Tags Posts tagged with "e-mobility"

e-mobility

The launch of the third generation of Renault’s flagship vehicle in its 100% electric collection is a major milestone in the Group’s strategy for large-scale electric vehicle development. Seven years after the release of what has become Europe’s best-selling urban electric car, New ZOE evolves in versatility, quality and technology. And it offers superior features, right from entry level, all while remaining affordable.

This evolution is immediately obvious. On the outside, New ZOE shows its personality without losing its distinctive fresh design. The interior has been revolutionized, with a fully redesigned instrument panel and dashboard for improved comfort.

On a technical level, New ZOE is both more autonomous, with a battery of 52 kWh lasting up to 390 kilometers in the WLTP* and has more recharging options thanks to the introduction of a direct current (DC) charge. With its more powerful 100 kW motor, New ZOE offers even more driving pleasure.

Lastly, New ZOE is equipped with many innovative features and connected Renault EASY CONNECT services. Driving aids, a 10-inch display, the Renault EASY LINK multimedia system, and a new urban mode are all designed to make everyday driving easier and more enjoyable.

A few numbers…

Nearly a decade has passed between the initial presentation of the ZOE Z.E concept at the end of 2009 and the launch of New ZOE. In this time, Renault has established itself as a pioneer and leader in electric mobility, driven in particular by the success of its flagship model.

Nearly 150,000 registrations by the end of May, 2019 and just as many drivers won over! ZOE sales have been growing steadily since its launch. Its cumulative sales make it the most prevalent electric vehicle on European roads. 18.2% market share in Europe in 2018. With nearly 40,000 new registrations, ZOE accounts for nearly one in five electric cars sold on the continent. It is number one in sales in Germany, Spain, and France, where it achieved a 54.9% market share over the year.
More than 60 awards across Europe. Regularly praised in the media, since 2014 ZOE has retained the title of “best electric car for under £30,000” awarded by the British magazineW hat Car?. ZOE’s successive developments have enabled it to achieve exceptional longevity.
More than 4 billion kilometers traveled. The flagship vehicle of Renault’s 100% electric range has achieved the equivalent of over 10,400 Earth-to-Moon journeys without emitting a single gram of CO2 during use!
One billion euro. In June 2018, Groupe Renault announced an investment plan to make France a center of excellence for electric vehicles within the Alliance. By 2022, it plans to double ZOE’s production capacity at the Renault plant in Flins, near Paris.
More than 40,000 people. This is the number of Groupe Renault employees involved in ZOE on a daily basis, from the sales network to engineering and assembly lines.

Range and charging: ZOE goes further and further

New ZOE has a Z.E. 50 battery which takes its range up to 390 kilometers on the WLTP*. It now also offers fast direct current charging, an addition to the alternating current charging options already available at home or on the street.

Renault’s work to continue at the forefront of increasingly high-performing battery development did not end with the introduction of the previous generation’s Z.E. 40 battery. The result: with 52 kWh, the battery Z.E. 50 for the New ZOE now offers a range of up to 390 km WLTP*, an increase of over 20%. This growth in energy capacity uses the same sized-battery, maintaining the vehicle’s comfortable habitability.

The new battery Z.E. 50 even has another advantage: its ability to deliver a higher current intensity contributes to the performance of the new R135 engine.

New ZOE also is the most versatile affordable electric vehicle when it comes to charging. With its ability to take up to 22 kW from each terminal, since its inception ZOE has been the fastest-charging electric vehicle on the most prevalent recharge devices in public spaces.

An additional innovation now complements this performance: the New ZOE battery can now also charge up to 50 kW on terminals that operate with direct current (DC). This new DC charge is suitable for long journeys, especially highways. New ZOE is the only affordable electric vehicle on the market to offer AC charging up to 22 kW and DC up to 50 kW.

Accompanied by custom connected services accessible via the MY Renault app, drivers are sure to always find the charging solutions they need, whether at home, work, in public parking areas or on the highway.

* WLTP driving range (Worldwide Harmonized Light vehicles Test Procedure, standardized cycle: 57% of urban journeys, 25% of suburban journeys, 18% of highway journeys), for the ZOE Life version. In the process of being approved.

