Tags Posts tagged with "energy storage"

energy storage

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Saft has extended its range of containerized lithium-ion (Li-ion) Energy Storage Systems (ESS) with the Intensium Max 20 High Energy (HE) that offers 2.5 MWh storage capacity in a standard 20-foot container. With the new fully integrated container, Saft can address the majority of grid, renewables, commercial and industrial applications that require large-scale ESS solutions able to sustain multiple daily cycles with typical discharge times of 2 to 4 hours.

The main applications for the Intensium Max 20 HE will be energy time-shifting for large solar photovoltaic (PV) and wind farms, as well as enabling utilities to defer grid investment through virtual power lines, and ‘behind the meter’ for large industrial and commercial premises.

In developing the Intensium Max 20 HE, Saft has focused on achieving high levels of safety, reliability and ease of maintenance in a design that is ‘best in class’ across energy density, energy efficiency, lifetime and performance with 1.2 MW power and 2.5 MWh energy storage. The container integrates all the essential control, thermal management and safety functions in a flexible, scalable architecture that provides the building block for the creation of large-scale installations up to 100 MW.

Hervé Amossé, Saft Executive Vice President Transportation, Telecom and Grid said: “Saft has generations of experience in the design, manufacture and delivery of containerized Li-ion systems that have established an outstanding track record in applications requiring high power for short durations, such as frequency support and ancillary services. We have put this wealth of experience into this fourth-generation container that enables us to address a much broader range of applications that require high energy delivered over long durations.” “We anticipate that the Intensium Max 20 HE will be a vital element in Saft’s new strategy to offer integrated turnkey ESS in which the battery forms part of a complete system that includes every element up to the grid connection.

The Intensium Max 20 HE is based around a new unmanned approach to the container design, with no need for an internal access corridor for maintenance, as the Li-ion modules and control systems can be accessed externally. Together with new larger modules and advanced cell designs, this has enabled a significant increase in energy density within the standard 20-foot container that offers ease of transportation and handling on site.

A further advantage of Saft’s containerized design is that the systems are fully fitted out and tested under factory-controlled conditions. This ensures that they arrive on site ready to ‘plug and play’ for fast, easy installation and commissioning. Saft takes responsibility for every aspect of their design and integration and provides long term warranties – an important point for customers who want to maximize reliability and availability.

Saft is able to serve customers worldwide by making the Intensium Max 20 HE available through three manufacturing hubs located in North America, Europe and the Far East, with the first shipments scheduled in September 2019 for a European wind and storage project.

Source: Saft

Siemens Finland has created a new business to expand its virtual power plant activity: Vibeco (Virtual Buildings Ecosystem) is an innovative approach to increase the benefits of increasingly decentralized energy systems. The heart of the virtual power plant is a software platform, operated by Siemens, that intelligently balances electrical loads from buildings that have been connected in a microgrid,
incorporating renewable energy and energy storage.

The new virtual power plant (VPP) service platform – a digitized demand-response system – makes it possible for the first time to combine the small electrical loads of buildings or industrial sites, so that building operators can sell energy back to the reserve market, with the ultimate goal to increase the flexibility of the electricity market as a whole.

We are shaping a new market at the grid edge with this technology,” explained Cedrik Neike, Chief Executive Officer Siemens Smart Infrastructure. “Together with the State of Finland, we are pioneering a model for decentralized energy systems to benefit utilities, business and society. The complexity of balancing loads across buildings, the grid and even with eMobility infrastructure requires deep domain expertise in the demand and supply areas.

The VPP service helps balance power consumption, to decrease the need for reserve power and, consequently, cutting carbon dioxide emissions. The Finnish national grid operator, Fingrid, compensates property owners when the VPP feeds energy into the public grid. Finland’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment is providing a grant of 8.4 million euros for the required technology investments.

Siemens already has two pilot customers for its VPP approach: Finnish Railways will connect the iconic Helsinki Central Station as well as two train depots in a microgrid to create a virtual power plant.

Renewable energy is challenging the entire energy system. We want to prepare for these changes now,” says Juha Antti Juutinen, Director of Real Estate at Finnish Railways.

Lappeenranta, a city of 75,000 inhabitants close to the Russian border, will kick off with nine public buildings, scaling up to connect 50 more buildings to a city microgrid.

The virtual power plant service decreases the environmental impact of the city and provides additional income,” says Markku Mäki-Hokkonen, development manager of the City of Lappeenranta.

