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climate change

FuturENERGY Dec. 19 - Jan. 2020

The mobility and transport sector represents one of main focal points of CO2 emissions and other greenhouse gases (GHG) at global level, turning it into a field of priority activity in the fight against climate change. Its future is to achieve a more sustainable and low emissions mobility model. Energy infrastructures company, Redexis, is aware that its key role and commitment to new mobility models help solve the problem of climate and air quality in cities. As a result the company is driving the mobility transformation through its support for vehicular natural gas (VNG), and aims to create the largest network of gas stations in Spain, by announcing the construction of over 100 natural gas fuelling facilities in the next two years…

 

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FuturENERGY Dec.19 - Jan. 2020

Our vision is clear: 2020 must be the year of commitment to the energy transition and the fight against climate change, a key year in which to progress towards a zero-emissions energy model. For this we have to advance the decarbonisation of the energy mix while guaranteeing the safety and quality of the supply, for which energy storage systems will be key players… By Agustí Robirosa. Cluster Manager at AEPIBAL, the Spanish Batteries and Energy Storage Business Association.

 

The European Commission has presented The European Green Deal – a roadmap for making the EU’s economy sustainable by turning climate and environmental challenges into opportunities across all policy areas and making the transition just and inclusive for all.

President Ursula von der Leyen said: ‘The European Green Deal is our new growth strategy – for a growth that gives back more than it takes away. It shows how to transform our way of living and working, of producing and consuming so that we live healthier and make our businesses innovative. We can all be involved in the transition and we can all benefit from the opportunities. We will help our economy to be a global leader by moving first and moving fast. We are determined to succeed for the sake of this planet and life on it – for Europe’s natural heritage, for biodiversity, for our forests and our seas. By showing the rest of the world how to be sustainable and competitive, we can convince other countries to move with us.

Executive Vice-President Frans Timmermans added ‘We are in a climate and environmental emergency. The European Green Deal is an opportunity to improve the health and well-being of our people by transforming our economic model. Our plan sets out how to cut emissions, restore the health of our natural environment, protect our wildlife, create new economic opportunities, and improve the quality of life of our citizens. We all have an important part to play and every industry and country will be part of this transformation. Moreover, our responsibility is to make sure that this transition is a just transition, and that nobody is left behind as we deliver the European Green Deal.

The European Green Deal provides a roadmap with actions to boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy and stop climate change, revert biodiversity loss and cut pollution. It outlines investments needed and financing tools available, and explains how to ensure a just and inclusive transition.

The European Green Deal covers all sectors of the economy, notably transport, energy, agriculture, buildings, and industries such as steel, cement, ICT, textiles and chemicals.

To set into legislation the political ambition of being the world’s first climate neutral continent by 2050, the Commission will present within 100 days the first ‘European Climate Law’. To reach our climate and environmental ambition, the Commission will also present the Biodiversity Strategy for 2030, the new Industrial Strategy and Circular Economy Action Plan, the Farm to Fork Strategy for sustainable food and proposals for pollution-free Europe. Work will immediately start for upping Europe’s 2030 emissions targets, setting a realistic path to the 2050 goal.

Meeting the objectives of the European Green Deal will require significant investment. Achieving the current 2030 climate and energy targets is estimated to require €260 billion of additional annual investment, representing about 1.5% of 2018 GDP. This investment will need the mobilisation ofthe public and private sectors. The Commission will present in early 2020 a Sustainable Europe Investment Plan to help meet investment needs. At least 25% of the EU’s long-term budget should be dedicated to climate action, and the European Investment Bank, Europe’s climate bank, will provide further support. For the private sector to contribute to financing the green transition, the Commission will present a Green Financing Strategy in 2020.

Fighting climate change and environmental degradation is a common endeavour but not all regions and Member States start from the same point. A Just Transition Mechanism will support those regions that rely heavily on very carbon intensive activities. It will support the citizens most vulnerable to the transition, providing access to reskilling programmes and employment opportunities in new economic sectors.

