Tags Posts tagged with "energy demand"

energy demand

0 5

Today, 75% of Europeans live in urban areas and this is expected to rise. Already we are facing an increasing amount of challenges in our cities related to poor air quality, energy poverty, and highly inefficient buildings. The building stock accounts for 49% of Europe’s energy demand and 36% of CO2 emissions at EU level – we need to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy and invest significantly in improving the energy efficiency of our buildings if Europe is to become carbon-neutral.

Against this backdrop, SolarPower Europe has launched the Solar4Buildings campaign –calling for solar on all new and renovated buildings in the EU to help limit climate change.

In the EU, more than 90% of roofs go unused, when they could help mitigate climate change by having solar installed on them. Installing solar on all new buildings and those undergoing renovations makes perfect sense as it could reduce buildings’ CO2 emissions significantly whilst producing clean electricity.

What’s more, Europe’s rooftops have huge solar potential. According to the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, rooftops in the EU can produce 680 TWh of solar power annually – which is equal to one quarter of the current electricity consumption in the EU.

Solar is one of the most affordable energy sources today. The price of solar panels has dropped by more than 96% since 2000 and is expected to fall even further. By installing solar, European households can also save money on their electricity bills and have access to reliable and clean energy – that makes for a greener future. In Germany, a typical four-person family household with an average annual electricity consumption of 3,600 kWh could save more than €500 each year, if equipped with an average size rooftop system.

Despite these facts, buildings are still regularly being constructed without solar. Now it is time to install solar on all these roofs – on residential, commercial, industrial and public buildings.

SolarPower Europe will present the Solar4Buildings campaign to the new European Commission starting in November and as part of its input to President-elect Ursula von der Leyen’s ‘Green Deal’.

Help support the campaign by signing the petition calling for EU legislation to have solar on all new and renovated buildings in the European Union!

Source: SolarPower Europe

0 3

Inerco Ingeniería, Tecnología y Consultoría enters a Strategic Business Alliance Agreement with the energy storage company SaltX Technology – listed on Nasdaq First North Premier –. The partners enter a joint development plan where the first step is to build a pre-commercial pilot in Megawatt scale during 2020.

Inerco has a strong reputation within thermal power generation engineering and technology. The Energy Storage system to be designed will be charged using a non-dispatchable renewable energy or high temperature waste heat. This system will also allow a controlled discharge in periods of high energy demand, as decarbonised high temperature heat (producing steam for electricity generation or heat for direct industrial use).

The goal is to lower the dependency on fossil fuels and increase the flexibility of thermal and renewable power plants. The partners have also agreed to a road map for commercialising the solution. The target markets for the alliance will initially be Spain, Portugal, Central and South America and Mexico. INERCO will be responsible for the development of the first pilot and will also lead the funding of it.

“Inerco finds relevant advantages in nanocoated salts for thermochemical energy storage, which have led us to establish a strong partnership with SaltX. The future of the energy sector undoubtedly implies the use of robust and cost-effective energy storage solutions to be integrated with hybridised conventional and renewable energy sources. SaltX´s nanocoated salts present intrinsic advantages with respect to systems based on other energy storage principles, such as those using molten salts, concrete, or electric batteries, due to their improved energy efficiency, management and safety characteristics. With this technological approach INERCO is convinced about finding competitive solutions for the new decarbonised energy scenario related to both power generation and energy intensive industries”, says Pedro Marín, CEO of Inerco.

Source: Inerco

Observatorio Mundial de los Mercados de la Energía de Capgemini 2018

Capgemini has today published the twentieth edition of its annual study, the World Energy Markets Observatory (WEMO) report, created in partnership with De Pardieu Brocas Maffei and Vaasa ETT. The study reveals China’s role as a leading worldwide player in technology, equipment and Utilities ownership, and highlights that global economic growth has increased energy demand and leaves long-term climate change targets in question.

This is despite a year that saw both fast-rising European carbon prices and falling renewable energy costs. Meanwhile, fossil fuel price increases have led to price rebounds in wholesale electricity and gas markets, notably in Europe. In turn, Utilities are showing improved financial health, and the overall landscape is changing. They are adapting their business models with new technologies such as IoT, AI, chatbots, and blockchain as competition from new players emerges. All segments of the value chain are impacted by digital transformation, from client relationships and operational processes, through to grids and interactive services.