Siemens’ VPP platform leverages the company’s successful energy optimization project at Sello shopping mall, a property of 100.000 m2 space located in the suburbs of Helsinki. Sello’s microgrid combines energy efficiency, storage, optimization of peak loads, and its own electricity production. In addition, supplying extra energy to the reserve market has led to annual income of around 650,000 euros annually for the Sello property owners.

Source: Siemens

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Sistema de almacenamiento en baterías de 2.3 MW para mantener la estabilidad de la red en las islas Feroe | 2.3 MW BESS to maintain the grid stability of the Faroe Islands. Foto cortesía de / Photo courtesy of: Saft

The energy storage market has caught the eye of a number of stakeholders involved in the power industry, leading to its considerable growth and opening the way for next energy revolution, says GlobalData. GlobalData’s latest thematic report, ‘Thematic Research: Energy Storage’, highlights the present scenario and emerging market trends in the global energy storage industry, and the key companies behind the development of three energy storage technologies: electrochemical, mechanical and thermal energy storage.

The energy storage market is nascent but fast-growing. The demand for energy storage system (ESS) devices in the power sector is increasing rapidly, particularly after the increase in the renewable energy integration into the grids. Intermittent power supply led to demand for the storage of electrical energy and supply during peak load periods. ESS devices can help make renewable energy -whose power output cannot be controlled by grid operators- smooth and dispatchable.

With the global energy storage market becoming one of the rapidly growing segments within the renewable power mix, equipment manufacturers or technology providers of energy storage technologies are focused on innovating their energy storage solutions and offering advanced energy storage systems.

Battery energy storage system (BESS) is regarded as a crucial solution for overcoming the intermittency limitations of renewable energy sources (RES). The battery energy storage market reported cumulative deployment of 4.9 GW at the end of 2018 and is expected to reach 22.2 GW in 2023, with the US accounting for 24.7% of the global capacity. The deployment is expected to grow, due to a large number of countries opting for storage utilization to support their power sector transformation.

The expansion in battery manufacturing capacity and falling costs resulting from the electric vehicle (EV) industry are driving growth in energy storage services and new markets. This fall in battery prices has favored the battery energy storage market and has speeded the deployment of energy storage projects globally.

Currently, lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries dominate the electrochemical energy storage market but other battery energy storage technologies such as sodium-sulfur (NaS), lead-acid and flow batteries are now getting deployed. While, thermal energy storage utilizing molten salt is among the most widely used technology in association with concentrated solar power (CSP) projects, among mechanical energy storage technologies, pumped hydroelectric storage systems is among the most mature energy storage technologies and offers a number of benefits such as energy-balancing, stability, storage capacity, along with ancillary grid services which include network frequency control and reserves.

Source: GlobalData

The global battery energy storage market is forecast to grow to US$13.13bn by 2023. According to GlobalData, the Asia Pacific (APAC) and EMEA regions will be the dominant markets for battery energy storage systems over the forecast period 2019-2023. The company’s latest report ‘Battery Energy Storage Market, Update 2019 – Global Market Size, Competitive Landscape and Key Country Analysis to 2023’ reveals that the fall in technology prices and increasing pace of development in the power market are the primary driving factors for the battery energy storage market.

APAC will continue to be the largest market reaching US$6.05bn in 2023, as countries are increasing investments for improving their grid infrastructure and improving the market structure to attract foreign investments. As regards technology, lithium-ion is and will continue to be, the preferred technology for market deployment.

The US has been the largest market for Battery Energy Storage Systems (BESS) both in terms of cumulative installed capacity and by market value for projects installed up to 2018 and is likely to continue to lead the market at country level. The US market for battery energy storage is estimated to reach US$2.96bn in 2023, accounting for 23% of the global market.

Asia Pacific was the largest BESS market in 2018, accounting for 45% of the global market installed capacity and the region is also expected to maintain its top position in the forecast period. With the number of grid-connected renewable electricity generation plants increasing tremendously, countries such as China, India, Japan, South Korea and the Philippines will focus on frequency regulation in the electric grid to normalise the variation in power generation from renewables.

The EMEA battery energy storage market registered a market value of approximately US$1.73bn in 2018, accounting for 26% of the global market. The region has a strong demand for flexibility, due to technological advancements, evolving market conditions, strong research facilities and supportive policies. The Middle East and Africa are small markets with demand for storage expected to increase once renewable power generation gains significant traction in the market.

