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Capgemini has published the 21st edition of its annual study, the World Energy Markets Observatory (WEMO) report, created in partnership with De Pardieu Brocas Maffei and Vaasa ETT. The findings point to global energy demand and Green House Gases (GHG) emissions rising in 2018, threatening progress towards climate change goals.

Despite the continuing growth and falling cost of renewable energy sources, coal, oil and gas remain the cornerstone of growing energy consumption. Energy transition is also threatened by geopolitical and commercial tensions, and the declining level of clean energy investment. Critically, without bolder measures that go beyond existing energy transition policies, the world will very likely fail to meet the objectives of the Paris accord.

Key points of the 2019 edition of the World Energy Markets Observatory report include:

1. Greenhouse gases on the rise – climate change goals under threat
Efforts to reduce Green House Gases (GHG) emissions stalled in 2018, with growth of 2% compared to a 1.6% increase in 2017 and no growth in Europe over 2014-16. GHG emissions were up in China by 2.3%, in the US by 3.4% and in India by 6.4%. These increases were driven by booming energy consumption, which grew globally at 2.3% in 2018, nearly twice the average annual growth rate since 2010. Almost 75% of that growth was driven by oil, gas and coal consumption, the highest share since 2013. Worldwide, there was a 4% increase in coal consumption, with a significant growth in coal-fired power generation.

2. Renewables remain the fastest-growing segment, with tech enabling lower costs
In parallel, renewables retained their status as the fastest-growing energy source worldwide, at 14.5% in 2018. Renewable energy sources continue to get cheaper, with the electricity cost of solar photovoltaic and onshore wind declining by 13%, and that of offshore wind by 1%.
However, investment in clean energy is on the decline. In the first half of 2019 it totalled $217.6bn, 14% lower than the same period in 2018. Investment declined sharply in China, down by 39% and more moderately in the US (6%) and Europe (4%). By contrast, in India it rose by 10% to $5.9 billion.

3. By 2040, significant disruptions will be enabled from technology and digital combinations
Renewables energy costs continue to decrease but soft costs (acceptance), intermittency and distribution prevent for the moment these technologies to be definitively more competitive than most of the schedulable electricity generation source.
No energy related technical breakthroughs are expected to be industrialized by the 2040 horizon. However, improvement of existing technologies will continue enabling a lower cost of renewables, electric batteries, Electric Vehicles, and small modular nuclear reactors. In addition, hydrogen for storage and mobility as well as superconductivity should be at the industrial stage cites the report. Hybrid renewable farms will also have expanded.

4. Europe leads the march to low carbon
Comparatively, Europe is proving up to now the most successful region in combatting climate change and implementing energy transition. Its energy demand growth was markedly lower than the rest of the world, growing by only 0.2% in 2018 compared to the global level of 2.3%. Germany leads the way, having seen a 2.2% reduction in its demand.
Europe is on track to meet two of the three core climate objectives set by the EU for 2020: to effect a 20% reduction in GHG emissions compared to 1990, and to ensure renewables comprise at least 20% of energy consumption. National Governments have recently confirmed carbon reduction plans, including in France to cease coal-fired power generation by 2022 and generate 50% of electricity from nuclear by 2035; and in Germany to switch off all coal power plants – which accounted for 37% of its electricity generation last year – by 2038. But the challenge for 2030 and beyond remains difficult to meet.

5. Geopolitical tensions and energy concerns are increasingly interrelated
Both the US and China have leveraged their growing energy market dominance to their advantage in geopolitics. For the US, the growth in shale production has allowed it to overcome dependency on the Middle East: by 2025 it is expected to account for over half of the global growth in oil and gas production (75% and 40% respectively). This emerging oil independence has enabled the administration’s crackdown on OPEC nations such as Iran and Venezuela. China produces 95% of rare earth and metals which are needed to accelerate Energy Transition, a strategic advantage.

6. China and India, giant consumers and CO2 emitters, experience very different positions on energy markets
China has cemented its leadership status as a mature giant market, where energy is provided to all inhabitants, with the development of coal-fired power plants, with 70% of worldwide market share, and installed battery capacity (61%). China leads on the supply of most related technologies (such as fossil fuel, renewables and storage: 7 of the 10 largest worldwide equipment suppliers are Chinese). While its low-cost solar panels are becoming widespread, the report highlights that tomorrow China could also lead on nuclear technology, with 2 EPRs[1] already connected successfully to the grid. China is also responsible for supplying 95% of the global demand for rare earth metals used in high tech applications.

