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Global clean energy investment, 2004 to 1H 2019, $ billion

The first half of 2019 saw a 39% slowdown in renewable energy investment in the world’s biggest market, China, to $28.800 M$, the lowest figure for any half-year period since 2013, according to the latest figures from BloombergNEF (BNEF).

 

The other highlight of global clean energy investment in 1H 2019 was the financing of multibillion-dollar projects in two relatively new markets – a solar thermal and photovoltaic complex in Dubai, at 950MW and 4.200 M$, and two offshore wind arrays in the sea off Taiwan, at 640MW and 900MW and an estimated combined cost of 5.700 M$.

The Dubai deal in late March, for the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum IV project, is the biggest financing ever seen in the solar sector. It involves 2.600 M$ of debt from 10 Chinese, Gulf and Western banks, plus 1.600 M$ of equity from Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, Saudi-based developer ACWA Power and equity partner Silk Road Fund of China.

The two Taiwanese offshore wind projects, Wpd Yunlin Yunneng and Ørsted Greater Changhua, involve European developers, investors and banks, as well as local players. Offshore wind activity is broadening its geographical focus, from Europe’s North Sea and China’s coastline, toward new markets such as Taiwan, the U.S. East Coast, India and Vietnam.

BNEF’s figures for clean energy investment in the first half of 2019 show mixed fortunes for the world’s major markets. The “big three” of China, the U.S. and Europe all showed falls, but with the U.S. down a modest 6% at 23.600 M$ and Europe down 4% at 22.200 M$ compared to 1H 2018, far less than China’s 39% setback.

Breaking global clean energy investment down by type of transaction, asset finance of utility-scale generation projects such as wind farms and solar parks was down 24% at 85.6 M$, due in large part to the China factor. Financing of small-scale solar systems of less than 1MW was up 32% at 23.7 M$ in the first half of this year.

Investment in specialist clean energy companies via public markets was 37% higher at 5.600 M$, helped by two big equity raisings for electric vehicle makers – an $863 M$ secondary issue for Tesla, and a 650 M$ convertible issue for China-based NIO.

Venture capital and private equity funding of clean energy companies in 1H 2019 was down 2% at 4.700 M$. There were three exceptionally large deals, however: $1 billion each for Swedish battery company Northvolt and U.S. electric vehicle battery charging specialist Lucid Motors, and 700 M$ for another U.S. EV player, Rivian Automotive.

Source: BNEF

The International Energy Agency’s latest and most comprehensive assessment of clean energy transition finds that the vast majority of technologies and sectors are failing to keep pace with long-term goals. Of the 45 energy technologies and sectors assessed in the IEA’s latest Tracking Clean Energy Progress (TCEP), only 7 are on track with the IEA’s Sustainable Development Scenario (SDS). The SDS represents a pathway to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement on climate change, deliver universal energy access and significantly reduce air pollution.

These latest findings follow an IEA assessment published in March showing that energy-related CO2 emissions worldwide rose by 1.7% in 2018 to a historic high of 33 billion tonnes.

Some clean energy technologies showed major progress last year, according to the new TCEP analysis. Energy storage is now “on track” as new installations doubled, led by Korea, China, the United States and Germany. Electric vehicles had another record year, with global sales hitting 2 million in 2018. China accounted for more than half of total sales.

Solar PV remains on track with a 31% increase in generation – representing the largest absolute growth in generation among renewable sources. But annual capacity additions of solar PV and renewable power as a whole levelled off in 2018, raising concerns about meeting long-term climate goals.

This year’s analysis expands coverage to include flaring and methane emissions from oil and gas operations, which are responsible for around 7% of the energy sector’s greenhouse gas emissions worldwide. Despite some positive developments over the past year, current technology deployment rates, policy ambition and industry efforts are still falling well short.

