Tags Posts tagged with "energy transition"

energy transition

Buildings account for about a third of total final energy consumption and energy-related emissions globally. They also have very long lifetimes that can impact energy and emissions for decades. But while they are often overlooked, they must play a critical role in the energy transitions. A recent report from the IEA, “Perspectives for the Clean Energy Transitions: The critical role of buildings“, finds there is a risk of a serious lock-in of inefficient buildings as countries without mandatory codes are expected to see an explosion of building construction, half of which by the early 2030s.

The pace and scale of the global clean energy transition is not in line with climate targets. Energy-related CO2 emissions rose again in 2018 by 1.7%. The buildings sector represented 28% of those emissions, two-thirds from rapidly growing electricity use. In fact, since 2000, the rate of electricity demand in buildings increased five-times faster than improvements in the carbon intensity of the power sector.

CO2 emissions need to peak around 2020 and enter a steep decline thereafter. In the Faster Transition Scenario, energy-related emissions drop 75% by 2050. The carbon intensity of the power sector falls by more than 90% and the end-use sectors see a 65% drop, thanks to energy efficiency, renewable energy technologies and shifts to low-carbon electricity. The buildings sector sees the fastest CO2 reduction, falling by an average of 6% per year to one-eighth of current levels by 2050.

Technology can reduce CO2 emissions from buildings while improving comfort and services. In the Faster Transition Scenario, near-zero energy construction and deep energy renovations reduce the sector’s energy needs by nearly 30% to 2050, despite a doubling of global floor area. Energy use is cut further by a doubling in air conditioner efficiency, even as 1.5 billion households gain access to cooling comfort. Heat pumps cut typical energy use for heating by a factor of four or more, while solar thermal delivers carbon-free heat to nearly 3 billion people.

A surge in clean energy investment will ultimately bring savings across the global economy and cut in half the proportion of household income spent on energy. Realising sustainable buildings requires annual capital flows to increase by an average of USD 27 billion over the next decade – a relatively small addition to the USD 4.9 trillion dollars already invested each year in buildings globally. Yet, cumulative household energy spending to 2050 is around USD 5 trillion lower in the Faster Transition Scenario, leading to net savings for consumers, with the average share of household income spent on energy falling from 5% today to around 2.5% by 2050.

Government effort is critical to make sustainable buildings a reality. Immediate action is needed to expand and strengthen mandatory energy policies everywhere, and governments can work together to transfer knowledge and share best practices. Clear policy support for innovation will enable economies of scale and learning rates for industry to deliver solutions with little increase in cost. Policy intervention can also improve access to finance, de-risk clean energy investment and enable market-based instruments that lower the cost of the clean energy transition.

Delaying assertive policy action has major economic implications. Globally, the scale of new buildings likely to be built by 2050 under inadequate energy policies is equivalent to 2.5-times the current building stock in the People’s Republic of China (“China”). Waiting another ten years to act on high-performance buildings construction and renovations would result in more than 2 gigatonnes of additional CO2 emissions from 3.500 million tonnes of oil equivalent of unnecessary energy demand to 2050, increasing global spending on heating and cooling by USD 2.5 trillion.

Source: International Energy Agency (IEA)

0 12

As the cheapest source of electricity in several parts of the world, wind energy has taken a key role in the global energy transition, unlocking growth opportunities in new markets and customer segments for Vestas. To grasp these opportunities, Vestas is executing our strategy to invest in technology and commercial capabilities beyond wind energy technology, enabling us to develop sustainable energy solutions that meet current and future customer demand.

To support Vestas’ strategy and increase our capability to partner with our customers in project development in selective markets, Vestas today announces the acquisition of a 25.1 percent minority stake in SOWITEC with an option to acquire the entire company within three years. Headquartered in Germany, SOWITEC is a leading sustainable energy developer with around 60 wind and solar projects totalling more than 2,600 MW across the globe. By investing in SOWITEC, Vestas enhances our ability to offer full-scope sustainable energy solutions by tapping into SOWITEC’s proven offering within development services.