The battery energy storage market in the Americas registered a market value of approximately US$1.97bn in 2018, accounting for 28% in 2018. This region’s market is growing, with countries such as the US, Chile, Canada and Brazil promoting battery storage installations across consumer segments. Some US states have robust incentive programs, most notably California, which adopted an ambitious target for 1.3 GW of energy storage by 2020, which it has already surpassed with a new target awaiting approval.

With countries aggressively promoting the modernisation of grids and developing their capability to handle present and future demands, batteries are being deployed to support smart grids, integrate renewables, create responsive electricity markets, provide ancillary services and enhance both system resilience and energy self-sufficiency. Given this situation, the BESS market, which is estimated at 4.9 GW in 2018, is forecast to reach 22.2 GW by 2023.

Market conditions are improving and more companies are moving towards decentralised generation, leading to an increase in the on-site deployment of renewables and batteries, as well as in micro- or mini-grids. Supportive policies and high electricity charges are also nudging the market towards renewables and/or storage plus renewables at end consumer level.

As the power sector evolves to accommodate new technologies and adapt to varying market trends, energy storage will play a central role in the transition and transformation of the power sector.

Sistema de conversión de potencia de Ingeteam para un proyecto piloto en Dubái, el primer sistema de almacenamiento de energía en EAU acoplado a una planta fotovoltaica a gran escala / Ingeteam's power conversion system (PCS) for a pilot project in Dubai, the first energy storage system paired with a PV plant at a grid-scale level in the UAE. Foto cortesía de /Photo courtesy of: Ingeteam

Amplex-Emirates LLC was awarded a pilot project by Dubai’s Electricity & Water Authority (DEWA) to install a battery energy storage system (BESS) at the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai; the first energy storage system paired with a photovoltaic plant at a grid-scale level in the United Arab Emirates. NGK Insulators LTD supplied its NAS batteries and Ingeteam was responsible for the supply of a 1.2 MW power conversion system (PCS) with its medium voltage components (power transformer, MV switchgear, etc.), and the power plant controller (PPC).

Dubai has accelerated investment in renewable energy to eliminate dependence on fossil fuels and for sustainable economic growth, and is building the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the world’s largest solar park, in the south of the Emirate. Dubai is targeting introduction of 5,000 MW of solar  PV and CSP by 2030, which will raise the ratio of renewable energy to 25% of total generation capacity. Furthermore, Dubai is seeking a 75% power output from clean energy sources by 2050.

In anticipation of the large-scale introduction of renewable energy in the future, DEWA installed a NAS battery system in the solar park to demonstrate its effectiveness in stabilizing grid fluctuations caused by the nature of renewable energy. The 1.2 MW/7.2 MWh NAS storage system is allowing DEWA for evaluating the technical and economic capabilities of this technology when integrated with PV arrays in order to increase grid stability and reduce CO2 emissions. In fact, the storage system will be also used for energy time shifting, frequency control and voltage control by using the large capacity of the batteries. This kind of hybrid systems help to deliver clean and reliable power to energy consumers with a greater availability and cost-effectiveness.

The Ingeteam supply was comprised of a 1.2 MVA power station equipped with two storage inverters and all the rest of components for a LV-to-MV and DC-to-AC conversion (medium voltage transformer, medium voltage switchgear, etc.). These inverters have been conceived to perform according to the most demanding international grid codes, featuring some very advanced operating functions such as black start capability. Moreover, they are suitable for both stand-alone and grid-tied systems. Also, Ingeteam supplied the Power Plant Controller (PPC) and the BMS interface control that manages the operation of the overall system, developing the more advanced control features, such as:

  • Energy Time Shifting. This control mode enables an advanced power generation planning, making the power plant’s production profile unmatch the consumption profile, allowing electric utilities to address daily peak demand that falls outside periods of solar generation.
  • Predictable PV+BESS production: The BESS is connected in the boundary of the PV plant and receives the real-time PV production. The power station automatically changes the active power according to the PV production variations to ensure a PV+BESS predictable power production in the common point of connection at the Syhaslm- 33/11kV substation.
  • Fast Frequency Regulation. The system adjusts the power production depending on the frequency variations.
  • Voltage Droop Control. According to an established droop gain, the system selects the necessary reactive power at the point of connection, depending on the existing voltage difference.