The buildings sector also remains off track, with emissions rising again in 2018 to an all-time high. This was the result of several factors, including extreme weather that raised energy demand for heating and cooling. Another concerning development was the slowdown in fuel economy improvements around the world as car buyers continued to purchase bigger vehicles.

Given the urgency and scale of actions needed for clean energy transitions around the world, this year’s TCEP features much greater emphasis on recommended actions for governments, industry and other key actors in the global energy system. The analysis also includes in-depth analysis on how to address more than 100 key innovation gaps across all sectors and technologies.

TCEP provides a comprehensive, rigorous and up-to-date expert analysis of clean energy transitions across a full range of technologies and sectors. It draws on the IEA’s unique understanding of markets, modelling and energy statistics to track and assess progress on technology deployment and performance, investment, policy, and innovation. It also draws on the IEA’s extensive global technology network, totalling 6,000 researchers across nearly 40 Technology Collaboration Programmes.

TCEP is part of the IEA’s broader efforts on tracking energy transitions and key indicators to help inform decision makers on where to focus innovation, investment and policy attention to achieve climate and sustainable development goals.

Source: IEA

Global energy investment stabilised in 2018, ending three consecutive years of decline, as capital spending on oil, gas and coal supply bounced back while investment stalled for energy efficiency and renewables, according to the International Energy Agency’s latest annual review.

The findings of the World Energy Investment 2019 report signal a growing mismatch between current trends and the paths to meeting the Paris Agreement and other sustainable development goals.

Global energy investment totalled more than USD 1.8 trillion in 2018, a level similar to 2017. For the third year in a row, the power sector attracted more investment than the oil and gas industry. The biggest jump in overall energy investment was in the United States, where it was boosted by higher spending in upstream supply, particularly shale, but also electricity networks. The increase narrowed the gap between the United States and China, which remained the world’s largest investment destination.

Still, even as investments stabilized, approvals for new conventional oil and gas projects fell short of what would be needed to meet continued robust growth in global energy demand. At the same time, there are few signs of the substantial reallocation of capital towards energy efficiency and cleaner supply sources that is needed to bring investments in line with the Paris Agreement and other sustainable development goals.

Renewables investment edged down, as net additions to capacity were flat and costs fell in some technologies, but was also supported by plants under development. Lower solar PV investment in China was partly offset by higher renewable spend in some areas (e.g. United States, developing Asia).

Energy efficiency spending was stable a second year in a row, with limited progress in expanding policy coverage. Despite soaring EV sales, transport efficiency has stagnated, while spending in buildings dipped.

Investment in renewable heat and transport edged down, but spending on new biofuels plants grew.

grafica

The world is witnessing a shift in investments towards energy supply projects that have shorter lead times. In power generation and the upstream oil and gas sector, the industry is bringing capacity to market more than 20% faster than at the beginning of the decade. This reflects industry and investors seeking to better manage risks in a changing energy system, and also improved project management and lower costs for shorter-cycle assets such as solar PV, onshore wind and US shale.

Even though decisions to invest in coal-fired power plants declined to their lowest level this century and retirements rose, the global coal power fleet continued to expand, particularly in developing Asian countries.

The continuing investments in coal plants, which have a long lifecycle, appear to be aimed at filling a growing gap between soaring demand for power and a levelling off of expected generation from low-carbon investments (renewables and nuclear). Without carbon capture technology or incentives for earlier retirements, coal power and the high CO2 emissions it produces would remain part of the global energy system for many years to come. At the same time, to meet sustainability goals, investment in energy efficiency would need to accelerate while spending on renewable power doubles by 2030.

Among major countries and regions, India had the second largest jump in energy investment in 2018 after the United States. However, the poorest regions of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, face persistent financing risks. They only received around 15% of investment in 2018 even though they account for 40% of the global population. Far more capital needs to flow to the least developed countries in order to meet sustainable development goals.