In March 2020, the Commission will launch a ‘Climate Pact’ to give citizens a voice and role in designing new actions, sharing information, launching grassroots activities and show-casing solutions that others can follow.

The global challenges of climate change and environmental degradation require a global response. The EU will continue to promote its environmental goals and standards in the UN’s Biodiversity and Climate Conventions and reinforce its green diplomacy. The G7, G20, international conventions, and bilateral relationships will be used to persuade others to step up their efforts. The EU will also use trade policy to ensure sustainability and it will build partnerships with its neighbours in the Balkans and Africa to help them with their own transitions.
Next steps

The Commission invites the European Parliament and the European Council to endorse the Commission’s ambition for Europe’s future economy and the environment and to help realise it. The Commission will bring forward the measures announced in the European Green Deal roadmap.

Background

Climate change and environmental degradation present an existential threat to Europe and the world. To overcome this challenge, Europe needs a new growth strategy that transforms the Union into a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy where there are no net emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050, where economic growth is decoupled from resource use and where no one and no place is left behind.

The European Union already has a strong track record in reducing its emissions of greenhouse gases while maintaining economic growth. Emissions in 2018 were 23% lower than in 1990 while the Union’s GDP grew by 61% in the same period. But more needs to be done. The EU, given its extensive experience, is leading the way in creating a green and inclusive economy.

The Green Deal Communication sets the path for action in the months and years ahead. The Commission’s future work will be guided by the public’s demand for action and by undeniable scientific evidence as demonstrated most comprehensively by IPCC, IPBES, Global Resources Outlook and EEA SOER 2019 reports. Our proposals will be evidence-based and underpinned by broad consultation.

An overwhelming majority of Europeans consider that protecting the environment is important (95%). Almost 8 in 10 Europeans (77%) say that protection of the environment can boost economic growth. The results of the Eurobarometer survey concerning environmental attitudes of EU citizens confirm the wide public support for environmental legislation at EU level and EU funding for environmentally friendly activities.

Source: European Commission

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Proinso, a global leader in the solar energy market, will be present at the UK Pavilion from Monday the 2nd to Saturday the 7th of December. The UN Conference on Climate Change will be held in Madrid where more than 25,000 visitors are expected to attend. Institutional representatives, scientists, non-governmental organizations, business leaders, investors and governments from around the world will participate. The objective of this meeting is to share knowledge and seek actions that will lead to the full achievement of the Paris Agreement.

Proinso will present its latest projects carried out in Latin America and other regions as an example of its contribution to the fight against climate change and its effects.

Case studies:

 

  • 3 MWp Emsula, Honduras (PepsiCo). Largest solar PV project in Honduras at the time of commissioning.
  • 200 kWp La Paz, Mexico (Walmart). Commercial rooftop PV installation using ennexOS energy management platform.
  • 2 MW Bus Station in San Pedro (Honduras). One of the largest bus terminals in Central America.
  • 1.5 MW Quisqueya (Dominican Republic). Commercial rooftop PV installation using SMA inverters
  • 2.2 MWp Laguna, Philippines (New Zealand Creamery). Winner of the 2019 Asian Power Award.
  • 28 MWp Teknaf, Bangladesh. Winner of the 2018 Asian Power Award.
  • 492 kWp East Sumba, Indonesia. Winner of the 2018 Solar Power Portal Award.

Source: Proinso

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The energy transition requires more than 10 times solar and 5 times wind power in combination with other technology measures to limit global warming to well below 2°C and meet the targets of the Paris Agreement, according to DNV GL’s latest Energy Transition Outlook: Power Supply and Use report. The report finds that the energy transition is gathering pace more quickly than previously thought but the rate is still too slow to limit global temperatures rising by well below 2°C as set out in the Paris Agreement.

At the projected pace, DNV GL’s forecast indicates a world that is most likely to be 2.4°C warmer at the end of this century than in the immediate pre-industrial period. The technology already exists to curb emissions enough to hit the climate target. What is needed to ensure this happens are far-reaching policy decisions.