The four main findings of the 2018 edition of the World Energy Markets Observatory report are:

1. China, the world’s second largest consumer of energy, leading emitter of Greenhouse Gases (GHG), significant energy equipment supplier, and key player in critical resources, has also become an important investor in electricity companies

Energy requirements are constantly growing in China, which in 2017 increased its imports of Liquid Natural Gas by 46%, making it responsible for 30% of the growth in global demand. Pollution levels remain a concern and China is the world’s biggest emitter of GHG. China has a long-term policy of developing equipment for domestic usage first before selling it internationally. It is aggressively exporting coal-fired power plants (with 700 currently under construction), photovoltaic solar panels (of which it was responsible for almost half of newly installed worldwide capacity), and wind turbines. According to the report, electricity storage and electric vehicles, as well as nuclear reactors, are likely to be the next wave of Chinese equipment exportations. China also has a dominant share (95%) in the worldwide production of highly sought-after rare metals and rare earth elements needed for energy transition. Finally, China’s decade-long dynamic acquisition policy, mainly in Africa, South America and Asia, has now extended to Europe’s electricity networks and utilities.
Capgemini Press Release

2. Economic growth puts into question climate change objectives but has in turn driven electricity and gas wholesale market price rebounds, improving Utilities’ financial health

After three years during which GHG emissions had stagnated, in 2017 they increased by 1.4 percent, driven by economic growth that stimulated increased energy demand. The already fragile climate change objectives of the Paris 2015 Climate Accord could be threatened, despite the significant rise in carbon prices (up in Europe from €5 per ton in early 2017 to €20 early September 2018), resulting from the rebounding global economy and the European Union measures.

According to Colette Lewiner, Energy and Utilities senior advisor at Capgemini: “In 2017, a stronger economy meant Greenhouse Gas emissions rose for the first time in several years; as a result of the 2050 climate change objectives may well not be met. The European Union has taken some measures, but they are insufficient to reach a meaningful carbon price, of around €55/ton. For this to be achieved, carbon floor prices would be needed at either regional or national levels.

3. Renewable energy and storage prices continued to decrease, but tech limitations and cost of development means full renewable generation is far off for the majority of countries

During the past 12 months, the costs of renewable energies have continued to fall -20% for solar PV): onshore wind and utility scale PV costs are becoming competitive almost everywhere (without including extra grid costs) compared to most traditional electricity generation resources. Battery costs are following the same downward trend. This combination could lead some countries, such as Denmark, to set goals for a 100% renewable generation mix. However, at the large country or state level, even with battery storage, this type of grid is not manageable at present because of limitations in the technology, intermittency management, and huge implementation costs.

4. The Utilities landscape continues to evolve along with the renewed financial health of industry players, while new challenges emerge

A slight improvement in the financial positions of Utilities had been reported, notably in Europe, thanks to wholesale electricity and gas market price rebounds and transformation achievements of industry players. This situation has led to a landscape transformation and merger and acquisition activities, each country having its own transformation path: German utilities are concentrating on value chain segments, the UK is correcting some liberalization retail market consequences with new regulations, Asian markets are starting the deregulation process, and new players are entering the markets everywhere.

Perry Stoneman, Head of the Energy, Utilities & Chemicals sector at Capgemini, comments: “We observe Oil and Gas majors playing in the retail and renewables markets with significant resources and ambitions. Meanwhile, the Utilities landscape is changing fast. All segments of the value chain are impacted by digital transformation, from client relationships and operational processes, through to grids and interactive services, with a huge potential to decrease costs. Utility incumbents need to accelerate their transformations and step up their focus on new service-based business models as competition from different domains including new entrants, oil majors, retailers, and GAFAM (Acronym for the five most popular US BigTechs: Google, Apple, Facebook, Amazon and Microsoft
Capgemini Press Release, is increasing
.”

