Tags Posts tagged with "Europe"

Europe

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The RE-Source Platform has launched a comprehensive new toolkit, offering guidance and advice on corporate sourcing of renewable energy. The toolkit has a dual purpose: first, to raise awareness and inform entrant corporates and policymakers to the opportunities in sourcing renewable energy; second, to facilitate business transactions between buyers and sellers, making them faster, easier, and cheaper.

 

The Renewable Energy Buyer’s Toolkit includes an ‘Introduction to Corporate Sourcing in Europe’ report, that outlines the main business models of corporate renewable sourcing in Europe, and is intended for corporate energy buyers who are new to corporate sourcing and the European market to use as an introductory ‘how-to’ guide, helping them to start their journey in renewable electricity purchasing. The toolkit also includes:

  • European Federation of Energy Traders (EFET) Template corporate PPA: A standardised contract to provide guidance and simplify transactions.
  • European Corporate Sourcing Directory: Information on possible models of corporate sourcing in particular countries.
  • PPA training courses for corporate buyers: How to value and compare corporate PPAs.

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Europe has set a target that 32% of its energy should come from renewables by 2030, up from 17.5% today. Corporates are and can play an even bigger role in meeting this target. Thousands of key corporate buyers – including from the steel, aluminium, ICT, and chemicals industries – and clean energy suppliers, are meeting in Amsterdam at the RE-Source 2019 event – for a two-day conference to discuss how to accelerate efforts to source more renewable energy.

The last weeks have seen an abundance of significant solar and wind sourcing agreements from major corporates around the world. Google announced its largest corporate renewable purchase in history, including nearly 800 MW of new renewable energy in Europe. Amazon recently unveiled plans to reach 100% renewable energy by 2030.

The Airports Council International (ACI Europe) also announced at the event a new partnership with the RE-Source Platform to accelerate the clean energy transition of the airport industry and help it achieve its 2050 net zero commitment. In addition, the RE-Source Platform received a €500,000 grant from Google.org to fund further the development of new renewable energy purchasing models, provide training and resources for consumers, and enable more widespread access to clean power.

Corporate sourcing of renewables has risen rapidly in Europe, with 7.5 GW of Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) deals signed over the past five years, and 1.6 GW worth of deals in 2019 alone. More European countries are engaging in PPA deals: 13 countries have inked PPAs in 2019 so far. Commercial and industrial on-site corporate sourcing accounted for 3.4 GW in 2018 and is expected to grow considerably in the next decade.

Industrial and commercial consumers account for more than half of Europe’s energy consumption today. Powering these corporate consumers with renewable energy could deliver both significant reductions in CO2 emissions and make European industries more competitive due to the rapidly falling cost of renewables.

According to a recent study from the European Commission, if EU-based corporate buyers committed to sourcing renewable electricity to meet 30% of their total electricity demand by 2030, the EU renewable energy sector would generate more than €750bn in gross added value and over 220,000 new jobs.

Governments can play their part in facilitating more companies to source renewables, by removing administrative hurdles for corporate renewable PPAs, and on-site and direct investments in renewable energy generation that exist throughout Europe. Under the new Renewable Energy Directive, European governments now have the duty to remove these barriers. Currently, only two of the draft National Energy and Climate Plans for 2030 even mention PPAs and none comply with the agreed legislation.

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Foto cortesía de/Photo courtesy of: GWEC

Europe wind technology contracts in Q2 2019 saw 118 contracts announced, marking a rise of 9% over the last four-quarter average of 108, according to GlobalData’s power industry contracts database.

Onshore was the top category in wind technology in terms of number of contracts for the quarter in Europe, accounting for 80 contracts and a 67.8% share, followed by offshore with 34 contracts and a 28.8% share. Onshore repowered stood in third place with four contracts and a 3.4% share.

The proportion of wind technology contracts by category tracked by GlobalData in the quarter was as follows:

1. Project implementation with 41 contracts and a 34.7% share
2. Supply & erection: 35 contracts and a 29.7% share
3. Power Purchase Agreement: 16 contracts and a 13.6% share
4. Repair, maintenance, upgrade & others: 15 contracts and a 12.7% share
5. Consulting & similar services: seven contracts and a 5.9% share
6. Electricity supply: four contracts and a 3.4% share.

