an information platform to enable integrated and coordinated management of the various sites. The potential for energy trading within and among communities will be analyzed natively as part of the platform, thereby increasing the amount of locally-produced energy and the share of renewable energy.

Atos, through its Research and Innovation department, will build the architecture of the RENAISSANCE Information Platform and manage its deployment in pilots. Atos will also design and coordinate the implementation of the platform as a central information warehouse – and its deployment and operability for advanced energy services in various environments: a hospital (Belgium), an university (Greece), a ski resort (Spain) and a city (the Netherlands).

RENAISSANCE activities and innovation are expected to contribute to and impact on the current hot topic of energy transition/digitalization and the European Commission’s new regulatory framework which positions Local Energy Communities as the new energy actors. In addition to the impact through the 4 pilot sites, the RENAISSANCE approach will also be simulated under market conditions connecting 10 sites across the globe, to demonstrate its scalability and replicability.

Source: Atos

New investment in wind, solar, and other clean energy projects in developing nations dropped sharply in 2018, largely due to a slowdown in China. While the number of new clean power-generating plants completed stayed flat year-to-year, the volume of power derived from coal surged to a new high, according to Climatescope, an annual survey of 104 emerging markets conducted by research firm BloombergNEF (BNEF).

The findings suggest that developing nations are moving toward cleaner power but not nearly fast enough to limit global CO2 emissions or the consequences of climate change. The majority of new power-generating capacity added in developing nations in 2018 came from wind and solar, for instance. But the majority of power to be produced from the overall fleet of power plants added in 2018 will come from fossil sources and emit CO2. This is due to wind and solar projects generating only when natural resources are available while oil, coal, and gas plants can potentially produce around the clock.

Meanwhile, the volume of actual coal-fired power generated and consumed in developing countries jumped to 6.9 thousand TWh in 2018, up from 6.4 thousand in 2017. The approximately 500 TWh in new coal consumption is roughly equivalent to all the power consumed in Texas in a normal year. Across the 104 emerging markets surveyed in Climatescope, coal accounted for 47% of all generation.

China, both the world’s largest CO2 emitter and largest market for clean energy production and consumption, played a crucial role in the story. Investment in new wind, solar, and other non-large hydro renewables projects in the country fell to $86 billion in 2018 from $122 billion in 2017. That net decline mirrored a $36 billion drop in emerging markets’ clean energy investment figures.

The decline was not confined to China, however. Inflows to clean energy projects in India and Brazil slipped $2.4 billion and $2.7 billion, respectively from the year prior. Across all emerging markets surveyed, 2018 investment fell to $133 billion, lower than not just the 2017 total but the 2015 figure as well. Overall, declining costs for solar and wind played a considerable factor in the fall in absolute dollar investment in emerging economies.

Excluding China, India and Brazil, clean energy investment jumped to $34 billion in 2018 from $30 billion in 2017. Most notably, Vietnam, South Africa, Mexico and Morocco led the rankings with a combined investment of $16 billion in 2018. Excluding China alone, new clean energy installations in emerging markets grew 21% to achieve a new record, with 36 GW commissioned in 2018, up from 30 GW in 2017. This is twice the clean energy capacity added in 2015 and three times the capacity installed in 2013.

Despite the spike in coal-fired generation, the pace of new coal capacity added to grids in developing nations is slowing, according to Climatescope. New construction of coal-fired power plants fell to the lowest level in a decade in 2018. After peaking at 84 GW of new capacity added in 2015, coal project completions plummeted to 39 GW in 2018. China accounted for approximately two thirds of this decline.

In addition to presenting macro trends on clean energy in developing countries, Climatescope scores and ranks individual markets on their overall potential for clean energy development. For the first time since the country was included in the survey in 2014, India was the highest-scoring nation, due to a variety of factors, including supportive policies. The rest of the top five included Chile, Brazil, China, and Kenya, in that order.

Source: BloombergNEF (BNEF)

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Europe has set a target that 32% of its energy should come from renewables by 2030, up from 17.5% today. Corporates are and can play an even bigger role in meeting this target. Thousands of key corporate buyers – including from the steel, aluminium, ICT, and chemicals industries – and clean energy suppliers, are meeting in Amsterdam at the RE-Source 2019 event – for a two-day conference to discuss how to accelerate efforts to source more renewable energy.