Juan Araluce, Vestas’ Chief Sales Officer, says “With the acquisition of a minority stake in Sowitec, Vestas gains access to an independent development entity that strengthens our co-development portfolio and improves our solutions and capabilities in strategic markets in Latin America. Vestas is continuing to invest in solutions and capabilities that increase our ability to meet our customers’ evolving needs and to partner with them through the energy transition”.

Frank Hummel, SOWITEC Chief Executive Officer, says “We are proud to have Vestas as a strategic partner that further strengthens our equity and helps us to go further in the value chain. Together with our strong track record in emerging markets and our vast experience in developing utility-scale renewable energy projects, this partnership will help SOWITEC grow faster and give us the chance to profit from Vestas’ worldwide experience and presence”.

Based on SOWITEC’s proven track record within solar PV project development, the acquisition also strengthens Vestas’ offering within hybrid power plant solutions. With sustainable energy’s share of the energy mix set to grow from around 10 percent today to more than 30 percent by 2035, hybrids are a key part of Vestas’ objective to develop sustainable energy solutions with wind at their core. As such, hybrids are emerging as a grid-friendly and cost-effective solution that can store and release renewable energy into the grid when needed, and hereby increase the penetration of onshore wind.

On a stand-alone basis, SOWITEC is expected to report 2018 consolidated revenues of approximately EUR 30 million. The acquisition, which is subject to regulatory approval, is expected to be finalised during the second quarter of 2019 and will have no significant impact on Vestas earnings.

Source: Vestas

As the urgency to take bold climate action grows, new analysis by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) finds that scaling-up renewable energy combined with electrification could deliver more than three quarters of the energy-related emission reductions needed to meet global climate goals. According to the latest edition of IRENA’s Global Energy Transformation: A Roadmap to 2050, launched at the Berlin Energy Transition Dialogue, pathways to meet 86 per cent of global power demand with renewable energy exist. Electricity would cover half of the global final energy mix. Global power supply would more than double over this period, with the bulk of it generated from renewable energy, mostly solar PV and wind.

The race to secure a climate safe future has entered a decisive phase,” said IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera. “Renewable energy is the most effective and readily-available solution for reversing the trend of rising CO2 emissions. A combination of renewable energy with a deeper electrification can achieve 75 per cent of the energy-related emissions reduction needed.

An accelerated energy transition in line with the Roadmap 2050 would also save the global economy up to USD 160 trillion cumulatively over the next 30 years in avoided health costs, energy subsidies and climate damages. Every dollar spent on energy transition would pay off up to seven times. The global economy would grow by 2.5 per cent in 2050. However, climate damages can lead to significant socio-economic losses.

The shift towards renewables makes economic sense,” added Mr. La Camera. “By mid-century, the global economy would be larger, and jobs created in the energy sector would boost global employment by 0.2 per cent. Policies to promote a just, fair and inclusive transition could maximise the benefits for different countries, regions and communities. This would also accelerate the achievement of affordable and universal energy access. The global energy transformation goes beyond a transformation of the energy sector. It is a transformation of our economies and societies.

But action is lagging, the report warns. While energy-related CO2 emissions continued to grow by over 1 per cent annually on average in the last five years, emissions would need to decline by 70 per cent below their current level by 2050 to meet global climate goals. This calls for a significant increase in national ambition and more aggressive renewable energy and climate targets.

IRENA’s roadmap recommends that national policy should focus on zero-carbon long-term strategies. It also highlights the need to boost and harness systemic innovation. This includes fostering smarter energy systems through digitalisation as well as the coupling of end-use sectors, particularly transport, and heating and cooling, via greater electrification, promoting decentralisation and designing flexible power grids.

The energy transformation is gaining momentum, but it must accelerate even faster,” concluded Mr. La Camera. “The UN’s 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda and the review of national climate pledges under the Paris Agreement are milestones for raising the level of ambition. Urgent action on the ground at all levels is vital, in particular unlocking the investments needed to further strengthen the momentum of this energy transformation. Speed and forward-looking leadership will be critical – the world in 2050 depends on the energy decisions we take today.