In India, the question is more focused on providing electricity to all (“24/7 Power for all” program).
Both countries will remain highly dependent on coal fired plants for at least 2 decades to meet domestic energy growing demand and will remain large CO2 emitters.

More must be done to meet climate goals

The report found that, given current consumption trends, existing climate change goals are looking unrealistic. However, to create meaningful impact, Governments need to go beyond the energy transition measures they already have in place. The report recommends:
• Raising carbon prices to the level that will boost carbon-free investment
• Increased use and reliance on renewable energy
• Grow Electric Vehicle recharging infrastructures
• Increasing financing for carbon capture, usage and storage RD&D
• Promoting clean coal combustion technologies in power plants
• Dedicating 100% of the proceeds from environmental taxes to energy transition projects (from current level of less than 50%)
• Paving the way on building refurbishment to make them more energy efficient
• Relying on Utilities and financial institutions to participate in the effort
• Starting programs in order to achieve behavorial changes of any individual

The World Energy Markets Observatory is an annual publication by Capgemini that monitors the main indicators of the electricity and gas markets in North America, Europe, Australia, South-East Asia, including for the first time this year China and India, and reports on the developments and transformations in these sectors. The 21st edition, which is drafted mainly from public data combined with Capgemini’s expertise in the energy sector, refers to data from 2018 and winter 2018/2019. Special expertise on regulation and customer behavior has been provided by research teams at De Pardieu Brocas Maffei and VaasaETT.

Source: Capgemini

The first-of-a-kind commercially-ready offshore wave power generation device is soon to be completed thanks to the experts from Finnish-based AW-Energy. The team has deployed its WaveRoller® device offshore at Peniche, a seaside municipality and a city in Portugal.

The WaveRoller® has been installed 820 metres offshore from Peniche. At this phase of the installation, data are being collected 24/7 to monitor the performance of the device using motion, pressure and strain gauge sensors that are engineered in to its panel, foundation and bearings. The data collected indicate WaveRoller® is operating well and performance is in accordance with expectations.

Extended sea trials are being used to fine-tune the WaveRoller®’s control system to maximise its performance and yield. Engineers are also monitoring the device’s performance using the company’s next generation monitoring software which can be used to remotely access the device by any of the engineers from anywhere in the world and at any time, to help assess and manage the performance of WaveRoller®.

The next phase of the project is injecting the power output to the Portuguese National Transmission Grid from the onshore substation. Commissioning work is already in progress with the local authorities to connect the substation to the local grid which will ensure residents of Peniche can benefit from sustainable energy supply using wave energy.”

The deployment of WaveRoller® in Peniche is an important step forward in AW-Energy’s mission to test the end-to-end commercial and technical capabilities of its latest wave energy device.

Source: AW-Energy

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LONGi has been elected as “Best Equipment Supplier” by world energy giant Iberdrola at the “Supplier of the Year Awards 2019” ceremony held in Bilbao, Spain.

The award for “Best Equipment Supplier” has been awarded to LONGi, recognized for its firm commitment to product value creation and efficiency. LONGi is the only PV modules supplier and the only overseas enterprise among all elected enterprises conducted by Iberdrola. 11 companies in total have been distinguished by Iberdrola this year with its “Supplier of the Year” awards.

2The Iberdrola “Supplier of the Year Awards 2019” consists of 10 categories and recognizes the key role of the value chain in achieving the group’s strategic projects, underlines the importance of creating an ecosystem of suppliers working with the same objectives and reiterates the commitment to incentivize business management in areas such as sustainable development, safety and quality, innovation, internationalization and job creation.

Li Zhenguo, President of LONGi, attended the grand ceremony among 250 distinguished guests and received the “Best Equipment Supplier Award” from the CEO of Iberdrola Ángeles Santamaría Martín at its global headquarters in Spain. “LONGi always attaches great importance to collaborate with Iberdrola as a global partner. The award is a recognition of LONGi’s products and services, and a very good beginning of long-term cooperation with Iberdrola to achieve the global goal of sustainable development.” said Li Zhenguo.

Source: LONGi

The publicly owned company Econssa Chile S.A., responsible for ensuring access to potable water and wastewater collection and treatment services in nine regions of the country, has awarded Acciona the supply of 100% renewable electricity to the desalination plant it is now building in the municipality of Caldera in the region of Atacama.

According to the terms of the PPA, the contract will come into effect in November 2019, with a long-term horizon to cover all the desalination plant’s electricity requirements. It is the sixth PPA for the supply of energy singed by Acciona in Chile.