The World Energy Markets Observatory is an annual publication by Capgemini that monitors the main indicators of the electricity and gas markets in Europe, North America, Australia and South-East Asia, and reports on the developments and transformations in these sectors. This 20th edition, which is drafted mainly from public data combined with Capgemini’s expertise in the energy sector, refers to data from 2017 and winter 2017/2018. Special expertise on regulation, climate challenges, and customer behavior has been provided by research teams at De Pardieu Brocas Maffei and VaasaETT.

Source: Capgemini

0 1

The first offshore wind farm one hundred per cent designed and operated by a Spanish company

Iberdrola has officially cut the ribbon on Wikinger offshore wind farm, one of the company’s most iconic power plants in the world, having invested over €1.4 billion. Wikinger is fully operational and its 350 MW are connected to the German grid, supplying efficient renewable energy to 350,000 homes (representing some 20% of the energy demand of the state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern). This flow of clean energy will have a positive environmental impact since it displaces the emission of nearly 600,000 tons of CO2 per year.

The Wikinger project marks Iberdrola’s entry into the German electricity market, where it has just been awarded the construction of two other offshore wind farms: Baltic Eagle (476 MW) and Wikinger Süd (10 MW). Together with Wikinger, these three wind farms, located off the island of Rügen, will give rise
to the largest offshore wind complex in the Baltic Sea, with a total installed capacity of 836 MW and a combined investment of €2.5 billion.

Wikinger is the first offshore wind farm to be designed and operated one hundred per cent by a Spanish company. It has consolidated Iberdrola as Europe’s leading company in renewable energy, capable of developing projects in markets as competitive as Germany and meeting the demanding planning conditions set by German authorities. In addition, it has served to boost the entire supply chain, benefiting companies across Europe, including Navantia and Windar.

This project has come to fruition thanks to the multidisciplinary and multinational composition of the team set up by Iberdrola and its network of first-rate international suppliers and contractors. Over 2,000 employees from 20 different countries participated in this milestone project. Iberdrola has had to overcome the technological challenges inherent to this type of work and the difficulties arising from the extreme weather conditions in the Baltic Sea.

Wikinger, a mark for Iberdrola

Located off the north-east coast of the German island of Rügen, Wikinger brings together the main themes of Iberdrola’s strategy: strong investment in the development of renewable energies, commitment to reducing emissions, technological innovation, international growth, opening of new markets and business lines to its suppliers, and an important boost for the European naval industry.

To build the project, 280 piles were installed. Measuring 40 metres in length by 2.5 m in diameter, and a unit weight of 150 t, they were all built by Spanish company Windar. A total of 70 foundations were laid on them, each weighing 620 t, manufactured by Bladt Industries in Lindo (Denmark) and Navantia, at its shipyard in Fene (Spain).

The 5-MW Siemens Gamesa AD 5-135 wind turbines were manufactured in the company’s plants in Bremerhaven and Stade (Germany). These are the wind turbines with the highest power rating and largest dimensions that Iberdrola has installed thus far. With a total height of 165 m, they are made up of a 75-m high tower, a 222-t nacelle and a 135-m diameter rotor, with each blade measuring 67 m long.

Finally, one of Wikinger’s key pieces of infrastructure is the Andalucía offshore substation, which will be used jointly by Iberdrola and 50Hertz, an electricity system operator in Germany. Weighing around 8,500 tonnes, the energy heart of the wind farm was also built by Navantia in Puerto Real in southern Spain.

Commitment to offshore wind power

Offshore wind energy is one of the keys to Iberdrola’s growth and the company has undertaken notable projects in this sector in the United Kingdom, Germany and France. These large investments will help advance the transition to a decarbonised energy model and combat climate change. These are the main projects underway:

West of Duddon Sands (WoDS): Located in the Irish Sea, WoDS was the first offshore wind farm the Iberdrola Group was involved in. It was developed by the company in consortium with Orsted and came into operation in 2014. It has 389 MW capacity and the investment was over £1.6 billion.

East Anglia One (EAO): Mega-project currently under construction in British waters in the North Sea, it will become one of the world’s largest offshore wind farms when it starts operating in 2020. It will involve an estimated investment of £2.5 billion and have a capacity of 714 MW.

