Tags Posts tagged with "hydrogen"

hydrogen

Renault extends the use of its electric light commercial vehicles with hydrogen. Tested since 2014, Groupe Renault’s hydrogen technology was developed in partnership with Symbio, a Groupe Michelin subsidiary. The vehicles are equipped with a range extender fuel cell providing electric and thermal power of 10 kW, increasing the range of Renault MASTER Z.E. Hydrogen and Renault KANGOO Z.E. Hydrogen to over 350 km. Another advantage of hydrogen is that charging takes just five to ten minutes. Hydrogen responds to the requirements of professionals not yet to be fulfilled by electric vehicles, notably for their long-distance travel needs.

Expected in first-half 2020, Renault MASTER Z.E. Hydrogen will triple the range from 120 km to 350* km and will be available in van (two versions) and chassis cab (two versions). Equipped with two hydrogen tanks located under the car body, the vehicle will gain in versatility with no compromises on the load volume from 10,8 m3 to 20 m3 with a reasonable additional weight of 200 kg.

From the end of 2019, Renault KANGOO Z.E. Hydrogen will boast the best real-life range of any electric van on the market at 370* km (vs 230 km WLTP with Kangoo Z.E.), with a load volume of 3.9 m3, despite a reasonable additional weight of 110 kg.

These hydrogen electric vehicles operate with a fuel cell, which combines hydrogen from its tanks with oxygen from the air to produce electricity (to power the electric motor). The first advantage: these vehicles meet the new environmental challenges of urban mobility. In addition, they offer increased autonomy, fast hydrogen recharging (from 5 to 10 minutes) and easy maintenance. These advantages make hydrogen electric light commercial vehicles particularly suitable for the intensive needs and uses of professionals in large urban areas up to the periphery of cities: transport and logistics, urban deliveries and multi-technical services, municipal and local authority services, express and special mail.

* WLTP certification under way

0 8

At the Hydrogen for Climate Conference, EU companies Hydrogenics (BE), Meyer Burger (DE), Ecosolifer (HU), and European Energy (DK) presented their joint proposal for the European Union’s Important Projects of Common European Interest (IPCEI).

The project proposal entitled ‘Silver Frog’ foresees the construction of a cutting-edge 2 GW/year solar PV manufacturing facility. This factory would provide over 10 GW of installed PV capacity, also including wind, for the production of 100% renewable hydrogen, transported by gas pipelines to hard-to-decarbonise industries, such as steel and chemicals. Over a period of eight years, the project is estimated to produce 800,000 tonnes of renewable hydrogen, and reduce 8 million tonnes of CO2 emissions, each year – approximately the CO2 footprint of the whole city of Brussels. At least 6,000 jobs are expected to be created as a result of the project.

In the proposal, Belgium’s Hydrogenics Europe would supply the water electrolysis technology, Germany’s Meyer Burger would supply the solar PV manufacturing line, Hungary’s Ecosolifer would produce the modules and focus on heterojunction technology (HJT), while Denmark’s European Energy would act as the energy developer. SolarPower Europe would offer support to its members throughout the project.

Walburga Hemetsberger, CEO of SolarPower Europe said: “Solar is crucial in delivering fully renewable electricity throughout Europe. The ‘Silver Frog’ project reveals how solar can facilitate the development of renewable hydrogen. Further, this project’s emphasis on the integration of PV manufacturing facilities sends a strong signal to the European Commission that any discussions surrounding renewable hydrogen will require a robust renewable industrial strategy.

Thomas Hengst, Head of Global Sales at Meyer Burger commented: “The ‘Silver Frog’ project has the aim of helping to deliver the EU’s Green Deal, with a focus on hard-to-decarbonise sectors. The crucial element of our project is to develop a new European manufacturing capacity for solar PV cells and modules. The new technology has been developed in Europe and has the potential to establish sustainable and globally-competitive solar cell and module production thanks to its very high efficiency. By focusing on the production and transportation of renewable hydrogen, we can address existing and future demand, as well as offering the concept as an integrated solution.

The notion of Important Projects of Common European Interest (IPCEI) is laid down in Art. 107(3)(b) TFEU as part of the State aid rules. An IPCEI is a specific possibility to find aid compatible with the internal market.

The IPCEI on hydrogen includes eight ambitious proposals, all of which aim to develop the hydrogen sector, with projects surrounding the generation, transportation, and innovation of green hydrogen. The final selection for the IPCEI will take place in 2020.

Source: SolarPower Europe

0 8

The in-depth study, which analyses hydrogen’s current state of play and offers guidance on its future development, is being launched by Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director, alongside Mr Hiroshige Seko, Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, on the occasion of the meeting of G20 energy and environment ministers in Karuizawa, Japan.

Hydrogen can help to tackle various critical energy challenges, including helping to store the variable output from renewables like solar PV and wind to better match demand. It offers ways to decarbonise a range of sectors (including long-haul transport, chemicals, and iron and steel) where it is proving difficult to meaningfully reduce emissions. It can also help to improve air quality and strengthen energy security.