Source: IRENA

CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel have signed an agreement for the joint development and industrialization of energy converters for organic redox flow batteries. The aim of both partners is to support electric mobility through the development of the charging infrastructure and offer the energy sector a sustainable and highly cost-efficient storage technology for a successful energy transition.

From the idea to the laboratory, then series production

The business idea for redox flow batteries with organic electrolytes derived from lignin (‘Organic Flow’) was already conceived in 2011 and since 2014, CMBlu has carried out intensive research and development. These batteries essentially consist of two tanks of liquid electrolyte and an energy converter, which consists of a large number of adjacent rows of cells and is therefore also referred to as a battery stack. The liquids are pumped through the battery stacks and is charged or discharged as required.

The technology developed by CMBlu has now reached the prototype stage. The further development and industrialization of the battery stack is regulated in the long-term cooperation agreement with Mann+Hummel. For this purpose Mann+Hummel has created a spin-off named i2M, which is dedicated to the development and commercialization of innovative technologies. In the next step Mann+Hummel will build a complete production line in an European plant. CMBlu will realize special pilot projects with reference customers in the next two years. Starting in 2021, CMBlu plans to market the first commercial systems.

Benefits of organic flow batteries

Similar to the principle of conventional redox flow batteries, CMBlu’s organic flow batteries store electrical energy in aqueous solutions of organic chemical compounds derived from lignin that are pumped through the energy converter, i.e. battery stack. The special feature of the flow batteries is that the capacity and electrical output can be scaled independently. The number of stacks defines the output of the batteries. A higher number of stacks multiplies the output. The capacity of the battery is only limited by the size of the tanks. This allows flexible customization to take into account the respective application area. For example, solar power can be stored for several hours and then fed into the grid at night.

In order to achieve cost-effective mass production, the most important components in the stack were adjusted to the organic electrolyte. In this process, almost the entire value chain for the stacks can be supplied locally. There is no dependency on imports from other countries. In addition, the battery stacks do not require rare-earth metals or heavy metals. The aqueous electrolytes in the system are not combustible or explosive and can be used safely.

Variety of applications in the grid

Organic flow batteries are suitable for numerous application areas in the power grid such as the intermediate storage of power from renewable energy generation or in connection with the balancing of demand peaks in industrial companies. An additional application area is the charging infrastructure required for electric mobility. The batteries enable a buffer storage to relieve power grids which do not have to be upgraded for additional loads. It enables simultaneous fast charging of electric vehicles. Ultimately, a decentralized charging network for electric vehicles will only be possible in connection with a high performance and scalable energy storage system.

Nature as a model for energy storage

The concept is based on the mode of energy in the human body. In the citric acid cycle the body also uses a redox reaction of organic molecules. CMBlu has now succeeded in applying this principle to large-scale storage of electrical energy. For this purpose the company use the mostly unused resource of lignin, which is readily available in unlimited quantities and accrues in amounts of millions of tons annually in the pulp and paper industry. CMBlu’s technology enables a very large and cost effective energy storage system. The battery stack is the core of the system and requires the highest quality and process reliability in the production process.

The manufacture of electrolytes includes a number of filtration steps, which Mann+Hummel performs using new special membranes. This technology further expands its product range and at the same time contributes to build the infractruture needed for electric vehicles.

Source: CMBlu Energy and Mann+Hummel

LCOE global de referencia: fotovoltaica, eólica y baterías. Fuente BNEF. / Global LCOE benchmarks – PV, wind and batteries. Source: BloombergNEF.

Two technologies that were immature and expensive only a few years ago but are now at the center of the unfolding low-carbon energy transition have seen spectacular gains in cost-competitiveness in the last year. The latest analysis by research company BloombergNEF (BNEF) shows that the benchmark LCOE for lithium-ion batteries has fallen 35% to $187 per megawatt-hour since the first half of 2018. Meanwhile, the benchmark LCOE for offshore wind has tumbled by 24%.

Onshore wind and photovoltaic solar have also gotten cheaper, their respective benchmark LCOE reaching $50 and $57 per megawatt-hour for projects starting construction in early 2019, down 10% and 18% on the equivalent figures of a year ago.