DNV GL recommends that the following technology measures are put in place to help close the emissions gap, the difference between the forecasted rate at which our energy system is decarbonizing and the pace we need to reach, to limit global warming to well below 2°C as set out by the Paris Agreement.

This combination of measures includes:

  1. Grow solar power by more than ten times to 5 TW and wind by 5 times to 3TW by 2030, which would meet 50% of the global electricity use per year.
  2. 50-fold increase in production of batteries for the 50 M electric vehicles needed per year by 2030, alongside investments in new technology to store excess electric energy and solutions that allow our electricity grids to cope with the growing influx of solar and wind power.
  3. Create new infrastructure for charging electric vehicles on a large scale.
  4. More than 1.5 MM$ of annual investment needed for the expansion and reinforcement of power grids by 2030, including ultra-high-voltage transmission networks and extensive demand-response solutions to balance variable wind and solar power.
  5. Increase global energy efficiency improvements by 3.5% per year within the next decade.
  6. Green hydrogen to heat buildings and industry, fuel transport and make use of excess renewable energy in the power grid.
  7. For the heavy industry sector: increased electrification of manufacturing processes, including electrical heating. Onsite renewable sources combined with storage solutions.
  8. Heat-pump technologies and improved insulation.
  9. Massive rail expansion both for city commuting and long-distance passenger and cargo transport.
  10. Rapid and wide deployment of carbon capture, utilization and storage installations.

The staggering pace of the energy transition continues. DNV GL’s report forecasts that by 2050 power generation from solar photovoltaic and wind energy will be 36,000 terawatt hours per year, more than 20 times today’s output. Greater China and India will have the largest share of solar energy by mid-century, with a 40% share of global installed PV capacity in China, followed by the Indian Subcontinent at 17%.

Globally, renewable energy will provide almost 80% of the world’s electricity by 2050 according to the report. The electrification will see increasing use of heat pumps, electric arc furnaces and an electric vehicle revolution, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2032 being electric vehicles.

Despite this rapid pace, the energy transition is not fast enough. DNV GL’s forecast indicates that, alarmingly, for a 1.5°C warming limit, the remaining carbon budget will be exhausted as early as 2028, with an overshoot of 770 Gt CO2 in 2050.

The report also demonstrates that the energy transition is affordable, the world will spend an ever-smaller share of GDP on energy. Global expenditure on energy is currently 3.6% of GDP but that will fall to 1.9% by 2050. This is due to the plunging costs of renewables and other efficiencies, allowing for greater investment to accelerate the transition.

DNV GL appeals to all 197 countries that signed the Paris Agreement to raise and realize increased ambitions for their updated Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020. In a snapshot of the first NDCs submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat, 75% currently refer to renewable energy, and 58% to energy efficiency. DNV GL calls on political leaders that both these percentages need to be 100% in the second NDCs.

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Public and private sector leaders are being urged to double annual investments in renewable energy to keep the world well below 2°C of warming, says a new report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) published ahead of the UN Climate Action Summit in New York. With just 11 years left for action to limit the effects of climate change, annual investments of USD 4.3 trillion in the energy sector until 2030 is the world’s most practical and readily available climate solution.

Annual renewable energy investments for the next decade need to double from around USD 330 billion to nearly USD 750 billion per year until 2030.

The findings form part of a new climate investment report by IRENA that highlights how cumulative global energy investments must pivot overwhelmingly towards low-carbon technologies including renewables. More than USD 18.6 trillion of planned fossil-fuel investments by 2050 need to be redirected to hold the line called for by the Paris Agreement and reaffirmed by the recent special report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Despite the urgency, current investment patterns show a stark mismatch with the pathway necessary to ensure a climate-safe future. Together, renewable energy and energy efficiency, along with deeper electrification, can deliver 90 per cent of the energy-related emission cuts needed under the Paris Agreement.