The report also found that public spending on energy research, development and demonstration (RD&D) is far short of what is needed. While public energy RD&D spending rose modestly in 2018, led by the United States and China, its share of gross domestic product remained flat and most countries are not spending more of their economic output on energy research.

Source: IEA

The European Investment Bank (EIB) and Santander España are providing businesses and the self-employed with a credit line – including EUR 50m of EIB funds – for professional projects improving energy efficiency. This is a pioneering project for the Spanish financial system, developed by Banco Santander in partnership with the EIB and the European Commission.

The agreement is part of the financing instrument implemented by the European Commission to promote investments contributing to better energy efficiency and climate action (Private Finance for Energy Efficiency) and falls under Banco Santander’s Responsible Banking strategy and its commitment to sustainability. Companies using this credit line will be able to benefit from the EIB’s favourable financing conditions in terms of both interest rates and maturities to perform the necessary upgrades to improve their energy efficiency. It also has a technical advisory component to support and strengthen Banco Santander’s capacity to assess energy efficiency projects and estimate their energy savings.

This new credit line, which will be implemented in the form of a loan or leasing, targets modernisation projects delivering energy efficiency improvements by tailoring energy use to actual real-time needs, for example by replacing inefficient lighting with LED equivalents, installing thermal insulation in roofs and facades, replacing air conditioning systems, installing thermal solar power, automating buildings and replacing conventional windows with double glazed alternatives with a thermal break. These improvements will help to cut polluting emissions and increase the use of renewable energy by facilitating the installation of solar panels, for example.

The investments will also enable companies and the self-employed to reduce their energy bills. Energy costs represent a considerable share of a company’s operating expenses, meaning that investment in measures enabling more rational energy use generates significant savings of between 10% and 30% on the final energy bill. These funds can then be directed to other investments to improve businesses’ quality and competitiveness.

Amounts of between EUR 10 000 and EUR 5m are eligible for financing with a maturity of between three and ten years, with the option of a one or two-year grace period depending on the financing period. The energy efficiency investment project cannot exceed EUR 10m in total.

The European Commission and EIB have developed a simulator for Banco Santander enabling customers to validate their project via the bank’s website. The simulator records key information about the company, the project cost, the type of eligible investment and the current energy use. The form can be filled out in less than ten minutes, with the simulator then validating the investment and the energy savings calculations (in euros and kilowatt-hours). The final contract for the product is signed at a bank branch.

Source: EIB

A la izquierda de la imagen, el consejero delegado de Endesa, José Bogas, junto a Emma Navarro, vicepresidenta del BEI.

The European Investment Bank (EIB) has granted its first EIB Green Loan to Endesa. This financing aims to make it easier to invest in energy efficiency and renewable energy sources. Although the EIB has financed a number of projects of this kind in its long history of combating climate change, this is the first time it has described a loan in this way, thereby helping promoters such as Endesa to develop their decarbonisation strategy.

The operation signed covers EUR 335m in financing to build 15 wind farms with a capacity of 446 MW and three solar photovoltaic plants with a capacity of 339 MW.

The EIB Green Loan will finance operations that are fully in line with the requirements set out in its Climate Awareness Bonds programme, and as a result is likely to be allocated to its portfolio of loan operations financed via the issuance of these bonds.

The EIB financing will also help achieve the objectives of the Spanish National Action Plan for Renewable Energies, which states that 20% of the energy used in Spain in 2020 must come from renewable sources.

Endesa was awarded 540 MW of wind energy and 339 MW of photovoltaic energy in the auctions for new renewable electricity generation facilities that took place in Spain in May and July 2017, which will involve an investment of over EUR 800m until 2020.

Endesa’s wind farms and solar power plants will be built in various areas across six autonomous communities: Aragón, Castilla-La Mancha, Castilla-León, Extremadura, Galicia and Murcia. The project will also help to create jobs: the construction of the wind farms and photovoltaic plants is making it possible to employ 1 700 people to work on the project during the investment phase and up until implementation.