BNEF’s analysis shows that the LCOE per megawatt-hour for onshore wind, solar PV and offshore wind have fallen by 49%, 84% and 56% respectively since 2010. That for lithium-ion battery storage has dropped by 76% since 2012, based on recent project costs and historical battery pack prices. Looking back over this decade, there have been staggering improvements in the cost-competitiveness of these low-carbon options, thanks to technology innovation, economies of scale, stiff price competition and manufacturing experience.

The most striking finding in this LCOE Update, for the first-half of 2019, is on the cost improvements in lithium-ion batteries. These are opening up new opportunities for them to balance a renewables-heavy generation mix. Batteries co-located with solar or wind projects are starting to compete, in many markets and without subsidy, with coal- and gas-fired generation for the provision of ‘dispatchable power’ that can be delivered whenever the grid needs it (as opposed to only when the wind is blowing, or the sun is shining).

Electricity demand is subject to pronounced peaks and lows inter-day. Meeting the peaks has previously been the preserve of technologies such as open-cycle gas turbines and gas reciprocating engines, but these are now facing competition from batteries with anything from one to four hours of energy storage, according to the report.

Offshore wind has often been seen as a relatively expensive generation option compared to onshore wind or solar PV. However, auction programs for new capacity, combined with much larger turbines, have produced sharp reductions in capital costs, taking BNEF’s global benchmark for this technology below $100 per MWh, compared to more than $220 just five years ago.

Although the LCOE of solar PV has fallen 18% in the last year, the great majority of that decline happened in the third quarter of 2018, when a shift in Chinese policy caused there to be a huge global supply glut of modules, rather than over the most recent months.

Source: BloombergNEF

In order to make the energy transition possible, the Red Eléctrica Group, through its subsidiary Red Eléctrica de España, will invest a total of 3,221 million euros nationwide in the development of the high voltage transmission grid and in electricity system operation. This figure represents just over half (53%) of the total investment of 6 billion euros that the Company plans to make in the coming years as part of its new 2018-2022 Strategic Plan and that will focus on the integration of renewables.

Of the more than 3,000 million euros that have been earmarked for the energy transition, 1,538 million will be focused on the integration of clean energy (47%), 908 million on bolstering the reliability of the transmission grids and strengthening security of supply, 434 million will be allocated to continue implementing cutting-edge technological and digital tools, 215 million to boost energy storage projects and 54 million will be earmarked for energy control systems.

Both as the transmission agent and system operator, we work to respond to the needs of the energy transition, providing the technology that enables a smarter system in order to further guarantee the security and quality of supply with a higher share of intermittent renewable generation, and at the same time be able to manage an electricity system that is increasingly more complex and which makes it possible to integrate a greater number of energy sources distributed nationwide.

With regard to the development and strengthening of the transmission grid, the road map for 2019 onwards encompasses a great number of projects, many of which are already in the implementation phase. Many of them are key for achieving the European Union’s targets set out in their energy and environmental policy: for example, the interconnection with France across the Bay of Biscay in order to continue making progress towards reaching the cross-border interconnection capacity target with France set at 10%, or many other projects scattered nationwide focused on integrating new renewable generation and that seek to contribute to achieving a share of 32% of carbon-free energy in the generation mix by 2030.

2018 has seen the start of many of projects aimed at facilitating the energy transition. In this regard and with this objective in mind, the total investment made by the Company in transmission grid development in the last twelve months has amounted to 378.2 million euros.