All the electricity supplied by Acciona will come from the company’s renewables plants in the country, where it currently has 291 MW in service and facilities under construction –some of them in the final phase of assembly and start-up- totaling 393 MW.

1,200 liters of water per second

In a context of water shortages in many parts of the country, Econssa has been building a seawater desalination plant since early 2018. Its total production capacity of 1,200 l/s will cover the consumption of people living in four municipalities in Atacama. Until now, this supply was covered by a spring.

Initially, the electricity supplied will allow Econssa to carry out the first technical tests on the plant. The energy supply will gradually increase as the three stages of the start-up of the plant are completed, from 450 l/s in the first phase to 1,200 l/s when it is operating at full capacity.

Sixth PPA in Chile

The supply contract signed with Econssa joins others signed with major corporate clients in Chile. For example, with Google for the supply of electricity to its data center; the distribution chain Falabella, to supply around one hundred stores of the group and its subsidiaries; Aguas Chañar for its end-to-end water facilities in the region of Atacama; LATAM Airlines Group for its corporate offices and operation and maintenance base in Santiago airport, and the National Mining Company of Chile (ENAMI) to supply its plants in the regions of Antofagasta, Atacama and Coquimbo, as well as the consumption associated with the modernization of a publicly-owned copper casting facility.

Acciona has also signed supply contracts with all the distributors and cooperatives in the country following an energy tender for the consumption of regulated clients called “Tender 2013/03, 2nd call” and “Tender 2015/01”.

Source: Acciona

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Long-term contracts, known as power purchase agreements, are transforming how companies buy and sell renewables-based electricity in Europe with profound implications for the sector.

Scope Ratings says the surging demand for PPAs represents a profound shift in risk-bearing in the sector: from operators of unregulated renewable energy power plants (utilities, independent power producers and financial investors), on the one hand, to so-called off-takers, on the other. Besides energy suppliers, owners of generation assets increasingly find direct buyers with energy-intensive corporates.

For the seller of electricity under a PPA, the PPA can be considered a tool of risk transformation,” says Sebastian Zank, analyst at Scope. “For the off-takers, the long-term visibility on energy procurement, potential for profit associated with PPAs and reputational benefits offset the extra risk they take on,” Zank says.

We believe the overall impact of PPAs for sellers and off-takers is credit-supportive,” he says. However, the overall impact depends on the specifications of used PPAs and the impact on a seller’s revenue and margin recognition or an off-taker’s raw material procurement strategy.

PPAs do, however, introduce significant counterparty and forecasting risk because the contracts are complex, non-standardised transactions between a buyer and a seller unlike hedging transactions for conventional sources of electricity which typically take place on power exchanges or through short-term contracts.

The primary catalysts for PPA take-up in Europe are the phasing out of subsidies for newly installed wind and solar assets across Europe and the achievement of “grid parity” in many countries whereby solar- and wind-powered electricity generation has become competitive on price with coal, gas and nuclear power.

Owners of unregulated renewable energy assets/projects – such as Encavis, Energparc, Energiekontor, Neoen, Akuo – renewables divisions of large European utilities or financial investors – such as Octopus Investments, Aquila Capital, Greencoat Capital, Luxcara – have a natural interest to hedge electricity sales over a longer time horizon. Such long-term hedges in the form of PPAs are already well established with off-takers such as energy traders or utility incumbents, for example: Engie, Vattenfall, Axpo, Alpiq, Uniper among others.

Extra demand for PPAs is increasingly coming from industrial and corporate consumers, particularly energy-intensive companies. Aluminium supplier Alcoa, steelmaker ArcelorMittal and state railway companies Deutsche Bahn and SNCF are among those with PPAs in Europe wanting to procure environmentally friendly power supplies which they can use to burnish their “green credentials,” hence recent PPAs with renewable-energy suppliers.

The global market for corporate PPAs with direct consumers of electricity is set for a new global high this year, with the 13 GW contracted in the first nine months of the year already at the level of mid-to-long-term PPAs signed for all of 2018 – itself a record year – with much of the growth in the Americas.

Europe is catching up: “We expect continued strong growth in Europe judging by recent corporate PPAs struck in Q3 2019,” says Zank.

PPAs in EMEA, primarily Europe, will likely cover a renewables capacity of around 3 GW of electricity this year, up 30% from 2018. And this volume comes on top of the PPA signed between sellers and energy suppliers which is estimated at a volume of between 7 and 10 GW per annum (Source: Pexapark).