Source: Groupe Renault

Efacec has just given a new step in the e-mobility field with the development of a new fast charger for electric vehicles, called QC45 Generation 2. This charging station is the 2nd generation of the company’s fast charger bestseller, with significant improvements in software and hardware domains.

With close to 4.000 fast charging equipment spread across five continents, mostly on the European and American continents, Efacec invests in the continuous evolution of its products to meet the current and future needs of the user of EV.

QC45 Generation 2 charger is characterized by usability, with better HMI design and improvement in the identification of the connectors; easy to maintain, with easier front access and to the components; new design, more urban, futuristic and high-tech and a layout that benefits the optimization of space, allowing the chargers to be placed side by side due the ventilation is no longer on the side as was the previous version of the QC45 charger.

The innovation and differentiating features visible in QC45 Generation 2 charger represent a new approach of Efacec in the fast charging field and will be present in all products of this line.

Source: Efacec

Electric vehicles are on track to dominate global sales of passenger cars and buses by 2040, and to encroach significantly on the market for vans and short-distance trucking, according to the latest forecast from research firm BloombergNEF (BNEF). Based on analysis of the evolving economics in different vehicle segments and geographical markets, BNEF’s Electric Vehicle Outlook 2019 shows electrics taking up 57% of the global passenger car sales by 2040, slightly higher than it forecast a year ago. Electric buses are set to hold 81% of municipal bus sales by the same date.

For the first time, BNEF has incorporated in its forecast detailed work on the commercial vehicle market. These projections show electric models taking 56% of light commercial vehicle sales in Europe, the U.S. and China within the next two decades, plus 31% of the medium commercial market.

Cuota de ventas anuales de vehículos eléctricos por segmento
EV share of annual vehicle sales by segment

Heavy trucks will prove the hardest segment for electrics to crack, with the latter’s sales limited to 19% in 2040. Their use case will mostly be in shorter-distance applications. However, conventional heavy trucks on long-haul routes will also face other, non-electric competition – from alternatives using natural gas and hydrogen fuel cells.

BNEF’s conclusions are stark for fossil fuel use in road transport. Electrification will still take time because the global fleet changes over slowly but, once it gets rolling in the 2020s, it starts to spread to many other areas of road transport.

The role of shared mobility services such as ride-hailing and car-sharing will be important in this evolving picture. These services account for less than 5% of all passenger miles travelled globally at the moment, but this is set to rise to 19% by 2040. The BNEF team does not expect autonomous driving to have an impact on global transport and energy patterns until the 2030s.

The main driver for the electrification trend over the next 20 years will be further sharp reductions in EV battery costs, making electric cars cheaper than internal combustion engine (ICE) alternatives by the mid-to-late 2020s in almost every market, on the basis of both lifetime costs and upfront costs. Since 2010, the average cost of lithium-ion batteries per kilowatt-hour has fallen by 85% on a mixture of manufacturing economies of scale and technology improvements.

The BNEF report sees China continuing to lead in electric cars, accounting for 48% of all passenger EVs sold in 2025 and 26% in 2040 when other markets are catching up. Europe pulls ahead of the U.S. as the number two EV market globally during the 2020s. Electrification in emerging markets will be much slower, leading to a fragmented global auto market.

The aggregate increase, however, will be impressive. BNEF expects passenger EV sales to rise from 2 million worldwide in 2018 to 28 million in 2030 and 56 million by 2040. Meanwhile conventional passenger vehicle sales fall to 42 million by 2040, from around 85 million in 2018. Policy support such as fuel economy regulations and China’s new energy vehicle mandate are expected to drive the EV market in the next 5-7 years before economics takes over the latter half of the 2020s.

Cuota de flota de vehículos eléctricos por segmento
EV share of vehicle fleet by segment

The oil, electricity and battery industries will all be impacted by the rise of EVs. A year ago, BNEF estimated their impact on road fuel demand at 7.3 million barrels per day by 2040. However, it has now nearly doubled this to 13.7 million barrels per day, partly because of new forecasts for electrification of the commercial vehicle sector and partly, paradoxically, because ICE fuel efficiency is expected to proceed more slowly than previously thought. That means that every EV displaces a conventional car that would have used a greater quantity of road fuel.