Saint-Brieuc: This 496-MW facility will be located 20 km off the coast of Brittany in northern France, about 100 kilometres from the city of Rennes. It will have 62 Siemens-Gamesa turbines, with 8 MW unit capacity.

Vineyard Wind: Iberdrola, through Vineyard Wind, recently received authorisation from the Massachusetts Electric Distribution Companies (EDC) to construct a wind farm off the north-east coast of the United States. The project, which represents the company’s first large-scale offshore wind farm venture in that country will have 800 MW capacity.

Source: Iberdrola

Rapid electrification of energy demand and the rise of energy from wind and solar sources will lead to massive growth of the world’s electricity transmission and distribution systems. This is one of the main conclusions of DNV GL’s Energy Transition Outlook 2018: Power Supply and Use report, which provides an outlook of the global energy landscape up to 2050.

The report forecasts continuing rapid electrification, with electricity’s share of the total energy demand expected to more than double to 45% in 2050. This is driven by substantial electrification in the transport, buildings, and manufacturing sectors. In the transport sector, the uptake of private electric vehicles (EVs) will continue to escalate rapidly, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2027 in Europe expected to be EVs.

The surge in global electricity production will be powered by renewable sources accounting for an estimated 80% of global electricity production in 2050. As the costs for wind and solar continue to fall, those two energy sources are set to meet most of the electricity demand, with solar PV delivering 40% of electricity generation and wind energy 29%.

The rapid electrification will lead to major expansion of electricity transmission and distribution systems both in the length and capacity of transmission lines. DNV GL predicts that the total installed power line length and capacity will more than triple by 2050.

The system operators’ tasks will become substantially more complex; yet there may well be less energy flowing across the networks, resulting in fixed costs becoming a greater part of the bill.

High fractions of solar and wind will create a need for increased use of market mechanisms and changes to the electricity market fundamentals in many countries. This requires major regulatory intervention. Market based price signals are crucial to incentivize innovation and develop economically efficient flexibility options.

Despite major expansion of high-capital-cost renewables and electricity networks, energy will become more affordable. It is predicted that the total cost of energy expenditure, as a share of global GDP, will fall from 5.5% to 3.1%, a drop by 44%. Absolute energy expenditure will still grow by 30% over the forecast period, to USD 6 trillion/yr. DNV GL foresees a shift in costs, from operational expenditure, principally fuel, to capital expenditure. From 2030, more capital expenditures will go into electricity grids and wind and solar than into fossil-fuel projects.

Despite the positive outlook on the expansion of renewable energy and the electrification of key sectors, the energy transition will not be fast enough to meet global climate targets. In fact, DNV GL found that the first emission-free year will be 2090, if the energy transition continues at the pace predicted in its report.

Source: DNV GL

0 0

Fluctuations in the prices of fossil fuels, the need to address climate change and the growing energy demand, present the current energy model with major challenges. To address them at the same time as achieving high levels of efficiency, new hybrid energy models based on renewable energy are emerging that aim to make a better use of resources and facilitate an energy supply over a longer period. This is the case of CSP-biomass plants designed to produce power using ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) technology. Innergy is active throughout the entire value chain of an energy project with biomass, providing services that range from the development, production and sale of heat and automation generation equipment to O&M. The company enjoys extensive experience in all types of biomass, industrial biomass boilers and both ORC and steam technology, qualifying it to support biomass for this type of energy solutions.

This type of hybrid energy solution is so interesting because CSP plants need sunlight to shine directly onto their mirrors in order to produce electricity. On cloudy days these plants remain stopped, not generating power and requiring energy from other sources. On the other hand, there is energy generation equipment that uses biomass, a sustainable fuel source that is not subject to weather phenomena, but which, despite existing in large quantities, must be used in a controlled and sustainable manner.

