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Portada-Sep_Curtis-Texeiro_-FuturEnergy_Julio19

The Curtis-Teixeiro biomass plant is one the most important renewable energy projects in Europe. Greenalia will invest €135 million in the plant and the construction work is being carried out by a joint venture made up of Acciona Industrial and Imasa Ingeniería y Proyectos. Under the terms of the EPC contract, the consortium will be responsible for the O&M of the plant over a period of 15 years. The Curtis Teixeiro biomass plant is being built on a 103,000 m2 site and will have a capacity of 50 MW when fully operational, enough energy to supply a population of over 250,000. Once completed, this pioneer in terms of technological innovation will be the largest forest biomass facility in the Iberian Peninsula and Southern Europe, using pruning and eucalyptus wood waste.

Once commissioned, the plant will generate 324 GWh per annum and will have the capacity to treat 500,000 tonnes of forest biomass. This waste will be supplied by group subsidiary Greenalia Forest, which will collect it from FSC or PEFC certified forests within a radius of 100 km from the plant.

The plant features the latest biomass power generation technologies and complies with the most stringent European legislation. This is a highly efficient power generation facility, with low CO2 emissions. It uses dry cooling technology, which means minimal water consumption and no effluent discharges. Construction work is scheduled for completion in September and the plant is expected to come online in the first quarter of 2020.

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Foundation of a wind turbine

GES, an integral supplier of engineering, construction and maintenance for renewable energy projects (wind, solar and hydroelectric) will build the Valdejalón wind portfolio consisting of 5 wind farms in Aragón, Spain. Once completed, the wind farms will have a total installed capacity of 231 MW. Construction is expected to be finalized in 2020 second quarter.

The project is divided into two phases: Valdejalón East which includes the wind farms El Cabezo (49 MW) and Portillo II Phase I (45.6 MW) and Phase II (38 MW), and Valdejalón West composed of Virgen de Rodanas I (49.4 MW) and Virgen de Rodanas II (49.4 MW).

The Valdejalón portfolio is fully owned by the Danish fund manager Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners P/S (CIP) through its fund Copenhagen Infrastructure III K/S (CI-III). CIP is a fund management company focused on energy infrastructure including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar PV, biomass and energy-from-waste, transmission and distribution, and other energy assets like reserve capacity and storage. The company operates in Europe, North America and Southeast Asia.

GES is responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction of the project. The company is already working in the detail engineering, and will be in charge of the complete BOP (Balance of Plant), both the civil work, with more than 60 km of roads and 61 foundations and platforms for the 85 m wind turbines to be installed in the park; and the electrical work, including the underground medium voltage network with more than 55 km of trenches and the 132 kV evacuation line of almost another 50 km, which will connect the two new substations to an existing interconnection substation.

Offshore wind East Anglia One

Iberdrola has hooked up the East Anglia One offshore wind farm to the British electricity grid. It is building the facilities in the North Sea, around 50 km from the coast of the county of Suffolk, in the United Kingdom, and it is scheduled to go into operation next year.

The first of 102 wind turbines, the so-called WTG E19, has already supplied clean power to the land substation in Burstall. Its subsidiary, ScottishPower Renewables, which installed 25 turbines on the site this summer, will gradually connect them to the grid.

With an investment of approximately 2.5 MM£ and covering an area of 300 km2, East Anglia One is one of the largest scale projects being developed by Iberdrola and the biggest renewable initiative ever developed by a Spanish company.

Once commissioned in 2020, it will be the world’s biggest wind farm, with an installed capacity of 714 MW that will supply 630,000 British homes with clean energy.

The construction of East Anglia One is driving the offshore power industry in Europe, providing jobs for more than 1,300 people in several countries – Spain, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the United Arab Emirates – and is crucial to several sectors, such as the naval industry. The project has been a great driving force in Spain, since Iberdrola has used local companies like Navantia, Windar and Siemens-Gamesa for the development of many of the essential components of the wind farm.

Technical specifications ofeast anglia one

  • 102 Siemens Gamesa wind turbines make up the wind farm, each with a capacity of 7 MW. Once installed, they will have a total height of 167 m.
  • A marine substation (Andalusia II), manufactured by Navantia in Puerto Real (Cádiz), will be responsible for receiving the electricity produced by the wind turbines and transforming the voltage so it can be sent to the coast through two undersea cables, each around 85 km long.
  • These cables are joined to a further six underground cables measuring around 37 km and running from Bawdsey to the new land-based transformer in Burstall, which connects the offshore wind farm to the national grid.
  • Of the 102 jacket-type foundations, Navantia has manufactured 42 in Fene (Spain) and Windar has built the pilot cables in Avilés (Asturias). The other 60 foundations were manufactured by Lamprell in the United Arab Emirates and by Harland & Wolff in Belfast.