Another shift related to the rise in use of PPAs is the growing competition that the trading/supply businesses of incumbent European utilities face from smaller competitors. Consumers can directly procure energy volumes directly from the generator without an intermediary and newcomers, such as the energy-supply arm of British Octopus Energy, or smaller energy suppliers, such as Audax Renovables or Factorenergia, can source electricity using PPAs struck with individual renewable-energy projects without necessarily having generating assets of their own.

In doing so, they can take on the trading and even retail operations of the incumbents,” says Zank.

Source: Scope Ratings

The energy transition requires more than 10 times solar and 5 times wind power in combination with other technology measures to limit global warming to well below 2°C and meet the targets of the Paris Agreement, according to DNV GL’s latest Energy Transition Outlook: Power Supply and Use report. The report finds that the energy transition is gathering pace more quickly than previously thought but the rate is still too slow to limit global temperatures rising by well below 2°C as set out in the Paris Agreement.

At the projected pace, DNV GL’s forecast indicates a world that is most likely to be 2.4°C warmer at the end of this century than in the immediate pre-industrial period. The technology already exists to curb emissions enough to hit the climate target. What is needed to ensure this happens are far-reaching policy decisions.

DNV GL recommends that the following technology measures are put in place to help close the emissions gap, the difference between the forecasted rate at which our energy system is decarbonizing and the pace we need to reach, to limit global warming to well below 2°C as set out by the Paris Agreement.

This combination of measures includes:

  1. Grow solar power by more than ten times to 5 TW and wind by 5 times to 3TW by 2030, which would meet 50% of the global electricity use per year.
  2. 50-fold increase in production of batteries for the 50 M electric vehicles needed per year by 2030, alongside investments in new technology to store excess electric energy and solutions that allow our electricity grids to cope with the growing influx of solar and wind power.
  3. Create new infrastructure for charging electric vehicles on a large scale.
  4. More than 1.5 MM$ of annual investment needed for the expansion and reinforcement of power grids by 2030, including ultra-high-voltage transmission networks and extensive demand-response solutions to balance variable wind and solar power.
  5. Increase global energy efficiency improvements by 3.5% per year within the next decade.
  6. Green hydrogen to heat buildings and industry, fuel transport and make use of excess renewable energy in the power grid.
  7. For the heavy industry sector: increased electrification of manufacturing processes, including electrical heating. Onsite renewable sources combined with storage solutions.
  8. Heat-pump technologies and improved insulation.
  9. Massive rail expansion both for city commuting and long-distance passenger and cargo transport.
  10. Rapid and wide deployment of carbon capture, utilization and storage installations.

The staggering pace of the energy transition continues. DNV GL’s report forecasts that by 2050 power generation from solar photovoltaic and wind energy will be 36,000 terawatt hours per year, more than 20 times today’s output. Greater China and India will have the largest share of solar energy by mid-century, with a 40% share of global installed PV capacity in China, followed by the Indian Subcontinent at 17%.

Globally, renewable energy will provide almost 80% of the world’s electricity by 2050 according to the report. The electrification will see increasing use of heat pumps, electric arc furnaces and an electric vehicle revolution, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2032 being electric vehicles.

Despite this rapid pace, the energy transition is not fast enough. DNV GL’s forecast indicates that, alarmingly, for a 1.5°C warming limit, the remaining carbon budget will be exhausted as early as 2028, with an overshoot of 770 Gt CO2 in 2050.

The report also demonstrates that the energy transition is affordable, the world will spend an ever-smaller share of GDP on energy. Global expenditure on energy is currently 3.6% of GDP but that will fall to 1.9% by 2050. This is due to the plunging costs of renewables and other efficiencies, allowing for greater investment to accelerate the transition.

DNV GL appeals to all 197 countries that signed the Paris Agreement to raise and realize increased ambitions for their updated Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020. In a snapshot of the first NDCs submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat, 75% currently refer to renewable energy, and 58% to energy efficiency. DNV GL calls on political leaders that both these percentages need to be 100% in the second NDCs.

Energy efficiency is the fastest-growing segment of U.S. energy sector employment, now employing more than 2.3 million Americans, according to a new analysis from E4TheFuture and the national, nonpartisan business group E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs). Energy efficiency workers now account for 28% of all U.S. energy jobs.

