Tags Posts tagged with "energy storage"

energy storage

Amplex-Emirates LLC was awarded a pilot project by Dubai’s Electricity & Water Authority (DEWA) to install a battery energy storage system (BESS) at the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park in Dubai; the first energy storage system paired with a photovoltaic plant at a grid-scale level in the United Arab Emirates. NGK Insulators LTD supplied its NAS batteries and Ingeteam was responsible for the supply of a 1.2 MW power conversion system (PCS) with its medium voltage components (power transformer, MV switchgear, etc.), and the power plant controller (PPC).

Dubai has accelerated investment in renewable energy to eliminate dependence on fossil fuels and for sustainable economic growth, and is building the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Solar Park, the world’s largest solar park, in the south of the Emirate. Dubai is targeting introduction of 5,000 MW of solar  PV and CSP by 2030, which will raise the ratio of renewable energy to 25% of total generation capacity. Furthermore, Dubai is seeking a 75% power output from clean energy sources by 2050.

In anticipation of the large-scale introduction of renewable energy in the future, DEWA installed a NAS battery system in the solar park to demonstrate its effectiveness in stabilizing grid fluctuations caused by the nature of renewable energy. The 1.2 MW/7.2 MWh NAS storage system is allowing DEWA for evaluating the technical and economic capabilities of this technology when integrated with PV arrays in order to increase grid stability and reduce CO2 emissions. In fact, the storage system will be also used for energy time shifting, frequency control and voltage control by using the large capacity of the batteries. This kind of hybrid systems help to deliver clean and reliable power to energy consumers with a greater availability and cost-effectiveness.

The Ingeteam supply was comprised of a 1.2 MVA power station equipped with two storage inverters and all the rest of components for a LV-to-MV and DC-to-AC conversion (medium voltage transformer, medium voltage switchgear, etc.). These inverters have been conceived to perform according to the most demanding international grid codes, featuring some very advanced operating functions such as black start capability. Moreover, they are suitable for both stand-alone and grid-tied systems. Also, Ingeteam supplied the Power Plant Controller (PPC) and the BMS interface control that manages the operation of the overall system, developing the more advanced control features, such as:

  • Energy Time Shifting. This control mode enables an advanced power generation planning, making the power plant’s production profile unmatch the consumption profile, allowing electric utilities to address daily peak demand that falls outside periods of solar generation.
  • Predictable PV+BESS production: The BESS is connected in the boundary of the PV plant and receives the real-time PV production. The power station automatically changes the active power according to the PV production variations to ensure a PV+BESS predictable power production in the common point of connection at the Syhaslm- 33/11kV substation.
  • Fast Frequency Regulation. The system adjusts the power production depending on the frequency variations.
  • Voltage Droop Control. According to an established droop gain, the system selects the necessary reactive power at the point of connection, depending on the existing voltage difference.

Source: Ingeteam

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    PV

    Growatt is one of the world’s top PV inverter brands. Established in 2010, Growatt started with a vision to lead in the PV inverter sector and contribute to clean energy. Growatt provides a broad range of solar energy solutions, including solar inverters from 750 W to 2.52 MW, energy storage solutions for on-grid and off-grid applications, smart energy solutions etc. Driven by the expertise of over 200 professional R&D engineers and continuous investment, Growatt has grown into a global leader with presence in over 100 countries. By 2017 Growatt has become one of the global TOP 10 PV inverter brands according to IHS Markit.

    www.ginverter.com

    Foto cortesía de / Image courtesy of: ContourGlobal.

    Wärtsilä has been awarded an integrated 6 MW energy storage project contract for the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) hybrid energy project includes both the hardware, consisting of batteries and inverters, as well as GEMS, the energy management software from Greensmith Energy, a Wärtsilä company. The order with ContourGlobal Bonaire, a subsidiary of London based ContourGlobal, was booked in Q4, 2018.

    The energy storage system will enable Bonaire, part of the Netherlands Antilles, to increase its use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In order to integrate more renewable energy and its intermittent nature, the Wärtsilä energy storage solution will provide the grid stability and reliability required for the island. The energy storage solution will also prevent situations where generation from renewable sources would otherwise had to be curtailed.