 

Iberdrola, steadfast commitment to offshore wind power

Over the next few years, Iberdrola will redouble its investment in offshore wind production, developing a project portfolio with over 10,000 MW. This growth focuses on three main areas: the North Sea, the Baltic Sea and the United States.

Clean power generated by offshore wind farms are the cornerstone of the company’s strategy, which expects to allocate 39% of the 34 MM€ earmarked for the 2018-2022 period to this type of generation: 13.26 MM€.

The group is currently operating two offshore wind farms: West of Duddon Sands, which went into service in the North Sea in 2014, and Wikinger, in the German waters of the Baltic Sea, which has been operational since December 2017.

In the United States, Iberdrola is in the process of building the biggest offshore wind farm in that country: Vineyard Wind. Just off the coast of Massachusetts, it will produce 800 MW of power to cover the energy needs of a million homes.

In Germany, in April 2018, the company was awarded contracts to build two new plants in the Baltic Sea, with a total of 486 MW of power: Baltic Eagle and Wikinger South.

In addition to these new plants, the Sant Brieuc Wind Farm, which is located in French waters, is scheduled to be commissioned in 2022. It will have 496 MW of installed power and will be located just off the coast of French Brittany, 20 km offshore.

Once these projects are operating in late 2022, the company will have installed 2,000 MW of offshore wind power, after which it will add a further 1,000.

Iberdrola is seizing this excellent opportunity for growth, with ambitious objectives for new wind generation facilities in the United Kingdom and the United States for the next few years: 30,000 MW for 2030 in the former and 25,000 MW in the latter, each with different timelines.

Solarpack Corporación Tecnológica, SA (the “Company” or “Solarpack”) announces the closing of the acquisition of 90.5% of the solar photovoltaic (” FV “) projects Tacna Solar and Panamericana Solar (the “Projects”) with TAWA SOLAR FUND LP and the rest of the Projects’ shareholders, for US$ 51.5 million. With this milestone, the Company has become the owner of 100% of the Projects, since prior to the transaction it had 9.5% of the shares of the special purpose vehicles (“SPVs”) owning the assets: Tacna Solar SAC and Panamericana Solar SAC.

The Projects, which were developed and built by Solarpack in 2012 in association with Gestamp Asetym Solar (now X-ELIO), are located in southern Peru and have a total combined installed capacity of 43 MW. Both Projects have a long-term power purchase agreement (“PPA”) in US$ in place with the Peruvian Ministry of Energy, as a result of the first renewable energy resources (“RER”) tender held in Peru in 2010, and have more than 13 years of remaining contractual life under their respective PPAs.

The Projects have a long-term non-recourse project financing granted by Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), had a net financial debt of 113 MM$ as of February 28, 2019 and booked a joint EBITDA (Pro forma EBITDA 2018 considered the acquisition of the c. 13 MW in Spain as if it had happened on January 1, 2018, and was 25.2 MM€) of 21 MM$ in 2018.

In order to partly finance the acquisition of the Projects, Solarpack has disbursed a bridge loan granted by Banco Santander for 30 MM$. For the amortization of the bridge loan, the Company contemplates several options that may involve the entry of a minority partner in the Projects or, alternatively, maintaining full ownership of the assets.

The transaction is part of Solarpack’s strategy to selectively acquire operating assets that offer attractive returns and clear value creation opportunities from operational or other types of synergies. With this acquisition, the Company accelerates the original growth plan with which it went public in December 2018.

Installed capacity of renewable power in Colombia is expected to rise from 2% in 2018 to 14% in 2025, with a further rise to 21% by 2030. Renewable capacity in the country is slated to increase fivefold to reach 5.9 GW at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 24.4%. This growth can be attributed to new government policies facilitating funds for renewable energy projects, energy efficiency measures and announcement of renewable energy auctions in 2018, says GlobalData.

However, GlobalData’s latest report, “Colombia Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2019 – Market Trends, Regulations and Competitive Landscape, also reveals that the country’s coal-based capacity will increase by 43% between 2018 and 2030 to reach 2.4GW while gas-based power will contribute 14% of total capacity.