It’s possible to limit climate change and meet the world’s growing energy demand by rapidly accelerating the speed at which we deploy renewable energy,” said IRENA’s Director-General Francesco La Camera. “Only an energy transformation driven by renewables will allow us to meet the goals of the UN 2030 Agenda and Paris Agreement. Renewables are the only ready and available instrument we have to hold the 1.5°C line over the next 11 years.

In meeting climate goals, we can also boost economic growth and deliver on sustainable development with renewables,” continued Mr. La Camera. “But there is an urgent need to rethink long-term energy investment decisions to ensure they lead us to the sustainable future we need. Doubling investments in renewables offers us a tremendous opportunity to improve health, create jobs, deliver economic opportunity and tackle climate change. No other solution is as plausible.”

Transforming the energy system with renewables offers a more cost-effective path than climate inaction. Every dollar invested in the energy transition will offer returns of up to three to seven times in improved human health, lower climate related expenditure and reduced subsidies.

But accelerating renewable energy deployment requires policies that create an enabling environment to unlock investment and encourage economic development, the new report concludes. IRENA will work closer to the ground, facilitating projects and assisting countries in building attractive investment frameworks for renewables. The Agency will also enhance cooperation with the private sector, international financial institutions and multilateral organisations.

In support of the UN Secretary General’s call for decisive climate action, IRENA has launched a campaign that underpins renewable energy as a practical climate action solution. In co-operation with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Agency’s “Lead the change. It’s possible with renewables” campaign aims to inform about the potential of renewable energy technologies and in turn encourage concrete climate action.

Source: IRENA

The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), Eurelectric and Transport & Environment (T&E) are calling on the European institutions to facilitate a rapid roll-out of smart charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. This is a unique collaboration as it marks the first time that the EU auto industry, electricity sector and the green group have joined forces to push for a common goal.

E-mobility has a crucial role to play in decarbonising road transport and meeting Europe’s climate objective. As Brussels gears up for a new political term, the three associations are therefore urging policy makers to guarantee the ‘right to plug’ to all those who use an electric vehicle, so that everyone across Europe can get access to charging which should be as simple as refuelling today.

This will require a massive deployment of strategically located ‘smart charging’ infrastructure right across the EU. Smart infrastructure will enable drivers to charge without severely affecting, or overloading, Europe’s electricity grids. It provides clear benefits to customers, the power system, the automobile industry and society at large, the associations believe.

ACEA, Eurelectric and T&E signed this joint call to action today at ACEA’s ‘Leading the mobility transformation’ Summit in Brussels. On this occasion, the auto and electricity industries confirmed their commitment to making more focused investments in both vehicle technology and smart charging solutions.

Whether it is urban or motorway public charging, all barriers to infrastructure deployment and e-mobility growth must be removed. In order to make charging at home, work and on motorways easy and accessible for all drivers, policy makers should reform and strengthen key legislation, such as the soon to be revised EU alternative fuels law (AFID) and the EU buildings directive (EPBD). Existing EU funding instruments must also be better leveraged to speed up the roll-out of infrastructure, and other financial instruments should be targeted to unlock new solutions to improve coverage across all member states.

“The EU auto industry wants to work with all stakeholders to make zero-emission mobility a reality,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. “To convince more customers to make the switch to electric vehicles, we have to remove the stress associated with recharging. This means that everyone must have the option to recharge their vehicle easily, no matter where they live or where they want to travel to.”

“The race to the future is on. We must remove all barriers and make the shift to electric mobility as easy and convenient as possible. Every consumer should have a ‘right-to-plug’ – and the roll-out of public charging points must accelerate. By 2025, we need 1.2 million public charging points in Europe,” said Kristian Ruby, Secretary General of Eurelectric.

Julia Poliscanova, Clean Vehicles Director at T&E said: “A rapid shift to electric cars powered by clean electricity is essential if we want to halt dangerous global warming. Now that carmakers are preparing a wave of new and affordable electric models, we need to ensure the fast and easy deployment of charging points at home, at work and on the road so that charging an electric car becomes a completely hassle free experience for citizens across the EU.”