Source: EIB

The report ‘Living in a World of Data’, drawn up by Schneider Electric, reveals the sustainability trends that are changing today’s business panorama and shows how technology is helping companies respond. According to Schneider Electric, the IoT will be the key for companies to take more informed decisions as regards energy and sustainability to reduce their impact on the planet, while improving their profitability.

The infrastructures and buildings infrastructures consume up to 70% of the world’s energy. Given the need to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions, companies have started to place sustainable practices at the centre of their strategies. Digitisation, that provides energy efficiency potentials of 82% in the case of buildings and 79% in that of infrastructures, can be the key tool to facilitate sustainability.

In this regard, Schneider Electric has identified four trends in the corporate panorama that technology will help address:

Decoupling economic growth from environmental impact

Our planet’s resources and its demand continue to accelerate. For this reason, companies have to innovative so that their growth does not involve an increasing amount of expenditure in energy and resources. Technology and digitisation facilitate this sustainable optimisation of resources while reducing threats to business continuity. Innovations such as Industry 4.0 – with technologies such as the IoT or Cloud Computing – sustainable supply chains and Everything as a Service (XaaS) will be those that make this possible.

Improving sustainability reports

Companies with well-planned sustainability strategies, clear and informed initiatives based on accurate data can improve their scores on existing global indices and sustainability and environmental programmes. The IoT will be key to improving operational and energy efficiencies yet further, by providing real time data and allowing the auditable and traceable monitoring and identification of this performance.

The need to increase customer engagement

Companies have to learn how to measure, categorise and commercialise their products and services in a sustainable way. The keys are transparent corporate processes, optimised supply chains and a responsible and considered asset management. Technology is the means that make this possible, according to the report from Schneider Electric.

The 3 Ds + E

Digitisation, decentralisation, decarbonisation and electrification are changing the way business is done. The acquisition and analysis of data are crucial for information-based decision-making. As such, investing in digitisation is one of the key factors to shift from reactive business processes to proactive processes and to guarantee a positive rate of return. For example, the report from Schneider Electric shows that, by implementing digitisation projects, significant improvements in efficiency can already be observed within the first 12 months.

Technology as a sustainability and profitability facilitator

The report concludes that the deployment of IoT technologies by companies leads to a more efficient use of resources, an improved return, a more resilient business, enhanced health and safety in addition to risk mitigation.

Companies that reduce their energy consumption by 30 or 40%, can achieve a 10% reduction in their overall operating costs. Companies from every sector are already implementing these improvements, with the report particular highlighting the hotel, manufacturing and data centre sectors. For example, thanks to a new sustainable Data Centre, the Director General of Highways in Taiwan has reduced their energy use by 36%, saving one million Euros a year. In the industrial sector, the report cites machinery manufacturer Semyx, which has achieved improvements in productivity of 50 to 75% as a result of digitisation.

The Global call for start-ups will be awarding fifteen of the most innovative, sustainable energy start-ups a tailored package of added-value services and a €100,000 cash prize will be awarded to the best one.

To support our work with the European Battery Alliance (EBA), they hope to attract and support start-ups with innovative technology or business model concepts focused on electric storage. Of particular interest are electric storage innovations for application in transportation, for grid, distributed and mobile energy storage, or to deliver energy efficiency improvements and emissions reductions.

Successful applicants will receive a place on one of InnoEnergy’s business creation programmes – the Highway™ or Boostway™ – and a tailored package of support, training, services and funding. The Highway™ uses a hands-on approach to support early stage start-ups in the go-to-market phase, helping ready products for commercialisation. The Boostway™ programme supports scale-ups to grow their businesses.

Launched in 2017, the EBA seeks to create a competitive and sustainable battery cell manufacturing value chain in Europe. We are working with more than 120 stakeholders within the EBA to achieve this ambition and help develop a new market that could be worth €250 billion a year by 2025.