The last weeks have seen an abundance of significant solar and wind sourcing agreements from major corporates around the world. Google announced its largest corporate renewable purchase in history, including nearly 800 MW of new renewable energy in Europe. Amazon recently unveiled plans to reach 100% renewable energy by 2030.

The Airports Council International (ACI Europe) also announced at the event a new partnership with the RE-Source Platform to accelerate the clean energy transition of the airport industry and help it achieve its 2050 net zero commitment. In addition, the RE-Source Platform received a €500,000 grant from Google.org to fund further the development of new renewable energy purchasing models, provide training and resources for consumers, and enable more widespread access to clean power.

Corporate sourcing of renewables has risen rapidly in Europe, with 7.5 GW of Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) deals signed over the past five years, and 1.6 GW worth of deals in 2019 alone. More European countries are engaging in PPA deals: 13 countries have inked PPAs in 2019 so far. Commercial and industrial on-site corporate sourcing accounted for 3.4 GW in 2018 and is expected to grow considerably in the next decade.

Industrial and commercial consumers account for more than half of Europe’s energy consumption today. Powering these corporate consumers with renewable energy could deliver both significant reductions in CO2 emissions and make European industries more competitive due to the rapidly falling cost of renewables.

According to a recent study from the European Commission, if EU-based corporate buyers committed to sourcing renewable electricity to meet 30% of their total electricity demand by 2030, the EU renewable energy sector would generate more than €750bn in gross added value and over 220,000 new jobs.

Governments can play their part in facilitating more companies to source renewables, by removing administrative hurdles for corporate renewable PPAs, and on-site and direct investments in renewable energy generation that exist throughout Europe. Under the new Renewable Energy Directive, European governments now have the duty to remove these barriers. Currently, only two of the draft National Energy and Climate Plans for 2030 even mention PPAs and none comply with the agreed legislation.

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Fotowatio Renewable Ventures (FRV), part of Abdul Latif Jameel Energy and a leading global developer of renewable utility-scale projects, has announced the financial close for Potrero Solar (296 MW dc), the Company’s second solar farm in Mexico.

FRV reached financial close last March with the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and Banco Nacional de Comercio Exterior (Bancomext), and it is expected that the plant which began construction in late May, will be completed by mid- 2020.

Potrero Solar is FRV’s first project in Mexico to be financed before having any of its products (energy, CELs or capacity) committed in the tender schemes, and one of the largest merchant PV projects worldwide. It is also one of the world’s largest PV projects to use bifacial technology. Once operational, the plant will trade the electricity generated as well as the associated clean energy certificates at the country’s energy market.

With an approximate area of 700 ha, Potrero Solar will be located in Lagos de Moreno, in the state of Jalisco, and will use bifacial PV modules, a new technology that has the ability to capture both direct sunlight from both the front and reflected light from the rear side.

The solar power farm will generate around 700 GWh of clean energy each year, enough to supply around 350,000 average Mexican homes and reduce the emission of 345,000 T/year of CO2. In addition, Potrero, which will be built by a consortium formed by multinationals Power China and Prodiel under an EPC contract, will boost the economic development of the local community including the potential of around 1,500 jobs during its construction phase.

Fernando Salinas, Managing Director of FRV Mexico and Central America, highlights: “Mexico is a country that offers numerous opportunities for both FRV and international investors, due to its favorable market and weather conditions for renewable energy projects. Potrero’s financial close marks a milestone as the largest bifacial plant in the world and FRV’s first fully merchant project in Mexico. By carrying out this flagship project that will lead the way for other large-scale bifacial PV plants and that is also one of the largest PV merchant projects worldwide, FRV demonstrates its leadership once again and its ability to be a spearhead in the wider renewable energy industry.”