In 2018, some particularly relevant projects were undertaken:

  • The Canary Islands Wind Energy Plan. This plan encompasses the development of the transmission grid in order to provide it with sufficient connection points and capacity to evacuate new wind energy generation.
  • The Arenal – Cala Blava – Llucmajor axis (Majorca). A project aimed at improving support for electricity distribution in the central area of the island of Majorca and facilitating the integration of renewables.
  • The San Miguel de Salinas – Torrevieja line (Alicante). This project helps provide better electricity supply to Torrevieja, as well as contribute to supporting the distribution network and increasing security of supply.
  • The Cañuelo – Pinar axis (Cádiz). This project helps support the electricity distribution network in the area and helps deal with the high level of demand coming from the Port of Algeciras and the Campo de Gibraltar.
  • The 400/220 kV La Farga substation and the associated incoming and outgoing feeder lines (Girona). This project helps strengthen the existing 220-kV grid by connecting it to the 400-kV grid in order to guarantee the security of supply and to support the electricity distribution network in the province of Girona.
  • The Arbillera line (Zamora). This project is designed to provide power for the high speed ​​train in the Zamora-Ourense railway section.
  • The incoming and outgoing feeder lines of the Moncayo substation (Soria). This project facilitates the evacuation of installed renewable generation capacity in the area and strengthens the guarantee of supply in the province of Soria.

2018 has also brought with it other relevant data that reflect the efforts being made by the Company to help make the energy transition a reality and, in particular, the integration of renewables nationwide. Thus, peninsular electricity generation that produces zero CO2 emissions reached a share of 62.5%, compared to 57% in 2017, representing an increase of 5.5 percentage points. This increase in clean generation resulted in 15% less emissions: going from 63.8 million tonnes in 2017 to 54.2 million tonnes in 2018. With regard to combined cycle and coal-fired technologies, these have decreased their share in the generation mix by 22% and 18%, respectively, compared to the previous year.

Nuclear energy (20.6%) continues to be ranked in the top position within the generation mix, nonetheless, in 2018 it was followed closely by wind energy (19%). As a whole, renewable generation has gone from 33.7% to 40.1% in the peninsular system, representing an increase of 6.4 percentage points. In the complete set of renewable energy technologies, wind represented 49%, hydro 34%, solar 11%, and the other renewable technologies represented 5%. All this data is taken from the ‘Spanish Electricity System – Preliminary Report 2018’ published by Red Eléctrica.

The five pillars of the 2018-2022 Strategic Plan

Facilitating the energy transition is just the first of the pillars of the new Strategic Plan of the Red Eléctrica Group. Although the Company is especially focused on this area, in keeping with its key role as transmission agent and operator of the electricity system, there are other goals that it is also undertaking: expanding the telecommunications business to become a strategic global telecom infrastructure operator; expanding its activity abroad in the electricity and telecommunications sectors; becoming a reference in technological innovation in the fields associated with the activities it carries out, and strengthening its operational efficiency and financial soundness.

In order to achieve these goals, the Company will invest a total of 6 billion euros over the next five years based on a balanced business model between the Company’s regulated activities and those operations subject to market risk and by diversifying business in a controlled manner, thereby boosting the expansion of operations in Spain as well as in the international arena. In addition, an improved business structure will be defined and implemented within the Group and the resources of its various subsidiaries will be strengthened.

This new Strategic Plan is the Company’s response to the challenges posed by the transformation of the production system model, marked by sustainability and the technological disruption. Electricity, telecommunications and talent are considered today as the new raw materials of economic development and are also the distinguishing features of Red Eléctrica’s new strategy.

Source: Red Eléctrica de España

Fuentes: Elaborado por AleaSoft con datos de REE y del Ministerio para la Transición Ecológica / Source: Prepared by AleaSoft using data from REE and the Ministry for the Ecological Transition

AleaSoft analyses the content of the Integrated National Energy and Climate Plan and its proposals for the electricity sector, where the role that the consultancy foresees for hydrogen technologies is lacking.

The Integrated National Energy and Climate Plan (NECP) is a broad and cross-cutting document that addresses the goal of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emission from many angles, from transportation and electricity generation, to employment and R&D. The objective of the Plan is to achieve a 20% reduction in emissions in 2030 compared to the levels recorded in 1990. This means reducing the current emission levels by more than 30%. The draft lays the foundations to advance in the energy transition and achieve the ultimate goal of totally decarbonising the economy and converting Spain into a carbon neutral country by 2050.