Elena Bou, innovation Director at InnoEnergy, says: “Acting as a trusted partner, we’re here to give businesses the lift off they need to reach commercialisation. Through our unique ecosystem we offer start-ups unparalleled access to everything they need to make a resounding business success of their innovative ideas.”

Successful applicants will gain access to a network of more than 385 partners and including specialist business angels, InnoEnergy’s European VC community and public funding bodies. Start-ups also gain board-level advice and mentorship and a front-row seat at European energy events, including The Business Booster – InnoEnergy’s annual networking event where companies across the energy value chain attend to meet start-ups and innovations under one roof.

Bo Normark, InnoEnergy’s thematic leader for energy storage adds: “Europe needs innovative electric storage solutions to support the decarbonisation of transport and heat through electrification. It is our mission to find businesses with unique and innovative concepts, products and solutions that have the potential to be part of the sustainable battery cell manufacturing value chain.”

The call for start-ups is open until 30 October 2018. The application process consists of five phases; an initial application, an internal evaluation, a five-minute video pitch and an external expert assessment. Following the external assessment 30 applicants will pitch their idea to two parallel juries, and 15 winners will be selected. At the celebration event in February one winner will be awarded a prize of €100,000.

Applicants will be evaluated against the following criteria:

Innovativeness of the business idea
Value proposition
Addressable market size
Scalability of product/service
Founding team and ownership structure
Competitive advantage
Impact potential
Ability to leverage on InnoEnergy as a partner

Dubai Airports will use Siemens Building Technologies data analytics and smart building technology to guarantee annual energy savings of almost 20 percent per year at Dubai Airports’ facilities, by implementing energy efficiency measures at Terminal 1, Terminal 2, Terminal 3 and Concourse B at Dubai International (DXB). Focusing on air and water systems, the seven-year project is expected to reduce CO2 emissions by approximately 25,000 tons, with annual electricity savings of approximately 50 gigawatt hours (GWH), and water savings of around 21 million gallons. The initiative is part of Dubai Airports’ comprehensive energy-saving strategy and program designed to limit the environmental footprint at both of its airports.

A tailor-made energy optimization solution has been designed for the project by Siemens, comprising a range of physical and digital technologies including variable frequency drives, panels, sensors, intelligent controls, energy metering and efficient water fixtures. These will be deployed to the air and water systems to optimize the air-handling units, chilled water system, fresh air plant and the secondary fresh air, supply and exhaust fan systems.

Siemens will be responsible for the project’s design, supply, installation, commissioning and maintenance, and also the measurement, verification and guarantee of energy savings for seven years. The customer is Etihad ESCO (Energy Service Company), a venture by Dubai Electricity and Water Authority launched in 2013 to promote a performance contracting market for energy service companies. Etihad ESCO aims to jumpstart the creation of viable performance contracting market for energy service companies by executing building retrofits, increasing penetration of district cooling, building capacity of local ESCOs for private sector and facilitating access to project finance.

In October 2017, Etihad ESCO signed an agreement with Dubai Airports for the retrofitting of Terminals 1, 2, 3 and Concourse B of Dubai International Airport.

Siemens is a pioneer in digitalized buildings in the Middle East, having implemented smart building technology in key landmarks including Abu Dhabi’s Sheikh Zayed Grand Mosque, Dubai’s Atlantis Hotel and 3D-printed Office of the Future, and the recently-launched Dubai Opera. In addition, Siemens Building Technologies provides tailor-made solutions for airports worldwide, for example to support the modernization of La Guardia, New York’s international airport through integrated building automation and fire safety.

Source: Siemens

The world is not on track to meet the global energy targets for 2030 set as part of the Sustainable Development Goals, but real progress is being made in certain areas – particularly expansion of access to electricity in least developed countries, and industrial energy efficiency, according to a new report from five international agencies.

Renewable energy is making impressive gains in the electricity sector, although these are not being matched in transportation and heating – which together account for 80% of global energy consumption.