    The project will integrate multiple generation assets including all of the island’s existing power generation assets, energy storage, wind and solar. GEMS software will control the island grid of Bonaire, an island of 19,000 inhabitants. Work on the Wärtsilä EPC project has commenced, and final completion is expected in April 2019.

    Greensmith’s GEMS software platform offers the widest range of energy storage applications for optimising energy storage, often integrated with a growing variety of renewable and thermal generation assets.

    Source: Wärtsilä

    Global clean energy investment, investment in renewable energy excluding large hydro-electric projects, but including equity-raising by companies in smart grid, digital energy, energy storage and electric vehicles, totaled $332.1 billion in 2018, down 8% on 2017. Last year was the fifth in a row in which investment exceeded the $300 billion mark, according to authoritative figures from BloombergNEF (BNEF).

    There were sharp contrasts between clean energy sectors in terms of the change in dollar investment last year. Wind investment rose 3% to $128.6 billion, with offshore wind having its second-highest year. Money committed to smart meter rollouts and electric vehicle company financings also increased.

    However, the most striking shifts were in solar. Overall investment in that sector dropped 24% in dollar terms to $130.8 billion, even though there was record new photovoltaic capacity added, breaking 100 GW barrier for the first time. Part of this reduction was due to sharply declining capital costs. BNEF’s global benchmark for the cost of installing a megawatt of photovoltaic capacity fell 12% in 2018 as manufacturers slashed selling prices in the face of a glut of PV modules on the world market.

    That surplus was aggravated by a sharp change in policy in China in mid-year. The government acted to cool that country’s solar boom by restricting access for new projects to its feed-in tariff. The result of this, combined with lower unit costs, was that Chinese solar investment plunged 53% to $40.4 billion in 2018.

    The biggest solar projects financed included the 800 MW NOORm Midelt PV and solar thermal portfolio in Morocco, at an estimated $2.4 billion, and the 709 MW NLC Tangedco PV plant in India, at a cost of about $500 million. India is one of the countries with the lowest capital costs per megawatt for photovoltaic plants.

    Offshore wind was a major recipient of clean energy investment last year, attracting $25.7 billion, up 14% on the previous year. The balance of activity in offshore is tilting. Countries such as the U.K. and Germany pioneered this industry and will remain important, but China is taking over as the biggest market and new locations such as Taiwan and the U.S. East Coast are seeing strong interest from developers. Some of the projects financed were in Europe, led by the 950 MW Moray Firth East array in the North Sea, at an estimated $3.3 billion, but there were also 13 Chinese offshore wind farms starting construction, for a total of some $11.4 billion.

    Onshore wind saw $100.8 billion of new asset finance globally last year, up 2%, with the biggest projects reaching go-ahead including the 706 MW Enel Green Power South Africa portfolio, at an estimated $1.4 billion, and the Xcel Rush Creek installation in the U.S., at $1 billion for 600 MW.

    Among other renewable energy sectors, investment in biomass and waste-to-energy rose 18% to $6.3 billion, while that in biofuels rallied 47% to $3 billion. Geothermal was up 10% at $1.8 billion, small hydro down 50% at $1.7 billion and marine up 16% at $180 million. Total investment in utility-scale renewable energy projects and small-scale solar systems worldwide was down 13% year-on-year at $256.5 billion, although the gigawatt capacity added increased.

    Other categories of investment showed mixed trends in 2018. Corporate research and development spending slipped 6% to $20.9 billion, while government R&D rose 4% to $15 billion. There was a 20% increase in public markets investment in specialist clean energy companies, to $10.5 billion, with the biggest initial public offerings including $1.2 billion for Chinese electric vehicle company NIO, $852 million for Chinese electric car battery maker Contemporary Amperex Technology, and $808 million for French solar developer Neoen.

    Global venture capital and private equity investment jumped 127% to $9.2 billion, the highest since 2010. The biggest deals were $1.1 billion of expansion capital for U.S. smart window maker View, and $795 million for Chinese electric vehicle firm Youxia Motors. In fact, there were no fewer than eight VC/PE financings of Chinese EV specialist companies in 2018, totaling some $3.3 billion.