Source: Ingeteam

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    PV

    Growatt is one of the world’s top PV inverter brands. Established in 2010, Growatt started with a vision to lead in the PV inverter sector and contribute to clean energy. Growatt provides a broad range of solar energy solutions, including solar inverters from 750 W to 2.52 MW, energy storage solutions for on-grid and off-grid applications, smart energy solutions etc. Driven by the expertise of over 200 professional R&D engineers and continuous investment, Growatt has grown into a global leader with presence in over 100 countries. By 2017 Growatt has become one of the global TOP 10 PV inverter brands according to IHS Markit.

    www.ginverter.com

    Foto cortesía de / Image courtesy of: ContourGlobal.

    Wärtsilä has been awarded an integrated 6 MW energy storage project contract for the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) hybrid energy project includes both the hardware, consisting of batteries and inverters, as well as GEMS, the energy management software from Greensmith Energy, a Wärtsilä company. The order with ContourGlobal Bonaire, a subsidiary of London based ContourGlobal, was booked in Q4, 2018.

    The energy storage system will enable Bonaire, part of the Netherlands Antilles, to increase its use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In order to integrate more renewable energy and its intermittent nature, the Wärtsilä energy storage solution will provide the grid stability and reliability required for the island. The energy storage solution will also prevent situations where generation from renewable sources would otherwise had to be curtailed.

    The project will integrate multiple generation assets including all of the island’s existing power generation assets, energy storage, wind and solar. GEMS software will control the island grid of Bonaire, an island of 19,000 inhabitants. Work on the Wärtsilä EPC project has commenced, and final completion is expected in April 2019.

    Greensmith’s GEMS software platform offers the widest range of energy storage applications for optimising energy storage, often integrated with a growing variety of renewable and thermal generation assets.

    Source: Wärtsilä

    Global clean energy investment, investment in renewable energy excluding large hydro-electric projects, but including equity-raising by companies in smart grid, digital energy, energy storage and electric vehicles, totaled $332.1 billion in 2018, down 8% on 2017. Last year was the fifth in a row in which investment exceeded the $300 billion mark, according to authoritative figures from BloombergNEF (BNEF).

    There were sharp contrasts between clean energy sectors in terms of the change in dollar investment last year. Wind investment rose 3% to $128.6 billion, with offshore wind having its second-highest year. Money committed to smart meter rollouts and electric vehicle company financings also increased.

    However, the most striking shifts were in solar. Overall investment in that sector dropped 24% in dollar terms to $130.8 billion, even though there was record new photovoltaic capacity added, breaking 100 GW barrier for the first time. Part of this reduction was due to sharply declining capital costs. BNEF’s global benchmark for the cost of installing a megawatt of photovoltaic capacity fell 12% in 2018 as manufacturers slashed selling prices in the face of a glut of PV modules on the world market.

    That surplus was aggravated by a sharp change in policy in China in mid-year. The government acted to cool that country’s solar boom by restricting access for new projects to its feed-in tariff. The result of this, combined with lower unit costs, was that Chinese solar investment plunged 53% to $40.4 billion in 2018.

    The biggest solar projects financed included the 800 MW NOORm Midelt PV and solar thermal portfolio in Morocco, at an estimated $2.4 billion, and the 709 MW NLC Tangedco PV plant in India, at a cost of about $500 million. India is one of the countries with the lowest capital costs per megawatt for photovoltaic plants.

    Offshore wind was a major recipient of clean energy investment last year, attracting $25.7 billion, up 14% on the previous year. The balance of activity in offshore is tilting. Countries such as the U.K. and Germany pioneered this industry and will remain important, but China is taking over as the biggest market and new locations such as Taiwan and the U.S. East Coast are seeing strong interest from developers. Some of the projects financed were in Europe, led by the 950 MW Moray Firth East array in the North Sea, at an estimated $3.3 billion, but there were also 13 Chinese offshore wind farms starting construction, for a total of some $11.4 billion.

    Onshore wind saw $100.8 billion of new asset finance globally last year, up 2%, with the biggest projects reaching go-ahead including the 706 MW Enel Green Power South Africa portfolio, at an estimated $1.4 billion, and the Xcel Rush Creek installation in the U.S., at $1 billion for 600 MW.