By combining both types, solar power is used on clear days, with the cloudy days covered by energy originating from biomass. This ensures that the plant can operate 365 days a year as it is energy independent from monopolies and large corporations, as well achieving price stability. Read more…

Article published in: FuturENERGY March 2018

The 2018 edition of BP’s Energy Outlook launched in London today by Spencer Dale, group chief economist, and Bob Dudley, group chief executive, considers the forces shaping the global energy transition out to 2040 and the key uncertainties surrounding that transition. The speed of the energy transition is uncertain and the new Outlook considers a range of scenarios. Much of the narrative in the Outlook is based on the Evolving Transition scenario.

This scenario, which assumes that government policies, technologies and societal preferences evolve in a manner and speed similar to the recent past, expects:

• Fast growth in developing economies drives up global energy demand a third higher.
• The global energy mix is the most diverse the world has ever seen by 2040, with oil, gas, coal and non-fossil fuels each contributing around a quarter.
• Renewables are by far the fastest-growing fuel source, increasing five-fold and providing around 14% of primary energy.
• Demand for oil grows over much of Outlook period before plateauing in the later years.
• Natural gas demand grows strongly and overtakes coal as the second largest source of energy.
• Oil and gas together account for over half of the world’s energy.
• Global coal consumption flatlines and it seems increasingly likely that Chinese coal consumption has plateaued.
• The number of electric cars grows to around 15% of the car parc, but because of the much higher intensity with which they are used, account for 30% of passenger vehicle kilometers.
• Carbon emissions continue to rise, signalling the need for a comprehensive set of actions to achieve a decisive break from the past.

Fuel analysis

By 2040, oil, gas, coal and non-fossil fuels each account for around a quarter of the world’s energy. More than 40% of the overall increase in energy demand is met by renewable energy.

Oil demand grows over much of the Outlook, although it plateaus in the later years. All the demand growth comes from emerging economies. The growth in supply is driven by US tight oil in the early part of the Outlook, with OPEC taking over from the late 2020s as Middle East producers adopt a strategy of growing market share. The transport sector continues to dominate global oil demand, accounting for more than half of the overall growth. Most of the growth in energy demand from transport, which flattens off towards the end of the Outlook, comes from non-road (largely air, marine, and rail) and trucks, with small increases from cars and motorbikes. After 2030, the main source of growth in the demand for oil is from non-combusted uses, particularly as a feedstock for petrochemicals.

Natural gas grows strongly over the period, supported by increasing levels of industrialization and power demand in fast-growing emerging economies, continued coal-to-gas switching, and the increasing availability of low-cost supplies in North America and the Middle East. By 2040, the US accounts for almost one quarter of global gas production, and global LNG supplies will more than double. The sustained growth in LNG supplies greatly increases the availability of gas around the world, with LNG volumes overtaking inter-regional pipeline shipments in the early 2020s.

Coal consumption flatlines over the Outlook period, with falls in China and the OECD offset by increasing demand in India and other emerging Asian economies. China remains the largest market for coal, accounting for 40% of global coal demand to 2040.

BP_ENERGY_OUTLOOK-2Renewable energy grows over 400% and accounts for over 50% of the increase in global power generation. This strong growth is enabled by the increasing competitiveness of wind and solar. Subsidies are gradually phased out by the mid-2020s, with renewable energy increasingly able to compete against other fuels. China is the largest source of growth, adding more renewable energy than the entire OECD combined, with India becoming the second largest source of growth by 2030.

Sector analysis

Power accounts for nearly 70% of the increase in primary energy demand. The mix of fuels used in power generation is set to shift materially, with renewable energy gaining share more quickly than any energy source in history, increasing from 7% today to around a quarter by 2040. Even so, coal remains the largest source of energy in power generation by 2040.

Transport energy demand grows by only 25% despite total demand for transportation more than doubling, reflecting accelerating gains in vehicle efficiency. The transport sector continues to be dominated by oil (around 85% in 2040), despite increasing penetration of alternative fuels – particularly natural gas and electricity.

This year’s Outlook argues that the penetration of electricity in the transport sector is best measured by considering both the number of electric vehicles (EVs) and how intensively each vehicle is used. In the Evolving Transition scenario, the share of EVs in the global car parc reaches around 15% by 2040 – more than 300 million cars in a car parc of almost 2 billion. However, the share of passenger car kilometres powered by electricity, which also takes account of the intensity with which electric cars are used, is over 30%. The Outlook shows how the interaction of fully-autonomous cars with shared mobility has the potential to substantially boost the intensity with which electric cars are driven.