While global trends are disappointing, recent national experiences around the world offer encouraging signs. There is mounting evidence that with the right approaches and policies, countries can make substantial progress in clean energy and energy access, and improve the lives of millions of people.

Tracking SDG7: The Energy Progress Report, launched at the Sustainable Energy for All Forum, is the most comprehensive look available at the world’s progress towards the global energy targets on access to electricity, clean cooking, renewable energy and energy efficiency.

The following are some of the main findings of the report. Findings are based official national-level data and measure global progress up to 2015 for renewable energy and energy efficiency, and 2016 for access to electricity and clean cooking.

Access to electricity
• One billion people – or 13% of the world’s population – still live without electricity. Sub-Saharan Africa, and Central and South Asia continue to be the areas of the world with the largest access deficits. Almost 87% of the world’s people without electricity live in rural areas.
• The number of people gaining access to power has been accelerating since 2010, but needs to ramp up further to achieve universal access to electricity by 2030. If current trends continue, an estimated 674 million people will still live without electricity in 2030.
• Some of the strongest gains were made in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania, which all increased their electricity access rate by 3% or more annually between 2010 and 2016. Over the same period, India provided electricity to 30 million people annually, more than any other country. Sub-Saharan Africa’s electrification deficit has begun to fall in absolute terms for the first time.
• Tens of millions of people now have access to electricity through solar home systems or connected to mini-grids. However, these remain concentrated in about a dozen pioneering countries where penetration of solar electricity can reach as much as 5-15% of the population.

Clean cooking
• Three billion people – or more than 40% of the world’s population – do not have access to clean cooking fuels and technologies. Household air pollution from burning biomass for cooking and heating is responsible for some 4 million deaths a year, with women and children at the greatest risk.
• Parts of Asia have seen access to clean cooking outpace growth in population. These positive outcomes were driven largely by widespread dissemination of LPG or piped natural gas. In India, Pakistan, Indonesia and Vietnam, the population with access to clean cooking technologies grew by more than 1% of their population annually.
• In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, population growth in recent years has outstripped the number of people gaining access to clean cooking technologies by a ratio of four to one.
• Clean cooking continues to lag the furthest behind of all the four energy targets, due to low consumer awareness, financing gaps, slow technological progress, and lack of infrastructure for fuel production and distribution. If the current trajectory continues, 2.3 billion people will continue to use traditional cooking methods in 2030.

Energy efficiency
• There is mounting evidence of the uncoupling of growth and energy use. Global GDP grew nearly twice as fast as primary energy supply in 2010-15. Economic growth outpaced growth in energy use in all regions, except for Western Asia, where GDP is heavily tied to energy-intensive industries, and in all income groups. However, progress continues to be slow in low income countries, where energy intensity is higher than the global average.
• Globally, energy intensity – the ratio of energy used per unit of GDP – fell at an accelerating pace of 2.8% in 2015, the fastest decline since 2010. This improved the average annual decline in energy intensity to 2.2 % for the period 2010-2015. However, performance still falls short of the 2.6% yearly decline needed to meet the SDG7 target of doubling the global rate of improvement in energy efficiency by 2030.
• Improvement in industrial energy intensity, at 2.7% per annum since 2010, was particularly encouraging, as this is the largest energy consuming sector overall. Progress in the transport sector was more modest, especially for freight transportation, and is a particular challenge for high-income countries. In low and middle-income countries, the energy intensity of the residential sector has been increasing since 2010.
• Six of the 20 countries that represent 80 percent of the world’s total primary energy supply, including Japan and the US, reduced their annual primary energy supply in 2010-15 while continuing to grow GDP – indicating a peak in energy use. Among the large energy-intensive developing economies, China and Indonesia stood out with annual improvement exceeding 3 percent.