The new report, Energy Efficiency Jobs in America, finds energy efficiency jobs grew 3.4 percent in 2018 –more than double the rate of growth for overall jobs nationwide — with 7.8% growth projected for 2019. Among the states, California leads energy efficiency employment with 318,500 jobs, followed by Texas (162,800), New York (123,300), Florida (118,400), and Illinois (89,400). Thirteen states saw efficiency jobs increase by more than five percent in 2018, led by New Mexico (11.6%), Nevada (8.1%), Oklahoma (7.2%), Colorado (7.2%), and New Jersey (7.1%). Not a single state saw declines in energy efficiency employment in 2018.

Efficiency businesses added 76,000 net new jobs in 2018, accounting for half of all net jobs added by America’s energy sector (151,700). The sector also employed twice the number of workers in 2018 as all fossil fuel industries combined (1.18 million). There are now more than 360,000 energy efficiency businesses operating across the U.S.

Energy efficiency jobs include positions in manufacturing, such as building ENERGY STAR® appliances, efficient windows and doors and LED lighting systems. They include jobs in construction – retrofitting buildings, offices and schools to make them more efficient. Efficiency careers are found in high-tech design and software and professional services, as well as at the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) companies that upgrade outdated inefficient HVAC systems, boilers, ductwork and other equipment.

Energy efficiency jobs aren’t limited by geography, geology or political persuasion. There are workers in energy efficiency in every state and in virtually every U.S. county, the report shows. More than 317,000 energy efficiency jobs are located in rural areas, while 928,000 jobs are found in the nation’s top 25 metro areas. In 41 states and the District of Columbia, more Americans now work in energy efficiency than fossil fuels.

Other key findings:

• 10% of energy efficiency jobs are held by veterans — nearly double the national average of 6%.
• Construction and manufacturing make up more than 70% of U.S. energy efficiency jobs.
• More than one out of every six U.S. construction workers spend 50% or more of their time on energy efficiency (1.3 million workers).
• 321,000 energy efficiency jobs are in manufacturing.
• More than 1.1 million energy efficiency jobs are in heating, ventilation, and cooling technologies.
• Efficient lighting technologies employ 370,000 workers.
• ENERGY STAR appliances employ 167,000 workers.
• Energy efficiency employers are projecting 7.8% job growth in 2019
• Small businesses are driving America’s energy efficiency job boom, with 79% of energy efficiency businesses employing fewer than 20 workers.
• 17 states employ more than 50,000 workers, and 40 states are home to at least 10,000 energy efficiency workers.

Source: E2 (Environmental Entrepreneurs)

Parque eólico El Andévalo (Huelva) / El Andévalo wind farm (Huelva)

Iberdrola and Heineken España have added to their commitment to sustainability as a strategic thrust in their businesses with the first long-term Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) in Spain between an electricity supplier and a brewing group. The agreement reached by the two companies will promote the construction of a new photovoltaic plant in Andévalo, which will guarantee the supply of green electricity to the four breweries and offices of Heineken España. The plant will become operational in 2020, in PPA mode, avoiding the mission into the atmosphere of over 100,000 tonnes of CO2 a year.

Andévalo forms part of Iberdrola’s strategy of investing in clean power generation projects in Spain – where it plans to install 3,000 MW by 2022- and its commitment to using bilateral agreements with big customers who are committed to sustainable consumption as a way to promote the supply of energy at affordable, stable prices.

Through this partnership Heineken España will be able to brew its beer using only renewable energies by 2023. To achieve this, Heineken is implementing an ambitious road map which, among other initiatives, encompasses a 100% renewable electricity supply.

Located in the municipality of Puebla de Guzmán (Huelva) and with a surface area of 150 ha., the project will have an installed capacity of 50 MW and will consist of 147,000, 340 Wp polycrystalline silicon modules that will generate 82 GWh/yr. The plant will be built inside the biggest wind farm in continental Europe, El Andévalo (292 MW), developed and managed by Iberdrola since 2010.

In addition to its environmental impact, the new solar photovoltaic installation will contribute to reactivating employment in the local community

Iberdrola’s plan to relaunch clean energy in Spain

The Andévalo photovoltaic project forms part of the company’s commitment to strengthening its investment in the production of clean energy in Spain, by installing 3,000 new MW by 2022. By 2030, company forecasts point to the installation of 10,000 new megawatts (MW). The plan will create jobs for 20,000 people.

Iberdrola’s commitment is to lead the transition toward a completely carbon-free economy by promoting renewable energies and accelerating investment in Spain, where it intends to spend 8 billion euros between 2018 and 2022.