Bancomext assures that “Potrero Solar has all the features a financial institution looks for during a transaction: an experienced, highly professional sponsor, high-quality technology, an EPC provider with a well-proven track-record and a solid financial structure. With this project, Bancomext reaffirms its leading position in the Mexican market, supporting renewable energies under the ‘spot market price’ scheme and fostering job creation in the country during the construction and operation phases.”

Fady Jameel, Deputy President and Vice Chairman of Abdul Latif Jameel, said: “At Abdul Latif Jameel Energy, we are delighted to move forward to the next phase of the Potrero project. Potrero confirms FRV’s positioning as one of the leaders in the global renewable energy sector and further reinforces our long-term commitment to Mexico’s drive for clean energy. Mexico is a strong and promising market for FRV and Abdul Latif Jameel Energy, and we look forward to seeing Potrero spearhead the development of the sector in the country and further afield.”

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Offshore wind East Anglia One

Iberdrola has hooked up the East Anglia One offshore wind farm to the British electricity grid. It is building the facilities in the North Sea, around 50 km from the coast of the county of Suffolk, in the United Kingdom, and it is scheduled to go into operation next year.

The first of 102 wind turbines, the so-called WTG E19, has already supplied clean power to the land substation in Burstall. Its subsidiary, ScottishPower Renewables, which installed 25 turbines on the site this summer, will gradually connect them to the grid.

With an investment of approximately 2.5 MM£ and covering an area of 300 km2, East Anglia One is one of the largest scale projects being developed by Iberdrola and the biggest renewable initiative ever developed by a Spanish company.

Once commissioned in 2020, it will be the world’s biggest wind farm, with an installed capacity of 714 MW that will supply 630,000 British homes with clean energy.

The construction of East Anglia One is driving the offshore power industry in Europe, providing jobs for more than 1,300 people in several countries – Spain, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the United Arab Emirates – and is crucial to several sectors, such as the naval industry. The project has been a great driving force in Spain, since Iberdrola has used local companies like Navantia, Windar and Siemens-Gamesa for the development of many of the essential components of the wind farm.

Technical specifications ofeast anglia one

  • 102 Siemens Gamesa wind turbines make up the wind farm, each with a capacity of 7 MW. Once installed, they will have a total height of 167 m.
  • A marine substation (Andalusia II), manufactured by Navantia in Puerto Real (Cádiz), will be responsible for receiving the electricity produced by the wind turbines and transforming the voltage so it can be sent to the coast through two undersea cables, each around 85 km long.
  • These cables are joined to a further six underground cables measuring around 37 km and running from Bawdsey to the new land-based transformer in Burstall, which connects the offshore wind farm to the national grid.
  • Of the 102 jacket-type foundations, Navantia has manufactured 42 in Fene (Spain) and Windar has built the pilot cables in Avilés (Asturias). The other 60 foundations were manufactured by Lamprell in the United Arab Emirates and by Harland & Wolff in Belfast.

 

Iberdrola, steadfast commitment to offshore wind power

Over the next few years, Iberdrola will redouble its investment in offshore wind production, developing a project portfolio with over 10,000 MW. This growth focuses on three main areas: the North Sea, the Baltic Sea and the United States.

Clean power generated by offshore wind farms are the cornerstone of the company’s strategy, which expects to allocate 39% of the 34 MM€ earmarked for the 2018-2022 period to this type of generation: 13.26 MM€.

The group is currently operating two offshore wind farms: West of Duddon Sands, which went into service in the North Sea in 2014, and Wikinger, in the German waters of the Baltic Sea, which has been operational since December 2017.

In the United States, Iberdrola is in the process of building the biggest offshore wind farm in that country: Vineyard Wind. Just off the coast of Massachusetts, it will produce 800 MW of power to cover the energy needs of a million homes.

In Germany, in April 2018, the company was awarded contracts to build two new plants in the Baltic Sea, with a total of 486 MW of power: Baltic Eagle and Wikinger South.

In addition to these new plants, the Sant Brieuc Wind Farm, which is located in French waters, is scheduled to be commissioned in 2022. It will have 496 MW of installed power and will be located just off the coast of French Brittany, 20 km offshore.

Once these projects are operating in late 2022, the company will have installed 2,000 MW of offshore wind power, after which it will add a further 1,000.