Renewable energy and energy efficiency projects will handle the demand side management in the near future. The country’s onshore wind capacity is expected to increase from 19.5 MW in 2018 to 3.4 GW in 2030, representing the country’s largest growth among its renewable sources. PV capacity is expected to reach 1.7 GW in 2030 from 172.6 MW in 2019 at 23% CAGR, while the biopower segment will see growth of 7% CAGR to reach 719 MW. To date, Colombia does not have any installed geothermal capacity but it is expected to have 50 MW installed by 2024, leading to 115 MW capacity in 2030 growing at 15% CAGR.”

Colombia’s Generation and Transmission Expansion Plan 2015-2029 is expected to accommodate high volumes of renewable energy in the near future. The anticipated grid expansion and modernization of 4.2GW to 6.7GW, which is aimed to support 1GW coal and 1.5 GW hydro, will involve huge investment in grid infrastructure industry. This, in turn, is likely to open up new markets for energy storage and energy efficiency systems to enable steady supply of power when adequate renewable energy is unavailable.

Jinko Solar has been one of only four PV module suppliers to receive a “AA” bankability rating from PV-Tech & Solar Media. Jinko Solar is the only PV module supplier to have AA-Ratings for the past 12 consecutive quarters.

In its first ever quarterly PV ModuleTech Bankability Ratings, PV Tech set out to create an independent, comprehensive and transparent ranking system to help investors, banks, project developers and EPCs differentiate between the hundreds of PV module suppliers that sell to commercial, industrial, and utility customers around the world.

Mr. Kangping Chen, CEO of JinkoSolar, commented, “We are extremely pleased to be recognized by such a reputable and independent organization as PV Tech. 2019 is already shaping up to be one of the top five warmest years on record. As the need for cleaner alternative energy solutions becomes ever more important, and as our industry continues to grow, it is becoming increasingly difficult for customers to distinguish between supplier claims. While we have always been focused on pushing through technological innovations and producing the highest quality modules in the market, we have also deliberately tried to balance profitability and the long-term sustainability of our business.”

Source: Jinko Solar

Wind technology contracts activity in July 2019 saw 53 contracts announced, marking a drop of 32% over the last 12-month average of 78, according to GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Onshore was the top category in wind technology in terms of number of contracts for the month, accounting for 35 contracts and a 66% share, followed by Offshore with 17 contracts and a 32.1% share. Onshore Repowered stood in third place with one contract and a 1.9% share.

Looking at global power contracts activity divided by the type of technology, wind held the second position in terms of number of contracts during July 2019 with a 29% share.

The proportion of contracts by category in the Wind technology tracked by GlobalData in the month was as follows:

  • Supply & Erection: 21 contracts and a 39.6% share
  • Project Implementation: 19 contracts and a 35.8% share
  • Power Purchase Agreement: ten contracts and an 18.9% share
  • Repair, Maintenance, Upgrade & Others: one contract and a 1.9% share
  • Consulting & Similar Services: one contract and a 1.9% share
  • Electricity Supply: one contract and a 1.9% share

 

Europe leads wind contracts activity in July 2019
Comparing contracts activity in wind technology in different regions of the globe, Europe held the top position with 24 contracts and a share of 45.3% during July 2019, followed by North America with 14 contracts and a 26.4% share and Asia-Pacific with eight contracts and a 15.1% share.

In fourth place was South and Central America with four contracts and a 7.5% share and in fifth place was Middle East and Africa with three contracts and a 5.7% share.

Wind technology contracts in July 2019: Top companies by capacity
The top issuers of contracts in Wind technology for the month in terms of power capacity involved were:

  • EDF Renewables North America (United States): 514MW from two contracts
  • Plambeck Emirates: 500MW from one contract
  • EDF Renewables (United States) and Abu Dhabi Future Energy (United Arab Emirates): 415.8MW capacity from one contract

Wind technology contracts in July 2019: Top winners by capacity
The top winners of contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved were:

  • Infrastructure and Energy Alternatives (United States): 514MW from two contracts
  • Saipem (Italy): 500MW from one contract
  • Vestas Mediterranean (Spain): 415.8MW capacity from one contract

Source: GlobalData

Africa’s first 100% solar-powered desalination plant has produced 10 ML of fresh drinking water—with help from Danfoss APP pumps and iSave energy-recovery technology.

Developed by Mascara Renewable Water and Turnkey Water Solutions, the OSMOSUN® unit at Witsand—in South Africa’s Southern Cape—is powered solely by photovoltaics (PVs) producing 73kWh/day.

Taking water from the sea, the plant provides people in the historically drought-prone region with up to 100,000 L of safe, drinkable water per day.

The seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) conversion process uses a highly efficient Danfoss APP pump to force water through a desalination membrane under high pressure. The water’s kinetic energy then drives the iSave 21 Plus energy recovery device.

Specifically developed for SWRO applications, the Danfoss iSave 21 Plus recovers kinetic energy that would otherwise be lost and returns it to the plant. The APP pump’s simple construction also makes it compact—with very little maintenance required—ideal for remote sites. What’s more, it’s oil free, so the risk of unplanned downtime is significantly reduced and there’s zero potential for water contamination.

Mascara’s OSMOSUN® system is already proven in other parts of the world (we have a more detailed story about its PV-powered SWRO plant in Abu Dhabi). At full capacity, it can produce approximately 300,000 L/day, using 400 m2 of PV panels.

Source: Danfoss

Rolls-Royce continues its expansion into the Latin America market through the supply of MTU Onsite Energy generator sets for the power plant of a new pork processing facility in Mexico. It is operated by one of the country’s largest and most technically advanced producers. The power plant is supported by four MTU Onsite Energy Series 4000 gas generators and one MTU Onsite Energy diesel generator under one overall control system. The site is not connected to the grid; therefore, the power solution is completely independent. This is the first off-grid solution of its kind in the Americas for MTU.

Local distributed energy systems expert, Electriz, S.A. de C.V., was awarded the business, leading engineering, procurement and construction for the project, as well as operation and ongoing maintenance of the power plant. Electriz’s ability to customize and deliver highly-efficient systems was a success factor to win the project.

The four gas units are 20-cylinder Series 4000 natural gas systems delivering all together 7.7 MW electrical power, capable of handling the pork processing facility’s altitude of 8,000 feet above sea level with the lowest derating, ensuring maximum power availability at the site. In a second phase, it is planned to use the heat out of the exhaust gas, the oil cooler and the mixture cooler to produce steam and hot water which can be used in the production processes.

A single 16-cylinder Series 4000 diesel generator system with an electrical output of 2 MW is tasked with absorbing greater load blocks than the natural gas units, offering long-term stability to the power plant. The diesel unit will run continuously with loads as low as 10 percent to minimize fuel consumption, allowing the natural gas units to produce more energy. MTU Onsite Energy’s MCS master control panel integrates plant control and remote operation, and all systems run in isolation from the power grid, providing reliable, stable and efficient electrical power to the entire facility.

The pork processing facility, located in Puebla, Mexico, features a power plant that will operate using three different fuel sources, including biogas from livestock waste in a later stage. With the help of the flexible MTU Onsite Energy systems, the plant will have the ability to double its power capacity in the future. The customer already owns and operates a combined heat and power (CHP) plant at a nearby facility using a medium-speed gas generator unit from Rolls-Royce.

Source: Rolls-Royce

Aracati Park

The overall renewable power capacity in Brazil is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6% from 31 GW in 2018 to 60.8GW in 2030, according to GlobalData.

GlobalData’s latest report: “Brazil Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2019 – Market Trends, Regulations, and Competitive Landscape” reveals that increased renewable energy auctions, promotion of hybrid renewable energy projects and other government initiatives such as tax incentives, smart metering, renewable energy targets and favorable grid access policies for renewable energy are likely to result in renewable expansion by 2030.

Between 2019 and 2030, solar PV and onshore wind segments are expected to grow at CAGRs of 14% and 6%, respectively. The significant rise in these two technologies will result in renewable energy being the second largest contributor to the country’s energy mix by 2030.

The connection of over 25,000 power systems, mostly solar PV systems to the Brazilian grid in mid-2018 under the net metering scheme, further underpins the renewable growth pattern over the forecast period.

The main challenges for Brazil’s power sector are its overdependence on cheap hydropower for base-load capacity and lack of a robust power grid infrastructure. In 2018, hydropower accounted for 62.7% of the country’s total installed capacity. In case of a drought, depletion of dam reservoirs could result in power shortages and switching over to costly thermal power which will increase the electricity prices.

In the long term, hydropower capacity is expected to decline and be compensated with increased renewable power capacity. On the other hand, thermal and renewable capacities are slated to increase and contribute 28% and 18%, respectively of the installed capacity in 2030.

Brazil is moving towards a balanced energy mix as it prepares to double its non-hydro renewable power capacity by 2030. With an almost 10GW increase in thermal power capacity by 2030 compared to 2018, the country is on course to better manage peak demand, reduce dependence on hydropower and maintain a healthy grid.

Source: Globaldata

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