BNEF now estimates that EVs will add 6.8% to global electricity consumption in 2040, and that they will drive a surge in EV lithium-ion battery demand from 151 gigawatt-hours in 2019 to 1,748GWh in 2030. New mining capacity for all battery materials will need to come online to avoid this causing a supply crunch.

McKerracher said: “Transport is moving into a period of disruptive change, with many different factors coming into play. We have incorporated several new elements into our analysis, including an updated EV cost model that includes the cost of a home EV charger to reflect more accurately the costs individuals face to go electric; and a battery chemistry forecast for each of the new segments covered in this year’s report.”

Despite the radical changes afoot, the outlook for road transport emissions remains far from rosy. The BNEF team sees the size of the global on-the-road conventional passenger car fleet continuing to grow until 2030. This means that road vehicle emissions will continue to rise for the next decade, followed then by a sharp fall in the years before 2040, which will only return them to levels similar to 2018.

Source: BNEF

For most people, their personal energy revolution begins with the installation of a PV system on the roof of their home. This allows them not only to cover their domestic energy needs, but also to make use of the entire spectrum of options offered by energy sector integration thanks to the intelligent solutions from Fronius Solar Energy. The ultimate goal is to power an entire household exclusively from self-generated solar energy, which can also be used to heat water and for e-mobility. This helps to increase the rate of self-sufficiency and to more efficiently utilise the PV system. When it comes to e-mobility in particular, it is important to have a suitable overall concept comprising a PV system, energy storage system, hot water generation and a wallbox – in other words, a domestic charging station for electric cars, bringing a new level of meaning to ‘solar power’.

A personal energy revolution involves exploiting the entire spectrum of energy sector integration. Optimum energy management enables the highest possible rate of self-sufficiency to be achieved with self-generated solar energy. This increases profitability and the rate of self-consumption while simultaneously reducing costs. Alongside electricity and heat, mobility is the third major sector that can be powered with electricity from a user’s own roof using solutions from Fronius.

If you own an electric car, you’ll want to power it with solar energy,” explains Martin Hackl, Global Director Solar Energy at Fronius. “But you’re often not at home when the electricity from your domestic PV system is available.” This is where Fronius comes in: the solar energy experts are taking e-mobility to the next level and are making it possible to charge an electric car in the afternoon or evening with the electricity stored throughout the day. “It’s about having an energy solution that guarantees an electric car really is fuelled with green electricity,” adds Hackl. “To achieve this, you need to get the entire package right.

Fuelling a car with green electricity

Owners of electric cars essentially have three ways of charging their vehicles. The easiest, yet most ineffective method, is to simply plug the car into the socket or wallbox when power is required and use the energy available at that moment. This often only enables the user to achieve a slight increase in self-consumption, as a large proportion of the electricity needed is drawn from the public grid.

To charge the electric car’s battery intelligently, a Fronius inverter with an integrated energy management function and a compatible wallbox (charging station for the home) is required alongside the PV system on the roof. The inverter informs the wallbox when there is surplus electricity available, which then charges the electric car. Self-consumption can typically be increased by a further 20% in this way.

Dynamic charge control (the car is charged with precisely the amount of surplus electricity that is available at the given time) and an additional Fronius battery raise the rate of self-consumption up to almost 100%, depending on the system size and consumption behaviour. With this method, the energy management system sends the surplus electricity that has been produced throughout the day to a Fronius Solar Battery for temporary storage until it is later needed to fuel the car with solar power.

This ingenious method enables users to really get the most out of e-mobility,” says Hackl. “If you also upgrade your system with a Fronius Ohmpilot, which draws on surplus electricity to generate hot water, you will have a solution that makes the most economic sense and achieves the highest level of self-sufficiency.

Source: Fronius

CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel have signed an agreement for the joint development and industrialization of energy converters for organic redox flow batteries. The aim of both partners is to support electric mobility through the development of the charging infrastructure and offer the energy sector a sustainable and highly cost-efficient storage technology for a successful energy transition.

From the idea to the laboratory, then series production

The business idea for redox flow batteries with organic electrolytes derived from lignin (‘Organic Flow’) was already conceived in 2011 and since 2014, CMBlu has carried out intensive research and development. These batteries essentially consist of two tanks of liquid electrolyte and an energy converter, which consists of a large number of adjacent rows of cells and is therefore also referred to as a battery stack. The liquids are pumped through the battery stacks and is charged or discharged as required.