Iberdrola is seizing this excellent opportunity for growth, with ambitious objectives for new wind generation facilities in the United Kingdom and the United States for the next few years: 30,000 MW for 2030 in the former and 25,000 MW in the latter, each with different timelines.

Installed capacity of renewable power in Colombia is expected to rise from 2% in 2018 to 14% in 2025, with a further rise to 21% by 2030. Renewable capacity in the country is slated to increase fivefold to reach 5.9 GW at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24.4%. This growth can be attributed to new government policies facilitating funds for renewable energy projects, energy efficiency measures and announcement of renewable energy auctions in 2018, says GlobalData.

However, GlobalData’s latest report, “Colombia Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2019 – Market Trends, Regulations and Competitive Landscape, also reveals that the country’s coal-based capacity will increase by 43% between 2018 and 2030 to reach 2.4GW while gas-based power will contribute 14% of total capacity.

Renewable energy and energy efficiency projects will handle the demand side management in the near future. The country’s onshore wind capacity is expected to increase from 19.5 MW in 2018 to 3.4 GW in 2030, representing the country’s largest growth among its renewable sources. PV capacity is expected to reach 1.7 GW in 2030 from 172.6 MW in 2019 at 23% CAGR, while the biopower segment will see growth of 7% CAGR to reach 719 MW. To date, Colombia does not have any installed geothermal capacity but it is expected to have 50 MW installed by 2024, leading to 115 MW capacity in 2030 growing at 15% CAGR.”

Colombia’s Generation and Transmission Expansion Plan 2015-2029 is expected to accommodate high volumes of renewable energy in the near future. The anticipated grid expansion and modernization of 4.2GW to 6.7GW, which is aimed to support 1GW coal and 1.5 GW hydro, will involve huge investment in grid infrastructure industry. This, in turn, is likely to open up new markets for energy storage and energy efficiency systems to enable steady supply of power when adequate renewable energy is unavailable.

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Iberdrola continues to move forward with its renewables strategy in Spain with four new photovoltaic projects, with an installed capacity of 250 megawatts (MW), already submitted for official approval in Castilla-La Mancha, as stated in the Official State Gazette (BOE) and the Official Journals of the Castilla-La Mancha regional government.

Two of the projects, Romeral and Olmedilla, each with a capacity of 50 MW, are located in Cuenca province, in the towns of Uclés and Valverdejo, respectively. In Toledo province, Iberdrola is planning the Barcience photovoltaic plant (50 MW) in Bargas; and in Ciudad Real province, it will develop a unique project in the municipality of Puertollano, with a capacity of 100 MW.

Puertollano II combines several innovative elements, both in the technology used and the storage capacity of this renewable project:

  • The installation will have bifacial panels, which will allow for greater production, as they have two light-sensitive surfaces, providing a longer service life;
  • The plant has been designed with daisy-chained inverters to improve performance and permit greater use of the surface area;
  • The project will have a storage system that will make the plant more manageable and optimise the control strategies. The battery system (with a power of 5 MW) will have a storage capacity of 20 MWh.
  • The start of the development of these projects increases the MW that Iberdrola has under construction and awaiting approval in Spain to more than 2,200: 75% of the capacity the company plans to install by 2022.

Plan to relaunch clean energy in Spain

These actions are part of the company’s commitment to strengthening its investment in clean energy generation in Spain, with the installation of 3,000 new MW up to 2022, 52% more than its current wind and solar capacity. Up to 2030, the forecasts point to the installation of 10,000 new MW. The plan will create jobs for 20,000 people.

Iberdrola is committed to leading the transition towards a completely carbon-free economy by promoting renewable energies and speeding up its investment in Spain, where it intends to spend 8.000 M€ between 2018 and 2022.

Iberdrola is the most prolific producer of wind power in Spain, with an installed capacity of 5,770 MW, while its total installed renewable capacity, including both wind and hydroelectric power, is 15,828 MW. The company operates renewables with a capacity of 2,229 MW in Castilla-La Mancha, mainly wind power, making it the autonomous region with the second highest total of ‘green’ MW installed by Iberdrola.

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