    Among other renewable energy sectors, investment in biomass and waste-to-energy rose 18% to $6.3 billion, while that in biofuels rallied 47% to $3 billion. Geothermal was up 10% at $1.8 billion, small hydro down 50% at $1.7 billion and marine up 16% at $180 million. Total investment in utility-scale renewable energy projects and small-scale solar systems worldwide was down 13% year-on-year at $256.5 billion, although the gigawatt capacity added increased.

    Other categories of investment showed mixed trends in 2018. Corporate research and development spending slipped 6% to $20.9 billion, while government R&D rose 4% to $15 billion. There was a 20% increase in public markets investment in specialist clean energy companies, to $10.5 billion, with the biggest initial public offerings including $1.2 billion for Chinese electric vehicle company NIO, $852 million for Chinese electric car battery maker Contemporary Amperex Technology, and $808 million for French solar developer Neoen.

    Global venture capital and private equity investment jumped 127% to $9.2 billion, the highest since 2010. The biggest deals were $1.1 billion of expansion capital for U.S. smart window maker View, and $795 million for Chinese electric vehicle firm Youxia Motors. In fact, there were no fewer than eight VC/PE financings of Chinese EV specialist companies in 2018, totaling some $3.3 billion.

    Looking at the 2018 clean energy investment numbers by country, China was again the clear leader, but its total of $100.1 billion was down 32% on 2017’s record figure because of the plunge in the value of solar commitments. Once again, the actions of China are playing a major role in the dynamics of the energy transition, helping to drive down solar costs, grow the offshore wind and EV markets and lift venture capital and private equity investment.”

    The U.S. was the second-biggest investing country, at $64.2 billion, up 12%. Developers have been rushing to finance wind and solar projects in order to take advantage of tax credit incentives, before these expire early next decade. There has also been a boom, in both the U.S. and Europe, in the construction of projects benefitting from power purchase agreements signed by big corporations such as Facebook and Google.

    Europe saw clean energy investment leap 27% to $74.5 billion, helped by the financing of five offshore wind projects in the billion-dollar-plus category. There was also a sharp recovery in the Spanish solar market, helped by heavily reduced costs, and a continuation of the build-out of large wind farms in Sweden and Norway offering low-cost electricity to industrial consumers.

    Other countries and territories investing in excess of $2 billion in clean energy in 2018 were:

    • Japan at $27.2 billion, down 16%
    • India at $11.1 billion, down 21%
    • Germany at $10.5 billion, down 32%
    • The U.K. at $10.4 billion, up 1%
    • Australia at $9.5 billion, up 6%
    • Spain at $7.8 billion, up sevenfold
    • Netherlands at $5.6 billion, up 60%
    • Sweden at $5.5 billion, up 37%
    • France at $5.3 billion, up 7%
    • South Korea at $5 billion, up 74%
    • South Africa at $4.2 billion, up 40-fold
    • Mexico at $3.8 billion, down 38%
    • Vietnam at $3.3 billion, up 18-fold
    • Denmark at $3.2 billion, up fivefold
    • Belgium at $2.9 billion, up fourfold
    • Italy at $2.8 billion, up 11%
    • Morocco at $2.8 billion, up 13-fold
    • Taiwan at $2.4 billion, up 134%
    • Ukraine at $2.4 billion, up 15-fold
    • Canada at $2.2 billion, down 34%
    • Turkey at $2.2 billion, down 5%
    • Norway at $2 billion, no change

    Source: BloombergNEF

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    FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

    At energy level we are at a turning point. The commitment to conserving resources and the need to reduce CO2 emissions is – or should be – widespread. Technologies such as microgrids are extremely useful in this regard, as they can maximise the use of renewable resources and energy storage. Recently, Schneider Electric and Lidl Finland have collaborated to create Finland’s largest industrial microgrid, an excellent example of how these technologies are generating value, while improving energy quality, even in the harshest of climates…Por Enric Vinyes, Head of Energy Automation, Schneider Electric Iberia.

    FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

    Remote off-grid communities across northern Canada and Alaska are traditionally powered by diesel generators. Fuel delivery, often via ice roads, can be difficult and expensive. Wind turbines and solar PV arrays can be deployed to offset the need for diesel generation, but they can destabilise the system at anything more than modest penetration levels. Using energy storage can help renewables achieve much higher levels of penetration to maximise fuel savings. This article describes the control strategies for such systems and the challenges of Arctic installations… By Jim McDowall, ESS Business Development Manager, Saft Batteries.

    COMEVAL