    Looking at the 2018 clean energy investment numbers by country, China was again the clear leader, but its total of $100.1 billion was down 32% on 2017’s record figure because of the plunge in the value of solar commitments. Once again, the actions of China are playing a major role in the dynamics of the energy transition, helping to drive down solar costs, grow the offshore wind and EV markets and lift venture capital and private equity investment.”

    The U.S. was the second-biggest investing country, at $64.2 billion, up 12%. Developers have been rushing to finance wind and solar projects in order to take advantage of tax credit incentives, before these expire early next decade. There has also been a boom, in both the U.S. and Europe, in the construction of projects benefitting from power purchase agreements signed by big corporations such as Facebook and Google.

    Europe saw clean energy investment leap 27% to $74.5 billion, helped by the financing of five offshore wind projects in the billion-dollar-plus category. There was also a sharp recovery in the Spanish solar market, helped by heavily reduced costs, and a continuation of the build-out of large wind farms in Sweden and Norway offering low-cost electricity to industrial consumers.

    Other countries and territories investing in excess of $2 billion in clean energy in 2018 were:

    • Japan at $27.2 billion, down 16%
    • India at $11.1 billion, down 21%
    • Germany at $10.5 billion, down 32%
    • The U.K. at $10.4 billion, up 1%
    • Australia at $9.5 billion, up 6%
    • Spain at $7.8 billion, up sevenfold
    • Netherlands at $5.6 billion, up 60%
    • Sweden at $5.5 billion, up 37%
    • France at $5.3 billion, up 7%
    • South Korea at $5 billion, up 74%
    • South Africa at $4.2 billion, up 40-fold
    • Mexico at $3.8 billion, down 38%
    • Vietnam at $3.3 billion, up 18-fold
    • Denmark at $3.2 billion, up fivefold
    • Belgium at $2.9 billion, up fourfold
    • Italy at $2.8 billion, up 11%
    • Morocco at $2.8 billion, up 13-fold
    • Taiwan at $2.4 billion, up 134%
    • Ukraine at $2.4 billion, up 15-fold
    • Canada at $2.2 billion, down 34%
    • Turkey at $2.2 billion, down 5%
    • Norway at $2 billion, no change

    Source: BloombergNEF

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    FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

    At energy level we are at a turning point. The commitment to conserving resources and the need to reduce CO2 emissions is – or should be – widespread. Technologies such as microgrids are extremely useful in this regard, as they can maximise the use of renewable resources and energy storage. Recently, Schneider Electric and Lidl Finland have collaborated to create Finland’s largest industrial microgrid, an excellent example of how these technologies are generating value, while improving energy quality, even in the harshest of climates…Por Enric Vinyes, Head of Energy Automation, Schneider Electric Iberia.

    FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

    Remote off-grid communities across northern Canada and Alaska are traditionally powered by diesel generators. Fuel delivery, often via ice roads, can be difficult and expensive. Wind turbines and solar PV arrays can be deployed to offset the need for diesel generation, but they can destabilise the system at anything more than modest penetration levels. Using energy storage can help renewables achieve much higher levels of penetration to maximise fuel savings. This article describes the control strategies for such systems and the challenges of Arctic installations… By Jim McDowall, ESS Business Development Manager, Saft Batteries.

    CMBlu Projekt AG and Schaeffler Technologies AG & Co. KG have announced the signature of a joint development agreement (JDA) to cooperate in the production of large-scale energy storage systems. Over the past five years, CMBlu – in collaboration with research groups from German universities – has developed the novel and renewable Organic Flow Storage Technology for power grids up to prototype scale. On this basis, Schaeffler and CMBlu will jointly develop and industrialize commercial products to be marketed by CMBlu. The goal of both partners is to make a substantial contribution to a secure, efficient and sustainable power supply worldwide.