BP_ENERGY_OUTLOOK-4A key uncertainty in the period to 2040 is the speed with which sales of electric cars increases. To gauge the significance of this uncertainty, the Outlook considers a scenario in which there is a worldwide ban on the sales of cars with internal combustion engines (ICE) from 2040. This scenario reduces liquid fuel demand by around 10 million barrels a day relative to the Evolving Transition scenario but, even so, the level of oil demand in 2040 in the ‘ICE ban’ scenario is higher than in 2016.

Industrial energy demand, including both combusted and non-combusted uses of fuels, accounts for around half of the increase in energy consumption.

Improving efficiency drives slower growth in industrial energy demand (excluding the non-combusted sector), in large part driven by China’s transition towards a less energy-intensive service and consumer-facing sectors. Some of China’s slowing growth is likely to be displaced to lower-income economies, including India and Africa.

Non-combusted use of fuels, particularly as feedstocks for petrochemicals, are the fastest growing source of overall demand for oil and gas. Non-combusted use of fuels grows at almost twice the rate of other industrial uses, although increasing environmental pressures on the use of some products, particularly single-use plastics and packaging, dampens growth quite materially relative to past trends. Oil accounts for nearly two-thirds of the growth in non-combusted use of energy, with natural gas providing much of the remainder.

Regional analysis

All the growth in energy consumption is in fast-growing developing economies: China and India account for half of the growth in global energy demand to 2040. Through the period China’s energy growth slows as it transitions to a more sustainable pattern of economic growth. India’s slowing in demand growth is less pronounced and by the early 2030s it overtakes China as the world’s fastest growing market for energy. In the latter stages of the Outlook, Africa also plays an increasingly important role in driving energy demand, contributing more to global demand growth from 2035 to 2040 than China.

Carbon emissions

In the Outlook’s Evolving Transition scenario, carbon emissions rise by 10% by 2040. While this is far slower than the rates seen in the past 25 years, it remains higher than the sharp decline thought to be necessary to achieve the Paris commitments.

As such, the Outlook also explores an Even Faster Transition scenario, which has the same broad decline in carbon emissions as the International Energy Agency’s ‘Sustainable Development Scenario’ where carbon emissions fall by almost 50% by 2040. Most of the additional abatement of emissions in this scenario, relative the Evolving Transition scenario, come from the power sector, which is almost entirely decarbonized by 2040.

Source: BP

0 0

The resurgence in oil and gas production from the United States, deep declines in the cost of renewables and growing electrification are changing the face of the global energy system and upending traditional ways of meeting energy demand, according to the IEA’s World Energy Outlook 2017. A cleaner and more diversified energy mix in China is another major driver of this transformation.

Over the next 25 years, the world’s growing energy needs are met first by renewables and natural gas, as fast-declining costs turn solar power into the cheapest source of new electricity generation. Global energy demand is 30% higher by 2040 – but still half as much as it would have been without efficiency improvements. The boom years for coal are over-in the absence of large-scale carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS)-and rising oil demand slows down but is not reversed before 2040 even as electric-car sales rise steeply.

WEO-2017, the International Energy Agency’s flagship publication, finds that over the next two decades the global energy system is being reshaped by four major forces: the United States is set to become the undisputed global oil and gas leader; renewables are being deployed rapidly thanks to falling costs; the share of electricity in the energy mix is growing; and China’s new economic strategy takes it on a cleaner growth mode, with implications for global energy markets.

Solar PV is set to lead capacity additions, pushed by deployment in China and India, meanwhile in the European Union, wind becomes the leading source of electricity soon after 2030.

This year, WEO-2017 includes a special focus on China, where economic and energy policy changes underway will have a profound impact on the country’s energy mix, and continue to shape global trends. A new phase in the country’s development results in an economy that is less reliant on heavy industry and coal.