Iberdrola is the most prolific producer of wind energy in Spain, with installed power of 5,770 MW, while its total installed renewable capacity, including both wind and hydroelectric, is 15,828 MW. The company operates 883 MW in Andalusia, mainly using wind power. Globally, Iberdrola’s installed renewable capacity is over 30,300 MW, which makes its generation fleet one of the cleanest in the energy sector.

Iberdrola is a global reference point in the area of PPAs and has long-term power purchase agreements (PPAs) in markets that include Spain, United States and Mexico, with wind and photovoltaic power projects totalling over 1,500 MW. In Spain, the company has been a pioneer in promoting this type of agreement with companies from various sectors (banking, telecommunications, distribution and sports brands).

Beer brewed 100% using renewable energy: the commitment from Heineken España

After covering all the demand for electricity from its breweries in Spain with the development of this new solar photovoltaic installation, Heineken’s plan focuses on replacing its current gas boilers with others that use solar energy in order to bring about its commitment to making its beers using only renewable energy by 2023.

These measures form part of its sustainability strategy Brewing a Better World, which focuses on six priority areas in which the company considers that its activities can make the most positive impact. Among them is the fight against climate change by reducing the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere, a commitment on which Heineken España has made great progress in recent years by reducing its carbon footprint by 64% since 2008. In 2018, the company succeeded in meeting the 2020 goals two years ahead of schedule, setting new challenges for 2030 in the areas of production, cooling and packaging in order to meet the commitments of the Paris climate conference (COP 21) and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG), among which is the commitment to using only renewable energy for the entire production of its beers by 2023.

Source: Iberdrola

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Inerco Ingeniería, Tecnología y Consultoría enters a Strategic Business Alliance Agreement with the energy storage company SaltX Technology – listed on Nasdaq First North Premier –. The partners enter a joint development plan where the first step is to build a pre-commercial pilot in Megawatt scale during 2020.

Inerco has a strong reputation within thermal power generation engineering and technology. The Energy Storage system to be designed will be charged using a non-dispatchable renewable energy or high temperature waste heat. This system will also allow a controlled discharge in periods of high energy demand, as decarbonised high temperature heat (producing steam for electricity generation or heat for direct industrial use).

The goal is to lower the dependency on fossil fuels and increase the flexibility of thermal and renewable power plants. The partners have also agreed to a road map for commercialising the solution. The target markets for the alliance will initially be Spain, Portugal, Central and South America and Mexico. INERCO will be responsible for the development of the first pilot and will also lead the funding of it.

“Inerco finds relevant advantages in nanocoated salts for thermochemical energy storage, which have led us to establish a strong partnership with SaltX. The future of the energy sector undoubtedly implies the use of robust and cost-effective energy storage solutions to be integrated with hybridised conventional and renewable energy sources. SaltX´s nanocoated salts present intrinsic advantages with respect to systems based on other energy storage principles, such as those using molten salts, concrete, or electric batteries, due to their improved energy efficiency, management and safety characteristics. With this technological approach INERCO is convinced about finding competitive solutions for the new decarbonised energy scenario related to both power generation and energy intensive industries”, says Pedro Marín, CEO of Inerco.

Source: Inerco

Portada-Sep_Curtis-Texeiro_-FuturEnergy_Julio19

The Curtis-Teixeiro biomass plant is one the most important renewable energy projects in Europe. Greenalia will invest €135 million in the plant and the construction work is being carried out by a joint venture made up of Acciona Industrial and Imasa Ingeniería y Proyectos. Under the terms of the EPC contract, the consortium will be responsible for the O&M of the plant over a period of 15 years. The Curtis Teixeiro biomass plant is being built on a 103,000 m2 site and will have a capacity of 50 MW when fully operational, enough energy to supply a population of over 250,000. Once completed, this pioneer in terms of technological innovation will be the largest forest biomass facility in the Iberian Peninsula and Southern Europe, using pruning and eucalyptus wood waste.

Once commissioned, the plant will generate 324 GWh per annum and will have the capacity to treat 500,000 tonnes of forest biomass. This waste will be supplied by group subsidiary Greenalia Forest, which will collect it from FSC or PEFC certified forests within a radius of 100 km from the plant.

The plant features the latest biomass power generation technologies and complies with the most stringent European legislation. This is a highly efficient power generation facility, with low CO2 emissions. It uses dry cooling technology, which means minimal water consumption and no effluent discharges. Construction work is scheduled for completion in September and the plant is expected to come online in the first quarter of 2020.

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