Renewable energy
• As of 2015, the world obtained 17.5% of its total final energy consumption from renewable sources, of which 9.6% represents modern forms of renewable energy such as geothermal, hydropower, solar and wind. The remainder is traditional uses of biomass (such as fuelwood and charcoal).
• Based on current policies, the renewable share is expected to reach just 21% by 2030, with modern renewables growing to 15%, falling short of the substantial increase demanded by the SDG7 target.
• Rapidly falling costs have allowed solar and wind to compete with conventional power generation sources in multiple regions, driving the growth in the share of renewables in electricity to 22.8% in 2015. But electricity accounted for only 20% of total final energy consumption that year, highlighting the need to accelerate progress in transport and heating.
• The share of renewable energy in transport is rising quite rapidly, but from a very low base, amounting to only 2.8% in 2015. The use of renewable energy for heating purposes has barely increased in recent years and stood at 24.8% in 2015, of which one third was from modern uses.
• Since 2010, China’s progress in renewable energy alone accounted for nearly 30% of absolute growth in renewable energy consumption globally in 2015. Brazil was the only country among the top 20 largest energy consumers to substantially exceed the global average renewable share in all end uses: electricity, transport and heating. The UK’s share of renewable energy in total final energy consumption grew by 1% annually on average since 2010 – more than five times the global average.

Clean cooking
• Three billion people – or more than 40% of the world’s population – do not have access to clean cooking fuels and technologies. Household air pollution from burning biomass for cooking and heating is responsible for some 4 million deaths a year, with women and children at the greatest risk.
• Parts of Asia have seen access to clean cooking outpace growth in population. These positive outcomes were driven largely by widespread dissemination of LPG or piped natural gas. In India, Pakistan, Indonesia and Vietnam, the population with access to clean cooking technologies grew by more than 1% of their population annually.
• In Sub-Saharan Africa, however, population growth in recent years has outstripped the number of people gaining access to clean cooking technologies by a ratio of four to one.
• Clean cooking continues to lag the furthest behind of all the four energy targets, due to low consumer awareness, financing gaps, slow technological progress, and lack of infrastructure for fuel production and distribution. If the current trajectory continues, 2.3 billion people will continue to use traditional cooking methods in 2030.

Tracking SDG7: The Energy Progress Report is a joint effort of the IEA, the IRENA, United Nations Statistics Division (UNSD), the World Bank, and the World Health Organization (WHO). It is the fourth edition of this report, formerly known as the Global Tracking Framework (GTF). Funding for the report was provided by the World Bank’s Energy Sector Management Assistance Program (ESMAP).

Source: IRENA

Germany’s new coalition government has ambitious energy policies. Industry associations are anticipating concrete support plans for systematic energy management and energy data-based manufacturing.

Based on the Green Paper on Energy Efficiency, the grand coalition plans to continue to develop and implement the national plan of action for energy (NAPE) as quickly as possible. By 2050, energy consumption is to be halved. The gaps in the climate goals for 2020 will be closed by taking into consideration the three goals of security of supply, clean energy, and economic feasibility without structural interruptions and by means of clearly expanding renewables and energy efficiency.

One item is of particular interest to companies: Existing aid programs will be stabilized at the current levels and evaluated and fine-tuned to the needs of users if necessary. The grand coalition also announced an aid program for decarbonizing the industrial sector.

Peter Altmaier (CDU), the new Minister of Economic Affairs and Energy, has also identified his priorities: Expanding the power grid, protecting energy-intensive industries, implementing the climate protection plan 2050, and promoting German battery cell production are core energy areas that he is planning to position in the grand coalition.

Altmaier signaled few concessions when it comes to the climate protection plan 2050. He recalls the government’s promise to revisit the distribution of carbon dioxide reductions that burden individual sectors after Germany’s most recent election, but he is not making any concessions to the industrial sector. “Power generation is under a strain and we now need to take care of other sectors,” said Altmaier to a council of SMEs. The point is not to focus on “how many tons of CO2 need to be reduced, but how can we achieve that goal?” says Altmaier. He indicated that it would be useful for sectors that are now subject to emissions trading to focus more strongly on their CO2 burden.