At the same time, a strong emphasis on cleaner energy technologies, in large part to address poor air quality, is catapulting China to a position as a world leader in wind, solar, nuclear and electric vehicles and the source of more than a quarter of projected growth in natural gas consumption. As demand growth in China slows, other countries continue to push overall global demand higher – with India accounting for almost one-third of global growth to 2040.

The shale oil and gas revolution in the United States continues thanks to the remarkable ability of producers to unlock new resources in a cost-effective way. By the mid-2020s, the United States is projected to become the world’s largest LNG exporter and a net oil exporter by the end of that decade.

This is having a major impact on oil and gas markets, challenging incumbent suppliers and provoking a major reorientation of global trade flows, with consumers in Asia accounting for more than 70% of global oil and gas imports by 2040. LNG from the United States is also accelerating a major structural shift towards a more flexible and globalized gas market.

WEO-2017 finds it is too early to write the obituary of oil. Global oil demand continues to grow to 2040, although at a steadily decreasing pace – while fuel efficiency and rising electrification bring a peak in oil used for passenger vehicles, even with a doubling of the car fleet to two billion vehicles. But other sectors – namely petrochemicals, trucks, aviation, and shipping – drive up oil demand to 105 million barrels a day by 2040.

While carbon emissions have flattened in recent years, the report finds that global energy-related CO2 emissions increase slightly by 2040, but at a slower pace than in last year’s projections. Still, this is far from enough to avoid severe impacts of climate change.

The World Energy Outlook does not offer a forecast of what the energy system will look like but instead presents various projections to 2040 based on different policy assumptions, in order to give policy makers the tools to decide what path to follow. The main case is called the New Policies Scenario, and it models current and announced energy policies, including those in the Paris Agreement. This year, the report introduces the Sustainable Development Scenario, which offers an integrated way to achieve a range of goals: climate stabilization, cleaner air and universal access to modern energy.

Policy, technological advances and cost reductions have made a cleaner energy mix a reality, and by 2030, Europe is to meet 27% of its total energy demand with renewable energy, and increase its energy efficiency by 30%.

Governments, regions and cities across the globe have committed to reducing carbon emissions in alignment with the COP 21 Paris accord, and many pledges have been made to become solely reliant on renewables by 2040/2050. However, significant transformation and investment across the extended energy value chain, from oil and gas operators, through to power generators, distributors and electricity consumers, needs to take place at a continued rapid pace, to meet policymaker’s targets.

 

Global Power & Energy Exhibition (GPEX), co-located with Gastech, will take place in Barcelona in September 2018, to provide solutions for businesses adapting to the energy transition. The event will play host to 30,000 business and technical thought-leaders, to address important commercial, regulatory, geopolitical and technical issues impacting the future of the power and energy industry, as well as focus on citizens, as distributed energy generation agents in this new energy model.

Stewart Bundock, Event Director at organiser dmg::events, says: “We are living in truly transformative times, and few industries are facing more change than the global energy sector. A combination of policy and emerging technologies are changing the way that power is produced, distributed and consumed, and revolutionising the landscape over the years and decades ahead. But integration is a vast and complex undertaking that requires cohesion and knowledge sharing.

An innovative, technology-focused exhibition with 200 international exhibitors, will feature four dedicated industry zones with technical seminar theatres, namely Power Generation, Energy Storage, Grid Evolution, Energy Efficiency & Sustainability. The exhibition will feature key sectors and technologies for the energy transition, including electrical mobility, photovoltaic self-consumption, Near Zero consumption and Energy Positive buildings.

The Global Power & Energy Leaders’ Summit – a strategic, c-level conference – will deliver a thought-provoking programme to address the theme of the global energy transition, promoting collaboration among gas, power and energy CEOs and political influencers, as well as new business models linked to energy transition, including energy aggregators and cooperatives. In addition, the Utility CxO Summit will examine how digital technologies are transforming the utility sector, and empowering citizens as new energy producers.

Bundock continues: “Our mission is to gather the people, ideas, technologies and best practices so that policymakers and the energy industry can fulfil their goal of creating and delivering a reliable, low-cost and sustainable energy supply.

Co-located with Gastech Exhibition and Conference in Barcelona, which for over 45 years has been at the forefront of the international gas & LNG market, GPEX aims to bring together the gas, power and energy prosumer communities, who form the central core of the energy transition.