The technology developed by CMBlu has now reached the prototype stage. The further development and industrialization of the battery stack is regulated in the long-term cooperation agreement with Mann+Hummel. For this purpose Mann+Hummel has created a spin-off named i2M, which is dedicated to the development and commercialization of innovative technologies. In the next step Mann+Hummel will build a complete production line in an European plant. CMBlu will realize special pilot projects with reference customers in the next two years. Starting in 2021, CMBlu plans to market the first commercial systems.

Benefits of organic flow batteries

Similar to the principle of conventional redox flow batteries, CMBlu’s organic flow batteries store electrical energy in aqueous solutions of organic chemical compounds derived from lignin that are pumped through the energy converter, i.e. battery stack. The special feature of the flow batteries is that the capacity and electrical output can be scaled independently. The number of stacks defines the output of the batteries. A higher number of stacks multiplies the output. The capacity of the battery is only limited by the size of the tanks. This allows flexible customization to take into account the respective application area. For example, solar power can be stored for several hours and then fed into the grid at night.

In order to achieve cost-effective mass production, the most important components in the stack were adjusted to the organic electrolyte. In this process, almost the entire value chain for the stacks can be supplied locally. There is no dependency on imports from other countries. In addition, the battery stacks do not require rare-earth metals or heavy metals. The aqueous electrolytes in the system are not combustible or explosive and can be used safely.

Variety of applications in the grid

Organic flow batteries are suitable for numerous application areas in the power grid such as the intermediate storage of power from renewable energy generation or in connection with the balancing of demand peaks in industrial companies. An additional application area is the charging infrastructure required for electric mobility. The batteries enable a buffer storage to relieve power grids which do not have to be upgraded for additional loads. It enables simultaneous fast charging of electric vehicles. Ultimately, a decentralized charging network for electric vehicles will only be possible in connection with a high performance and scalable energy storage system.

Nature as a model for energy storage

The concept is based on the mode of energy in the human body. In the citric acid cycle the body also uses a redox reaction of organic molecules. CMBlu has now succeeded in applying this principle to large-scale storage of electrical energy. For this purpose the company use the mostly unused resource of lignin, which is readily available in unlimited quantities and accrues in amounts of millions of tons annually in the pulp and paper industry. CMBlu’s technology enables a very large and cost effective energy storage system. The battery stack is the core of the system and requires the highest quality and process reliability in the production process.

The manufacture of electrolytes includes a number of filtration steps, which Mann+Hummel performs using new special membranes. This technology further expands its product range and at the same time contributes to build the infractruture needed for electric vehicles.

Source: CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel

Manufacturers and suppliers of charging infrastructure, will be presenting their innovative product portfolios at Hannover Messe. One such company is Mennekes Elektrotechnik GmbH & Co. KG, based in the Sauerland region: “2019 is going to be a very exciting year for us,” says Alfred Vrieling, head of sales at Mennekes.“The American car maker Tesla will be launching its Model 3 on the German market, and we’ll see what happens then.” Vrieling is optimistic about the future, as he contemplates the mobility revolution that is just around the corner: “When electromobility really takes off, we’ll definitely be part of it.” As well as the domestic market, the technology company from Siegen has the whole of Europe in its sights, with Norway, Switzerland, Sweden and the Netherlands currently doing the most to promote electromobility.

But market growth depends on continuing expansion of the infrastructure. As well as developing suitable plugs and connectors, Mennekes has been concentrating for years on the installation and servicing of charging points. “You only make a journey in an electric car if you know it is easy to recharge the battery when you reach your destination,” says Vrieling, who drives an electric car himself, and therefore knows what he is talking about. “Before people will really embrace electric-powered travel, we need to build confidence and ensure greater continuity and availability.” And what we also need as a matter of urgency, argues Vrieling, are “fixed tariffs agreed between providers and operators of charging points.” As he goes on to point out, this will require some form of government legislation to avoid chaos in the future.

Talking of government involvement: the National Platform for Electromobility (NPE) has calculated that we will need 70,000 public charging points and 7,100 fast charging points in Germany by 2020. The Federal government has allocated 300 M€ of funding up until the year 2020 for the expansion of the public charging network to meet growing demand. What is still uncertain is how today’s power grid is going to cope with the rising demand, and how the necessary infrastructure can be made available both in major conurbations and in rural areas.