The German Industry Initiative for Energy Efficiency (DENEFF) welcomes the clear political position on energy efficiency but also sees gaps in the coalition agreement: “An effective efficiency strategy needs to provide more incentives to the industrial sector,” explains Carsten Müller, Chairman of the Board at DENEFF. “Accelerated deductions for energy-efficient investments and clever efficiency requirements in return for privileges in energy transfer and taxes could reasonably complement the projected “Decarbonization in the Industrial Sector” aid program.”

The new government’s efficiency policy will be discussed at Energy 2018 on Monday at the trade show at 1:30 p.m. during the opening session of the Forum Digital Energy. The products and services that the industrial sector needs for future energy management can be found at the group pavilion Digital Energy in Hall 12 (D45). This special display area partnered by DENEFF and VEA serves as a point of contact for companies in energy-intensive sectors who are faced with rising energy costs and new requirements such as the certification standards ISO 50001 and 50003. Digital Energy addresses energy managers, factory managers, site managers, and plant and engine builders along with technical facility managers and industrial service personnel in utility companies.

Solutions showcased in Hall 12 include digital energy optimization systems, software for load and energy data management, and energy monitoring along with system solutions for energy-efficient manufacturing processes and installations.

The forum at the special display area will address the latest technological and regulatory developments and show where integrated energy management is already being applied. The German Energy Agency (dena) is an ideal sponsor of the Digital Energy Forum. DENEFF is also providing information here on subsidies for energy efficiency and innovative solutions: “Special Industry: Less + MORE – the many advantages of industrial energy management” is the name of a DENEFF presentation on Monday afternoon. The industry association is also a part of the BuildingEnergyTechnologies Forum (Halle 27): During the all-day discussion “Less + MORE – the many advantages of energy efficiency”, DENEFF has also invited funding agencies to participate on stage.

Another partner in the special display “Digital Energy – Energy Management in the Industrial Environment” is the German Association of Energy Consumers (VEA). “Rising electricity costs, legal energy requirements, and the demand for cost-efficient and environmentally-friendly manufacturing present major challenges to many companies, especially SMEs,” says Judith Aue, energy policy spokesperson for the association in explaining its engagement.

At the Digital Energy Forum (April 24 to 26, from 9:30 to 10 a.m.) the VEA advises its members during its daily opening talk at the user forum to support “a mix of energy-efficient production and strategic energy purchases, along with thinking outside the box, and of course, meeting legal energy requirements.” Experts will be on hand throughout the show to interested companies for one-on-one discussions and any questions they may have.

“Knowledge of energy legislation is not only a fundamental part of sound legal protection but also pays off financially for companies,” says Judith Aue. This is especially apparent “when in individual cases some VEA members generate their entire annual budget for new investments solely by complying with compulsory registration and making claims with the correct government authorities. Unfortunately, instructions on actual implementation is frequently lacking,” says Aue.

The VEA is therefore asking the new government to reduce the bureaucracy. In the Renewable Energy Law (EEG) and the Act on Combined Heat and Power Generation (KWKG), energy consumers want “a minimum threshold for third party amounts regarding customer generation and self-supply, along with claims for relief, and a clear definition of an electricity company.” A “standardization of registration deadlines for allocations on the network side, self-generation, self-supply, and electricity supply” are among the VEA’s requests along with “creating a standard definition of an end consumer at charging points for e-mobility” (Sec. 3 No. 25 EnWG, Sec. 3 No. 33 EEG, and Sec. 2 No. 17 KWKG), a “deadline for the use of calibrated meters in the KWKG” (Sec. 36, para. 3) and “clarification of the definition of emergency generators in terms of power generation units” (Sec. 3, No. 43b EEG).

Source: Hannover Messe

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