France tops Europe wind power contracts activity

France was the top country in the Europe region for wind technology contracts recorded in Q2 2019 with 28 contracts and a 23.7% share, followed by Germany with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share and the UK with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share.

The top issuers of contracts for the quarter in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

1. Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkey (Turkey): 1,000 MW from two contracts
2. Ministere de la transition ecologique et solidaire (France): 600 MW from one contract
3. Ministere de l’Environnement, de l’Energie et de la Mer (France): 516.5 MW capacity from 21 contracts.

The top winners were:

1. EDF Renewables (France), Enbridge (Canada) and Innogy (Germany): 600 MW.
2. Enercon (Germany) and Enerjisa Enerji (Turkey): 500 MW.
3. Aquila Capital Concepts (Germany): 133.2 MW.

Source: GlobalData

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Today, 75% of Europeans live in urban areas and this is expected to rise. Already we are facing an increasing amount of challenges in our cities related to poor air quality, energy poverty, and highly inefficient buildings. The building stock accounts for 49% of Europe’s energy demand and 36% of CO2 emissions at EU level – we need to accelerate the deployment of renewable energy and invest significantly in improving the energy efficiency of our buildings if Europe is to become carbon-neutral.

Against this backdrop, SolarPower Europe has launched the Solar4Buildings campaign –calling for solar on all new and renovated buildings in the EU to help limit climate change.

In the EU, more than 90% of roofs go unused, when they could help mitigate climate change by having solar installed on them. Installing solar on all new buildings and those undergoing renovations makes perfect sense as it could reduce buildings’ CO2 emissions significantly whilst producing clean electricity.

What’s more, Europe’s rooftops have huge solar potential. According to the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre, rooftops in the EU can produce 680 TWh of solar power annually – which is equal to one quarter of the current electricity consumption in the EU.

Solar is one of the most affordable energy sources today. The price of solar panels has dropped by more than 96% since 2000 and is expected to fall even further. By installing solar, European households can also save money on their electricity bills and have access to reliable and clean energy – that makes for a greener future. In Germany, a typical four-person family household with an average annual electricity consumption of 3,600 kWh could save more than €500 each year, if equipped with an average size rooftop system.

Despite these facts, buildings are still regularly being constructed without solar. Now it is time to install solar on all these roofs – on residential, commercial, industrial and public buildings.

SolarPower Europe will present the Solar4Buildings campaign to the new European Commission starting in November and as part of its input to President-elect Ursula von der Leyen’s ‘Green Deal’.

Help support the campaign by signing the petition calling for EU legislation to have solar on all new and renovated buildings in the European Union!

Source: SolarPower Europe

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Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy today held a launch ceremony with local government authorities and wind industry partners in Taiwan for what will be the company’s first offshore nacelle assembly facility outside of Europe. Construction is due to begin in 2020 at the site located in the port of Taichung. This represents an important milestone for the company in the fast-growing Asia-Pacific region. Siemens Gamesa currently has offshore nacelle assembly and manufacturing facilities in Germany and Denmark.

The parcel of land being developed in Taiwan measures over 30,000 square meters, and will be used for nacelle assembly, testing, warehousing, office buildings, and outdoor storage. Siemens Gamesa is also working closely with Taiwan International Ports Corporation (TIPC) to establish inbound and outbound logistics in newly-established quaysides nearby.

Construction is planned to begin in 2020, and production in 2021. The facility will then support Ørsted’s 900 MW Greater Changhua 1 & 2a project, for which the SG 8.0-167 DD turbine will be used. In later years, it will provide an option for the supply of nacelles to other regional projects.

“Thanks to this nacelle assembly facility, we will be creating more opportunities of working with the growing localized supplier network as well as developing a skilled offshore workforce. All these efforts will contribute to building a competitive local supply chain, in line with international standards in terms of safety, costs, quality, and making Taiwan a leading offshore market,” says Niels Steenberg, General Manager of Siemens Gamesa Offshore for Asia-Pacific.