Once power grids been fully digitized, industry insiders are confident that the market for electromobility will grow rapidly. There is already a demand for intelligent technologies of the kind that firms such as ABB and Phoenix Contact GmbH & Co. KG will be displaying at the upcoming Hannover Messe in April. As more parking space is needed for recharging electric vehicles, real-world charging times will have to be as short as possible. This means that the battery packs of electric cars will need to be charged with a current of up to 500 kW in order to receive a sufficient charge for a range of 100 km within three to five minutes. “We will need sufficient energy to cope with these high charging capacities, and one way of doing this might be to provide local energy storage facilities,” explains Eva von der Weppen, press officer for Phoenix Contact.

This makes it possible to reduce the connected load of the charging park to the minimum required, so that there is always sufficient energy available at motorway service stations, for example. In addition, these charging stations must be able to deliver the high charging capacities to the electric vehicle safely and conveniently. We already offer a viable commercial solution, in the shape of our cooled HPC (High Power Charging) charging cables,” notes von der Weppen. This presupposes (she adds) “that the battery packs in electric cars can take the high charging capacities, and that they have been engineered for a sufficient number of charging cycles to ensure a long service life. Further work is needed to resolve these technical issues.

ABB is also working on the charging infrastructure. At last year’s Hannover Messe, ABB unveiled its Terra High Power charging station, with a charging capacity of up to 350 kW. This is capable of delivering a charge sufficient for a range of 200 km in just eight minutes – which makes the latest top-of-the-range model from ABB ideally suited for use in motorway service areas and filling stations. As a result, this product from ABB is being installed in growing numbers worldwide so that there are already thousands of fast charging stations in operation in 60 countries. This makes ABB one of the world’s leading suppliers of DC charging solutions – charging technologies designed for the electrification not only of cars, but also of buses, trucks, ships, railways and cable cars.

Hannover Messe is the perfect place for ABB and other specialist exhibitors large and small to get talking with customers from all over the world, and thus to drive the mobility revolution fueled by renewable energy.

Source: Hannover Messe

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FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

E-mobility has been emerging into our lives for years and although it has always seemed that its arrival would take place at some indeterminate time in the near future, the electric vehicle has recently rocked the entire industrial sector as well as public opinion. The waiting is over. The electric vehicle is a reality, with new models arriving every few months, offering attractive designs, new battery capacities, greater ranges and prices, which although still higher than their thermal counterparts, are relatively contained and justifiable given the performance and the total cost of ownership or the cost throughout the total life of the vehicle…By David Iriarte, Key Account Manager EM, Ingeteam.

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FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

According to the UN and the IEA, the primary expectations for 2040 are that the economy will be 40% more efficient; global electricity will grow by 60%; 40% of the world’s energy will be generated from renewables; and 55% of vehicles will be electric. Moreover, the UN estimates that by 2050, 68% of the global population will live in urban areas, a figure that requires addressing the heightened need for infrastructures, energy and services for the citizen. Within this context and through the commitment of Enel for 2050, Endesa sets out to become an emissions-free company. The response of Endesa to the change in paradigm being experienced by the sector is Endesa X, a new business line that will develop and offer new and advanced, added value energy solutions to meet the needs of Spanish companies, cities and homes.

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FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

Last October, Groupe Renault unveiled its EZ-ULTIMO at the Paris Motor Show. This is the latest concept car in its range of robo-vehicles. The presentation of this vehicle has enabled Renault to reaffirm its vision of urban mobility of the future. The Drive the Future strategic plan emphasises the vision of Groupe Renault as regards mobility of the future. Renault aims to provide sustainable mobility for all, hence its commitment to connected, autonomous and shared e-mobility…

FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

In line with the Mexican strategy in the interest of sustainable mobility , Mexico continues to make progress in e-mobility. In 2018, the country advanced in two areas: first in drawing up a Technological Road Map towards Sustainable Mobility; and second, in the regulation that enables the small-scale sale of electricity…By Leonardo Beltrán Rodríguez, Former Deputy Secretary of Energy from Mexico.

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