Why Spain?

Spain has historically played a key role in its commitment to renewable and low-carbon energy, and in doing so, establishing a varied and balanced energy mix. Investment in the energy sector has returned, and regional initiatives are in place to reduce carbon emissions dramatically.

GPEX is held in partnership with the Government of Catalonia, who view the energy transition as a key pillar to the economic prosperity of the region. Ms. Assumpta Farran, Director of Catalan Institute of Energy (ICAEN), and Chair of the GPEX Advisory Board, comments:

We are excited to host next year’s GPEX18. It is an historic moment to facilitate switching to a new clean and distributed energy model, taking advantage of the confluence of the application of the internet of things and accelerated through other disruptive technologies, such as electrical vehicles, smart and improved electrical energy storage, blockchain, as well as by the dramatic fall of photovoltaic energy prices. The Agreement for the Energy Transition in Catalonia has already been approved by Catalan Government, to empower citizens to become not only consumers, but also producers. GPEX18 is a great opportunity for ‘Learning by Challenge’, to share experiences, projects and policies with international experts on how to drive and enhance this process.

Source: dmg::events

0 0

India can raise its renewable energy use to meet a quarter of the country’s total final energy demand by 2030, according to the findings of a report presented by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). Renewable energy prospects for India, a study from IRENA’s REmap programme, outlines action areas that can unlock India’s vast renewable energy potential, ensure clean and sustainable energy for generations to come, and enable the country to fulfill its pledges under the Paris Climate Agreement.

Renewable energy prospects for India describes how solar energy will play a vital role representing the second largest source of renewable energy use with 16%, followed by wind at 14%, and hydropower at 7% of the country’s total final renewable energy use by 2030. Biofuels — which can be used across the end demand spectrum, such as for transport, electricity generation and heating — would account for 62%. The country could potentially increase its share of renewable power generation to over one-third by 2030.

 

With one of the world’s largest and most ambitious renewable energy programmes, India is taking a leading role in the energy transformation both regionally and globally,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “India possesses a wealth of renewable resources, particularly for solar and bioenergy development, which can help meet growing energy demand, power economic growth and improve energy access, as well as boost overall energy security.

Increasing renewable energy deployment could save the economy twelve times more than its costs by the year 2030, creating jobs, reducing carbon dioxide emissions, and ensuring cleaner air and water, with savings on health-related costs. Furthermore, the renewable energy technologies identified in the report would lower the demand for coal and oil products between 17% and 23% by 2030, compared to a business as usual scenario.

Meeting India’s electricity demand, which has grown by 10% a year over the past decade, and attaining the country’s economic growth targets will require significant investments in power-generation capacity and related infrastructure, and in transport, buildings and industry sectors, creating important opportunities for renewable energy deployment. IRENA’s report shows that investments in renewable energy capacity must more than double to make the most of India’s potential. Mobilising affordable financing and adapting new business models will be essential to achieve this. India will also need to accelerate the transformation of its power system to integrate higher shares of renewables by strengthening transmission grids, reducing grid losses, and in general improving the resilience of the power system by investing in more flexible system that values demand-response, interconnectors and storage, as well as greater transport and power-sector synergies.

India’s population and economic growth, combined with accelerating urbanisation, is expected to increase the number of people living in cities and towns from approximately 435 million in 2015 to 600 million by 2030. In addition, estimates suggest that 80 million households — roughly 300 million people — have limited or no access to electricity. Renewables can improve energy access for poor communities and bolster energy security through diversified, and largely indigenous, sources of supply.

Renewable energy prospects: India REmap analysis is part of IRENA’s renewable energy roadmap programme, REmap, which determines the potential for countries, regions and the world to scale up renewables to ensure an affordable and sustainable energy future. The roadmap focuses on renewable power technologies and technology options in heating, cooling and transport. The India study is the latest in the series of country-level REmap analyses, which includes countries such as China, Germany, Dominican Republic, Indonesia, Mexico, Russia and the United States.

Source: IRENA

COMEVAL
ELT
COFAST-PASCH
AERZEN
IMASA