In the energy transition and the reduction of polluting gas emissions, electricity generation will have a central role. The electricity generation sector is one of the most responsible for the emission of CO2 and other greenhouse gases, but it is also one of the sectors with the greatest power to reduce emissions thanks to the production of electricity from renewable energy sources.

The objective of the Plan is to achieve, in the year 2030, a penetration of renewable energy sources in the final energy consumption of at least 35%. Specifically for the electricity system, the objective is the generation of at least 70% of the electricity from renewable sources by 2030 and with the final goal of 100% by 2050. To do this, the NECP proposes to install 69 GW of renewable capacity before 2030, and reduce conventional generation by 15 GW.

The star technology in this renewable revolution will be the solar energy with new 37 GW, of which 32 GW will be of photovoltaic technology and 5 GW of solar thermal. This new capacity to be installed represents an increase of 530% compared to the current power. The second potential technology to be installed before 2030 is the wind energy with new 27 GW and a capacity growth of 114%. And behind the solar and the wind energy, with much less new capacity are the rest of renewable technologies that will add another 5 GW.

On the side of the reduction of conventional generation, the technology that is intended to be eliminated more quickly is coal. In 2030, it is expected to have removed at least 8.7 GW from the current 10 GW, but with the possibility of closing 100% of the power plants if security of supply allows it. The Plan estimates that coal thermal power stations will no longer be competitive by 2030 if the price of CO2 emission rights reaches 35 €/t. Right now, the price of emissions is around 23 €/t after it tripled in 2018.

The other conventional technology condemned to disappear according to the draft is the nuclear. By 2030 it is expected to halve the installed capacity by closing 4 GW. On a smaller scale, the other technologies to be reduced are cogeneration, generation with waste and fuel-gas.

The willingness of the Plan to withdraw up to 2 GW of cogeneration is somehow surprising. The employers of the sector have already shown their disagreement. Cogeneration is one of the most efficient ways to produce heat for the industry. Producing all that thermal energy directly using electricity would be a disproportionate expense for those industries. According to AleaSoft, the best strategy to reduce emissions in industries that require heat is cogeneration with renewable gas or even with hydrogen, which, according to the consultancy, is the fuel of the future and, in addition, does not produce emissions.

As highlighted by AleaSoft, the renewable transition proposal of the Plan shows very explicitly the need that renewable energies continue to have a backup technology due to its intermittent nature: to remove 15 GW of conventional capacity it is necessary to install 69 GW of renewable capacity . The draft is committed to maintaining gas as a backup technology, maintaining the installed capacity of this technology at least until 2030. But the support for intermittent renewable production is also addressed from two other angles: storage and interconnections.

In terms of energy storage, the Plan will promote the pumped storage hydropower plants with new 3.5 GW that allow the management of renewable production and, additionally, can support the regulation of watersheds in conditions of extreme phenomena. The installation of up to 2.5 GW of batteries is also contemplated gradually as the technology matures.

In AleaSoft the mention of hydrogen is lacking as a tool for storing large amounts of energy over long periods of time, being able to counteract the seasonality of a large part of the renewable production. In the Plan, hydrogen is only mentioned as an alternative fuel for transportation.

On the interconnection side, the Plan contemplates the already planned projects to increase interconnections with France up to 8000 MW and with Portugal up to 3000 MW. Even with these increases in exchange capacity, Spain will not achieve a 10% interconnection with respect to its total installed capacity and will continue far from the minimum target of 15% of the European Union.

The draft Plan also takes into account the increase in energy efficiency as an essential tool for the energy transition.

Other important aspects that the draft also takes into account are self-consumption and, in general, a more active role for the consumer. With the approval of the Plan, the demand aggregator will be created as the new subject of the electricity sector to boost the participation of demand in the ancillary services. It is promoted that the aggregation of demand allows a greater participation of distributed generation and self-consumption in the imbalance and ancillary markets.

Source: AleaSoft Energy Forecasting

InnoEnergy, Naturgy, Enagás, Barcelona Activa and CEiiA are promoting the 4th call for entries of Cleantech Camp, a programme designed for business ideas or start-ups that are entering the clean energy sector.