The long-term collaboration between SGRE and TIPC was first officialized in December 2017 via a Memorandum of Understanding. Both parties agreed to cooperate towards developing Taichung harbor for the offshore wind power industry.

In 2016, Siemens Gamesa erected Taiwan’s first two offshore turbines composing the 8 MW Formosa 1 Phase 1 project. The company is currently installing the subsequent phase, the 120 MW Formosa 1 Phase 2 project. This is Taiwan’s first commercial-scale offshore wind power project, and features 20 SWT-6.0-154 wind turbines. Siemens Gamesa has signed contracts in Asia Pacific for close to 2 GW of offshore wind power projects for the years to come, including 1.5 GW of confirmed orders.

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Offshore wind East Anglia One

Iberdrola has hooked up the East Anglia One offshore wind farm to the British electricity grid. It is building the facilities in the North Sea, around 50 km from the coast of the county of Suffolk, in the United Kingdom, and it is scheduled to go into operation next year.

The first of 102 wind turbines, the so-called WTG E19, has already supplied clean power to the land substation in Burstall. Its subsidiary, ScottishPower Renewables, which installed 25 turbines on the site this summer, will gradually connect them to the grid.

With an investment of approximately 2.5 MM£ and covering an area of 300 km2, East Anglia One is one of the largest scale projects being developed by Iberdrola and the biggest renewable initiative ever developed by a Spanish company.

Once commissioned in 2020, it will be the world’s biggest wind farm, with an installed capacity of 714 MW that will supply 630,000 British homes with clean energy.

The construction of East Anglia One is driving the offshore power industry in Europe, providing jobs for more than 1,300 people in several countries – Spain, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the United Arab Emirates – and is crucial to several sectors, such as the naval industry. The project has been a great driving force in Spain, since Iberdrola has used local companies like Navantia, Windar and Siemens-Gamesa for the development of many of the essential components of the wind farm.

Technical specifications ofeast anglia one

  • 102 Siemens Gamesa wind turbines make up the wind farm, each with a capacity of 7 MW. Once installed, they will have a total height of 167 m.
  • A marine substation (Andalusia II), manufactured by Navantia in Puerto Real (Cádiz), will be responsible for receiving the electricity produced by the wind turbines and transforming the voltage so it can be sent to the coast through two undersea cables, each around 85 km long.
  • These cables are joined to a further six underground cables measuring around 37 km and running from Bawdsey to the new land-based transformer in Burstall, which connects the offshore wind farm to the national grid.
  • Of the 102 jacket-type foundations, Navantia has manufactured 42 in Fene (Spain) and Windar has built the pilot cables in Avilés (Asturias). The other 60 foundations were manufactured by Lamprell in the United Arab Emirates and by Harland & Wolff in Belfast.

 

Iberdrola, steadfast commitment to offshore wind power

Over the next few years, Iberdrola will redouble its investment in offshore wind production, developing a project portfolio with over 10,000 MW. This growth focuses on three main areas: the North Sea, the Baltic Sea and the United States.

Clean power generated by offshore wind farms are the cornerstone of the company’s strategy, which expects to allocate 39% of the 34 MM€ earmarked for the 2018-2022 period to this type of generation: 13.26 MM€.

The group is currently operating two offshore wind farms: West of Duddon Sands, which went into service in the North Sea in 2014, and Wikinger, in the German waters of the Baltic Sea, which has been operational since December 2017.

In the United States, Iberdrola is in the process of building the biggest offshore wind farm in that country: Vineyard Wind. Just off the coast of Massachusetts, it will produce 800 MW of power to cover the energy needs of a million homes.

In Germany, in April 2018, the company was awarded contracts to build two new plants in the Baltic Sea, with a total of 486 MW of power: Baltic Eagle and Wikinger South.

In addition to these new plants, the Sant Brieuc Wind Farm, which is located in French waters, is scheduled to be commissioned in 2022. It will have 496 MW of installed power and will be located just off the coast of French Brittany, 20 km offshore.

Once these projects are operating in late 2022, the company will have installed 2,000 MW of offshore wind power, after which it will add a further 1,000.