Source: ACEA

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The Global Wind Energy Council (GWEC) has launched the first edition of its Global Offshore Wind Report, which provides a comprehensive analysis of the prospects for the global offshore wind market, including forecast data, market-level analysis and a review of efforts to lower costs.

The global offshore market has grown by an average of 21% each year since 2013, reaching total installations of 23 GW. More than 4 GW of new capacity were installed each year in 2017 and 2018, making up 8% of the total new installations during both years. For the first time, China was the largest offshore market in 2018 in new installations, followed by the UK and Germany.

Based on government targets, auction results and pipeline data, GWEC expects to see 190 GW of capacity installed by 2030, but this does not represent the full potential of offshore wind. Many new countries are preparing to join the offshore wind revolution, while floating offshore wind represents a game-changing technological development that can add even more volume in the years to come.

The industry is continuing to make significant strides on cost-competitiveness, with an average LCOE of US$50/MWh within reach. This achievement increases the attractiveness of offshore wind in mature markets where several governments are discussing long-term climate targets that, if they are to be achieved, must seriously consider the contribution large-scale offshore wind can make. New offshore markets represent significant potential and if industry and governments can work together, as we have seen recently in the case of Taiwan, we can build the necessary policy frameworks at greater speed to ensure growth can be achieved sooner than later.

The report, GWEC Market Intelligence, provides a market outlook representing a “business-as-usual” (BAU) scenario which does not incorporate more technical development or further opportunities for offshore wind, and an upside scenario which captures the additional potential.

The BAU scenario expects double-digit growth for the global offshore market based on current policies and expected auctions and tenders. This scenario makes annual installations of 15 to 20 GW after 2025 realistic based on growth in China and other Asian markets, amounting to 165 GW of new installed capacity globally between now and 2030. This would bring the total installed capacity to nearly 190 GW.

The upside scenario captures additional potential such as the advancement of floating technology, increased cost competitiveness and therefore greater volume in mature markets, as well as the opening of new offshore markets. Based on this scenario, a more positive outlook of over 200 GW installed capacity between now and 2030 is possible, totalling approximately 220 GW installed capacity.

  • Europe: Short-term, the European offshore market will remain flat with few projects reaching installation and COD during 2020, however, the cost competitiveness of European offshore will remain a key driver for volume. The Sector Deal in the UK provides a stable outlook, while volumes for Germany have still not increased despite government’s awareness. Total installed capacity for the region under the BAU scenario is expected to be 78 GW by 2030.
  • Asia: The Asian offshore market including China is expected to become the largest offshore region globally with key growth markets including Taiwan, Vietnam, Japan, India and South Korea. Total installed capacity for the region under the BAU scenario is 100 GW by 2030.
  • US: The first installation of large-scale projects, expected between 2021 and 2023, brings total installations to 2 GW by 2025. There is potential for 10 GW total installations towards 2030 with an increasing experience and maturing of the local supply chain.

Iberdrola is making strides in its strategy to promote innovative sustainable mobility to fight climate change by acquiring a stake in Wallbox.

This company, Europe’s leading electric vehicle charging solutions company, has completed a 15 M€ round of capital injections – led by Iberdrola, with other co-investors and some of Wallbox’s current partners – which will allow it to reinforce its leadership and undertake global expansion.

The operation strengthens the business partnership between both companies and, fits into Iberdrola’s Sustainable Mobility Plan, which includes rolling out 25,000 electric vehicle charging stations throughout Spain by 2021 and in the company’s other global markets.

The sustainable mobility leader

Iberdrola intends to drive and lead the transition to sustainable mobility and the electrification of transport as an effective way to combat climate change.