The programme, that will fund pilot projects with their industrial partners, will be implemented in Barcelona, Madrid and Porto and promotes Open Innovation. It will select a maximum of 15 aspiring projects and award funding amounting to over €50,000 to incentivise their development.

The programme promoters expect to receive ideas from which they can select projects that promote an efficient use of energy, the application of sustainable energies, the energy transition and digitisation in the field of energy. Cleantech Camp is looking for digital projects with an industrial vocation geared towards energy efficiency that facilitate the energy transition, distributed generation empowering the consumer, whose applications are developed on the basis of new technologies such as the blockchain, the use of Big Data and AI.

One of this year’s innovations is the inclusion of projects that focus on biogas, biomethane, hydrogen and Smart Factory, in addition to other themes already associated with the programme namely, energy efficiency, sustainable mobility, smart grids and smart cities and sustainable and renewable energy.

The selected projects will follow a training programme in Barcelona, Madrid and Porto over several weeks, and will benefit from the participation of ESADE as a training partner. The course will combine training and informative sessions, specialised workshops for the development of the projects and networking meetings, coordinated by different experts.

The projects will additionally be able to access working spaces at Barcelona Activa, the InnovaHub at Naturgy, the Enagás FAB and Enagás Venture Center in Madrid and the CEiiA facilities in Porto.

Global programme partners, Naturgy and Enagás, announce the following challenges

Naturgy is looking for solutions in the following fields:

• Artificial Intelligence applied to the client.
• Combined renewable gas and renewable electricity solutions.

It is also seeking new business models in:

• Sustainable mobility.
• Batteries and self-consumption.

Enagás is focusing on the following solutions and business models:

• Sustainable mobility using:
o VNG,
o renewable gas (biogas-biomethane),
o Power2Gas, and
o renewable hydrogen generation.
• Solutions for storage, regasification and the transport of natural gas and other renewable gases.

In June, the top three projects offering the greatest potential will be selected out of all the participants, receiving funding of €20,000, €10,000 and €5,000 respectively. These projects will also benefit from other contributions in kind from the different programme collaborators, to promote their growth and consolidation. One of the main innovations in this year’s edition is that the selected start-ups must submit a commercial pilot of their project. The Cleantech Camp jury will select three pilots to be co-funded by the programme and developed jointly with Naturgy, Enagás and CEiiA.

Fostering Open Innovation

Cleantech Camp is driven by InnoEnergy, Naturgy, Enagás (through its Corporate Entrepreneurship and Open Innovation Programme, ‘Enagás Emprende’) and Barcelona Activa. It enjoys the collaboration of the Portuguese research centre, CEiiA and the companies Ateknea, ZBM and Osborne that act as Knowledge Partners, bringing their expertise to the table in the fields of patents, legal regulations and public funding.

The programme is clearly committed to promoting Open Innovation between the driver companies and participating start-ups, in order to create a knowledge exchange ecosystem from which both large companies and emerging projects can benefit.

Register to take part in the programme online at www.cleantechcamp.com from 23 January to 24 February.

FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

The home straight of 2018 has brought with it an avalanche of information at national and global level that shares a common thread: the form the reality of an energy transition will take, whose context is the fight against climate change and a new consumption model that has to efficiently accommodate the growing needs of humankind with the resources available…By Arturo Pérez de Lucia, Managing Director of AEDIVE, the Business Association for the Boosting and Development of the EV Market.

FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

MARCONA de David Huamani. Primer premio del Concurso de Fotografía Eolo 2017 MARCONA by David Huamani. First prize in the 2017 Eolo Photography Competition

The future of wind power in Spain is promising and unstoppable. The sector is ready to successfully develop the growth of its wind farm stock and, one of its immediate challenges, before March 2020, is to put into operation the wind power capacity from the three auctions held in 2016 and 2017, in other words, 4,600 MW of new wind capacity plus the Canary Island quota. The installation of this capacity is an opportunity for market growth and will have a positive effect…By Juan Virgilio Márquez, Managing Director of AEE, the Spanish Wind Energy Association.

COMEVAL