Iberdrola is seizing this excellent opportunity for growth, with ambitious objectives for new wind generation facilities in the United Kingdom and the United States for the next few years: 30,000 MW for 2030 in the former and 25,000 MW in the latter, each with different timelines.

The European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA), Eurelectric and Transport & Environment (T&E) are calling on the European institutions to facilitate a rapid roll-out of smart charging infrastructure for electric vehicles. This is a unique collaboration as it marks the first time that the EU auto industry, electricity sector and the green group have joined forces to push for a common goal.

E-mobility has a crucial role to play in decarbonising road transport and meeting Europe’s climate objective. As Brussels gears up for a new political term, the three associations are therefore urging policy makers to guarantee the ‘right to plug’ to all those who use an electric vehicle, so that everyone across Europe can get access to charging which should be as simple as refuelling today.

This will require a massive deployment of strategically located ‘smart charging’ infrastructure right across the EU. Smart infrastructure will enable drivers to charge without severely affecting, or overloading, Europe’s electricity grids. It provides clear benefits to customers, the power system, the automobile industry and society at large, the associations believe.

ACEA, Eurelectric and T&E signed this joint call to action today at ACEA’s ‘Leading the mobility transformation’ Summit in Brussels. On this occasion, the auto and electricity industries confirmed their commitment to making more focused investments in both vehicle technology and smart charging solutions.

Whether it is urban or motorway public charging, all barriers to infrastructure deployment and e-mobility growth must be removed. In order to make charging at home, work and on motorways easy and accessible for all drivers, policy makers should reform and strengthen key legislation, such as the soon to be revised EU alternative fuels law (AFID) and the EU buildings directive (EPBD). Existing EU funding instruments must also be better leveraged to speed up the roll-out of infrastructure, and other financial instruments should be targeted to unlock new solutions to improve coverage across all member states.

“The EU auto industry wants to work with all stakeholders to make zero-emission mobility a reality,” stated ACEA Secretary General, Erik Jonnaert. “To convince more customers to make the switch to electric vehicles, we have to remove the stress associated with recharging. This means that everyone must have the option to recharge their vehicle easily, no matter where they live or where they want to travel to.”

“The race to the future is on. We must remove all barriers and make the shift to electric mobility as easy and convenient as possible. Every consumer should have a ‘right-to-plug’ – and the roll-out of public charging points must accelerate. By 2025, we need 1.2 million public charging points in Europe,” said Kristian Ruby, Secretary General of Eurelectric.

Julia Poliscanova, Clean Vehicles Director at T&E said: “A rapid shift to electric cars powered by clean electricity is essential if we want to halt dangerous global warming. Now that carmakers are preparing a wave of new and affordable electric models, we need to ensure the fast and easy deployment of charging points at home, at work and on the road so that charging an electric car becomes a completely hassle free experience for citizens across the EU.”

Source: ACEA

Cumulative offshore wind capacity [GW] worldwide 2010-2019

The worldwide expansion of offshore wind energy, especially in Europe, but also in markets as Asia and North America, causes a further strong increase of global offshore wind capacity. Thus, in Germany, which strongly expanded its capacities within the last years, the electricity generation through offshore wind energy could be increased again: the growth rate in the German North Sea amounted to 16 % and in the German Baltic Sea even to 145 % in the first half of 2019. This is the conclusion reached by the trend and market research institute wind:research in its Half Year Report 2019 The Global Market For Offshore Wind Energy in cooperation with the World Forum Offshore Wind.

The positive development of offshore wind energy is continuing worldwide: while in 2010 the global offshore wind capacity summed up to 3 GW, it increased to 23.3 GW in 2018 and is expected to rise by an additional 27% in 2019 in comparison to the previous year. A look at the planned offshore wind energy projects shows that the positive market development will probably not change in the near future: as of the first half of 2019, the officially planned projects will lead to an overall increase in the worldwide capacity of approximately 46 GW till 2030, a growth of more than 180 %.