The company has a Sustainable Mobility Plan that entails deploying 25,000 electric vehicle charging stations in Spanish homes, companies, urban and suburban areas with public access by 2021.The plan includes installing fast, super-fast and ultra-fast charging stations at least every 100 km on the country’s main motorways and highways during 2019, making it possible to drive all the way across Spain in an electric vehicle.

Perseo, collaboration with start-ups to design the energy of the future

Innovation is a strategic variable for Iberdrola and the main tool for guaranteeing the company’s sustainability, efficiency and competitiveness.

Iberdrola has been collaborating with start-ups for over ten years through its 70 M€ Perseo Programme. Perseo helps the company to gain access to the technologies of the future and fosters the development of a dynamic, global ecosystem of technology companies and entrepreneurs that will improve the sustainability of the energy model.

Through Perseo, Iberdrola has brought more than 2,000 emerging companies into its ecosystem, developed pilot projects, over 30 of them in the last two years, and invested in 15 start-ups in areas such as energy storage, drones, robotics and artificial intelligence.

Wallbox, working towards a change in the mobility paradigm

Wallbox plans to become a global electric vehicle charging solutions supplier (smart chargers and the myWallbox platform) and is still at the forefront of the sector with the launch of a home DC charger in the second half of the year.

The initiative will be top of its class due to its features and bidirectional technology. It has already been assessed by the market and agreements have already been signed with major car manufacturers. This new technology will bring a disruptive change to electric vehicle charging systems worldwide.

 

Source: Iberdrola

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Bosch is to be fully climate-neutral as early as next year. This will make Bosch the first major industrial enterprise to achieve this goal. In a bid to swiftly achieve carbon neutrality, Bosch will buy more green electricity in the near term and compensate for unavoidable CO2 emissions with carbon offsets. In the years to 2030, the company will gradually increase the share of renewable energy in the power that it generates and buys, and will invest a billion euros to boost its loca-tions’ energy efficiency.

Once Bosch achieves climate neutrality, it will no longer adversely affect carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. The company is thus making an impor-tant contribution to the Paris climate agreement ratified in 2015, which calls for global warming to be kept well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

A selection of exemplary Bosch projects

The Feuerbach plant – energy efficient thanks to people and machinery
Established in 1909, it has steadily and systematically modernized its facilities to contribute to the company’s overall energy efficiency.
Thanks to sessions that train and raise awareness in their team, energy require-ments are down more than 50% compared with 2007; its carbon emissions – re-lative to value creation – are down 47%.

Crunching data to conserve energy at Homburg

The Bosch location at Homburg, in the German state of Saarland, is edging ever closer to the vision of an energy efficient, self-learning plant. It has spared the world around 5,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide in the past two years and more than 23,000 tons since 2007.
Green roofs, photovoltaic systems, and carbon neutrality at Renningen
In Renningen, it has been carbon neutral since January 2019. Carbon offsets fully compensate for the carbon footprint of the natural gas burned by its heating system. The facility buys green electricity to cover its power needs.

Sustainable heating at Rodez

Reduce the site’s carbon footprint – that was what the team at Rodez in France set out to do when it started making plans as far back as 2009. The location now has a biomass heating plant, up and running since 2013. It burns wood chips ob-tained from local certified sustainable forestry resources.
Reducing the carbon footprint at Bidadi and Nashik, India, with power generated on site
Bosch India is pursuing carbon neutrality by tapping locally available, natural sources of energy. Spurred on by the idea of supplying the location with fully renewable power during daytime hours, the team at the Nashik location began installing its first photovoltaic systems in 2015.

Renewables as the main source of power for Bosch in Mexico

Mexico has revamped its energy policy. An energy reform launched there calls for the country to source 35 percent of the electricity from non-fossil fuels by 2024. With many hours of sunshine annually and high-wind regions, Mexico’s geography and climate would certainly support that goal, providing a solid foun-dation for change alongside committed support from government and business. Bosch Mexico was able to save 56,000 metric tons of CO2 in 2018 by switching to predominantly renewable energies.

Source: Bosch

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