    Organic Flow Batteries can be used flexibly as stationary energy storage units in the power grid and contribute to the balance between generation and consumption. The technology has diverse applications, for example in the intermediate storage of renewable energies or peak shaving in industrial plants. Another field of application is the charging infrastructure for electromobility. As buffer storage, the batteries contribute to the relief of medium-voltage grids, eliminating the need for upgrading due to additional loads. Ultimately, a decentralized charging infrastructure for electric vehicles will only be possible with powerful and scalable energy storage systems, such as Organic Flow Batteries.

    The underlying technology is similar to the principle of conventional redox flow batteries. The electrical energy is stored in chemical compounds, which form electrolytes in water solution. In contrast to conventional, metal-based systems, organic molecules derived from lignin are used for storage. Lignin can be found in every plant such as trees or grasses. It is a naturally renewable source and is extracted in pulp and paper production as a waste product on a million-ton scale. This ensures lignin as a permanently available raw material for large-scale energy storage system.

    All electrotechnical components in the energy converter have been adapted to these electrolytes and improved for cost-effective mass production. The entire value chain of the batteries can be realized locally. There are no import dependencies on individual countries. In addition, Organic Flow Battery Systems do not use rare earths or heavy metals, are non-flammable and therefore can be operated very safely. Due to their operating principle, the capacity of Organic Flow Systems can be scaled up independently of the electrical power and is limited only by the size of the storage tanks and the amount of electrolyte.

    For industrialization, CMBlu has entered into a long-term cooperation agreement with Schaeffler for the development of large-scale energy storage systems with the aim of providing market-ready products. In the next step CMBlu will establish the full supply chain including all pre-products with other industry partners. In addition, a prototype production was set up in Alzenau. CMBlu has already signed contracts with reference customers to implement selected pilot projects over the next two years. As of 2021, the first commercial systems are planned.

    Source: CMBlu and Schaeffler

    FuturENERGY November 18

    Every half year, BloombergNEF runs its Levelised Cost of Electricity (LCOE) analysis, a worldwide assessment of the cost competitiveness of different power generating and energy storage technologies, excluding subsidies. Falling technology costs means that unsubsidised solar and/or onshore wind are now the cheapest source of new bulk power in all major economies except Japan, according to BloombergNEF’s ‘2H 2018 LCOE’ report. This analysis covers nearly 7,000 projects across 20 technologies and 46 countries globally.

    Every half year, BloombergNEF runs its Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) analysis, a worldwide assessment of the cost competitiveness of different power generating and energy storage technologies – excluding subsidies. Falling technology costs means unsubsidised solar and/or onshore wind are now the cheapest source of new bulk power in all major economies except Japan, according to BloombergNEF’s ‘2H 2018 LCOE’ report. This analysis covers nearly 7,000 projects across 20 technologies and 46 countries globally.

    These are the key, high-level results:

    • Solar and/or wind are now the cheapest new source of generation in all major economies, except Japan. This includes China and India, where not long ago coal was king. In India, best-in-class solar and wind plants are now half the cost of new coal plants.
    • The utility-scale PV market in China has contracted by more than a third in 2018 because of policy revisions in that country. This in turn has created a global wave of cheap equipment that has driven the benchmark global levelized cost of new PV (non-tracking) down to $60/MWh in 2H 2018, a 13% drop from the first semester of 2018.
    • BloombergNEF’s benchmark global levelized cost for onshore wind sits at $52/MWh, down 6% from its 1H 2018 analysis. This is on the back of cheaper turbines and a stronger U.S. dollar. Onshore wind is now as cheap as $27/MWh in India and Texas, without subsidy.
    • In most locations in the U.S. today, wind outcompetes combined-cycle gas plants (CCGT) supplied by cheap shale gas as a source of new bulk generation. If the gas price rises above $3/MMBtu, BloombergNEF’s analysis suggests that new and existing CCGT are going to run the risk of becoming rapidly undercut by new solar and wind. This means fewer run-hours and a stronger case for flexible technologies such as gas peaker plants and batteries that do well at lower utilization (capacity factor).
    • Higher interest rates in China and the U.S. over the past two years have put upward pressure on financing costs for PV and wind, but these have been dwarfed by lower equipment costs.
    Fuente/Source: BloombergNEF. Para las plantas térmicas, la gama captura una variedad de factores de capacidad y costes e incluye un precio del carbono en el caso del carbón y el gas. Para los sistemas de almacenamiento más renovables, BNEF asume almacenamiento en baterías de iones de litio de cuatro horas y la gama captura la diversidad de factores de capacidad en el país, así como diferentes relaciones de capacidad entre el almacenamiento y el activo de generación (25% -100 %). Todos los LCOE son sin subsidios./ For thermal plants, the range captures a variety of capacity factors and costs and includes a carbon price in the case of coal and gas. For renewable-plus-storage systems, BNEF assumes a four-hour lithium-ion battery storage and the range captures the diversity of capacity factors in the country, as well as different capacity ratios between the storage and the generating asset (25%-100%). All LCOEs are unsubsidized.
    Fuente/Source: BloombergNEF. Para las plantas térmicas, la gama captura una variedad de factores de capacidad y costes e incluye un precio del carbono en el caso del carbón y el gas. Para los sistemas de almacenamiento más renovables, BNEF asume almacenamiento en baterías de iones de litio de cuatro horas y la gama captura la diversidad de factores de capacidad en el país, así como diferentes relaciones de capacidad entre el almacenamiento y el activo de generación (25% -100 %). Todos los LCOE son sin subsidios./ For thermal plants, the range captures a variety of capacity factors and costs and includes a carbon price in the case of coal and gas. For renewable-plus-storage systems, BNEF assumes a four-hour lithium-ion battery storage and the range captures the diversity of capacity factors in the country, as well as different capacity ratios between the storage and the generating asset (25%-100%). All LCOEs are unsubsidized.
    • In Asia-Pacific, more expensive gas imports mean that new-build combined-cycle gas plants with a levelized cost of $70-117/MWh continue to be less competitive than new coal-fired power at $59-81/MWh. This remains a major hurdle for reducing the carbon intensity of electricity generation in this part of the world.
    • Short-duration batteries are today the cheapest source of new fast-response and peaking capacity in all major economies except the U.S., where cheap gas gives peaker gas plants an edge. As electric vehicle manufacturing ramps-up, battery costs are set to drop another 66% by 2030, according to BloombergNEF’s analysis. This, in turn, means cheaper battery storage for the power sector, lowering the cost of peak power and flexible capacity to levels never reached before by conventional fossil-fuel peaking plants.
    • Batteries co-located with PV or wind are becoming more common. BloombergNEF’s analysis suggests that new-build solar and wind paired with four-hour battery storage systems can already be cost competitive, without subsidy, as a source of dispatchable generation compared with new coal and new gas plants in Australia and India.

    Source: BloombergNEF

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    Recently GoodWe announced that they are starting to take orders for its brand-new ET Series three-phase energy storage inverter which has been already certified by VDE4105. This is the most compact and lightweight inverter in the market with maximum efficiency of 98.3%, equipped with Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS) function, backup overloading, AC charging functions and open-protocol EMS communication system.

    Covering a power range of 5 kW, 8 kW and 10 kW, the ET Series allows 30% DC oversizing to fully maximize yield during extreme hot and cold weather and features a wide battery voltage range of 180 – 550 V to ensure customers flexibility choices and compatibility with different type of lithium battery. Furthermore, it features UPS function to inductive loads such as air conditioners or refrigerators with an automatic switchover time of less than 10 ms. It is also equipped with AC charging function whereas alternative current is able to charge the battery even when the inverter has not met its maximum performance.

    When installing ET Series, battery will not be damaged by accidental swap of the positive and negative polarity which help to ensures safety battery installation. Not only that, GoodWe ET allows backup overloading up to 100%, which allows quick restart for inductive load such as A/C while it will not cause harm to any electrical appliances. The inverter is also in-built with open-protocol EMS communication system as it ensures interconnections between grid companies and batteries to dispatch electricity freely.

    Compact and powerful ET series delivers independence and non-stop energy for both households and commercial applications.

    Source: GoodWe

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