The majority of these planned projects is located with almost 36 GW in Europe, a further 6 GW in North America and at least 4 GW in Asia. In Europe, especially striking are the targets of Great Britain, that aim for an increase of its offshore wind capacity by more than 30 GW in 2030, which amounts to a tripling of its current capacity. Germany with its expansion target of 15 GW, the Netherlands with 11.5 GW and France with 10.4 GW fall way behind these ambitious targets. At the same time, outside Europe and especially in Asia the offshore wind energy becomes increasingly popular: thus in Asia the offshore wind capacity summed up to almost 5 GW in the first half of 2019 while in the countries China, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam further 3.9 GW are under construction or in planning.

Meanwhile, the importance of supporting political frameworks becomes visible in Germany. The political standstill of the last years regarding offshore wind energy has led to a decrease of investments and workload culminating in insolvencies and market exits of small as well as large market participants. However, technological improvements, such as higher turbine outputs, floating foundations or the use of hydrogen, political measures, such as CO2 pricing, as well as the rising demand for (green) energy for sector coupling, such as electromobility, overall still provide positive market conditions.

Source: Wind:research

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There were 34 power plant contracts announced in Europe in July 2019, marking a drop of 32% over the last 12-month average of 50, according to GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Power Plant stood at first place when compared with other power tender categories in Europe in July 2019 with 34 contracts and a 45.3% share, followed by Generation Equipment with 17 contracts and a 22.7% share and T&D Equipment with eight contracts and a 10.7% share during the month.

The proportion of contracts by category tracked by GlobalData in the month was as follows:

  • Project Implementation: 31 contracts and a 91.2% share.
  • Consulting & Similar Services: two contracts and a 5.9% share.
  • Repair, Maintenance, Upgrade & Others: one contract and a 2.9% share.

Solar is top technology for Europe power plant contracts in July 2019

Looking at power plant contracts by the type of technology in Europe, solar accounted for 19 contracts with a 55.9% share, followed by wind with 11 contracts and a 32.4% share and thermal with two contracts and a 5.9% share.

Europe power plant contracts in July 2019: Top companies by capacity

The top issuers of power plant contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

  • The Regulatory Authority for Energy (Greece): 322.44MW from 27 contracts.
  • Volkswagen Kraftwerk (Germany): 288MW from one contract.
  • TEAG Thuringer Energie: 63MW capacity from one contract.

Europe power plant contracts in July 2019: Top winners by capacity

The top winners of contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

  • Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Europe (Germany): 288MW from one contract.
  • Spes Solaris (Greece): 75.58MW from seven contracts.
  • MAN Energy Solutions (Germany): 63MW capacity from one contract.

Source: GlobalData

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Asia-Pacific (APAC) is expected to lead the wind turbine market with an annual installation capacity of 33.14 GW by 2023, largely driven by onshore deployment; followed by EMEA and Americas with capacities of 19.9GW and 11.7GW, respectively, according to GlobalData.

The company’s latest report ‘Wind Turbine, Update 2019 – Global Market Size, Competitive Landscape and Key Country Analysis to 2023’ reveals that the buoyancy in the market is largely due to the global investment trends in renewable energy to address power sector challenges.

In the forecast period (2019–2023), wind turbine installations are expected to reach an aggregate of 312.39GW. APAC will continue to lead the market, with an aggregate of 157.61GW of installed capacity, followed by EMEA and Americas with 88.41 GW and 66.36 GW, respectively.

The APAC region led the onshore wind turbine market by registering an aggregate capacity of 138.20GW between 2014 and 2018, and will continue to do so in the future. The need to improve access to electricity, increasing consumption trends and strong industrial market are primary driving factors for onshore wind turbines market.

The growth in the APAC region is largely contributed by China, which has established comprehensive development plans focused on using renewable energy to sustain its growth and ambitions of becoming a global leader in wind technology development.

In the offshore market, EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa) dominated the market and will continue to do so reaching 4.77GW in 2023. EMEA’s dominance is largely driven by the European market. The strong technology base in Europe, favorable wind conditions and increasing effectiveness of offshore wind turbines have contributed to the large scale deployment of offshore wind technology to capitalize on the significantly larger resource.

Source: GlobalData

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