A wide variety of fuels are able to produce hydrogen, including renewables, nuclear, natural gas, coal and oil. Hydrogen can be transported as a gas by pipelines or in liquid form by ships, much like liquefied natural gas (LNG). It can also be transformed into electricity and methane to power homes and feed industry, and into fuels for cars, trucks, ships and planes.

To build on this momentum, the IEA report offers seven key recommendations to help governments, companies and other stakeholders to scale up hydrogen projects around the world. These include four areas:

  • Making industrial ports the nerve centres for scaling up the use of clean hydrogen;
  • Building on existing infrastructure, such as natural gas pipelines;
  • Expanding the use of hydrogen in transport by using it to power cars, trucks and buses that run on key routes;
  • Launching the hydrogen trade’s first international shipping routes.

 

The report notes that hydrogen still faces significant challenges. Producing hydrogen from low-carbon energy is costly at the moment, the development of hydrogen infrastructure is slow and holding back widespread adoption, and some regulations currently limit the development of a clean hydrogen industry.

Today, hydrogen is already being used on an industrial scale, but it is almost entirely supplied from natural gas and coal. Its production, mainly for the chemicals and refining industries, is responsible for 830 million tonnes of CO2 emissions per year. That’s the equivalent of the annual carbon emissions of the United Kingdom and Indonesia combined.

Reducing emissions from existing hydrogen production is a challenge but also represents an opportunity to increase the scale of clean hydrogen worldwide. One approach is to capture and store or utilise the CO2 from hydrogen production from fossil fuels. There are currently several industrial facilities around the world that use this process, and more are in the pipeline, but a much greater number is required to make a significant impact.

Another approach is for industries to secure greater supplies of hydrogen from clean electricity. In the past two decades, more than 200 projects have started operation to convert electricity and water into hydrogen to reduce emissions.

Expanding the use of clean hydrogen in other sectors – such as cars, trucks, steel and heating buildings – is another important challenge. There are currently around 11,200 hydrogen-powered cars on the road worldwide. Existing government targets call for that number to increase dramatically to 2.5M by 2030.

Policy makers need to make sure market conditions are well adapted for reaching such ambitious goals. The recent successes of solar PV, wind, batteries and electric vehicles have shown that policy and technology innovation have the power to build global clean energy industries.

Enagás, with its subsidiary Enagás Emprende, Toyota España and Urbaser signed an agreement to carry out a pioneering project in Spain that will involve the installation of a hydrogen refuelling station for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and the commissioning of the first fleet of 12 Toyota Mirai units based in Madrid.

Hydrogen is the new energy vector that offers countless possibilities for energy consumption, storage and mobility. It is a viable, clean and sustainable alternative to traditional energy sources. These companies are committed to sustainable mobility, promoting its use in zero-emission vehicles.

The Toyota Mirai is a 100% fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle (FCHEV), powered by electricity produced by the chemical reaction between oxygen (taken from external air) and hydrogen stored in its tanks. It has an output of 155 HP with a range of more than 500 km (NEDC) and can be refuelled in under five minutes, offering a performance equivalent to a conventional vehicle. With water vapour being its only emission, it is a zero-emissions vehicle.

The agreement was signed by Marcelino Oreja (CEO of Enagás), Fernando Impuesto (General Manager of Enagás Emprende), José María López Piñol (CEO of Urbaser) and Miguel Carsi, President and CEO of Toyota Spain.

The hydrogen refuelling station will be located in the San Antonio S.L. service station, Avenida de Manoteras 34, Madrid, and will serve the companies taking part in the project.

According to Marcelino Oreja, CEO of Enagás, “Thanks to various projects, the company is a driving force in developing non-electric renewable energies, such as hydrogen and biomethane, as new solutions in the ecological transition process and in promoting a circular economy”. Regarding this pioneering initiative in Spain, he points out that “the companies that promote it are committed to new sustainable transport alternatives to improve air quality”.

Source: Enagás

0 1

Abengoa takes part in the european Grasshopper (GRid ASsiSting modular HydrOgen Pem PowER plant) project, leading the design, construction and testing of a pilot plant, for subsequent scaling to MW. The objective of this new project is the creation of the next generation fuel cell power plants (FCPP) suitable for a flexible operation for grid support. The power plant will use green hydrogen and convert it into electricity and heat without emissions. With the variations in demand and consumption of energy from renewable sources such as sun and wind, a stable energy supply will rely more and more on flexible operation power plants.

The consortium consists, apart from Abengoa, INEA-Informatizacija Energetika Avtomatizacija, Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells Limited (JMFC), Nedstack fuel cell technology B.V., Politecnico di Milano (Polimi) and Zentrum für Brennstoffzellen Technik Gmbh (ZBT).

The development of a fuel cell system, with significant innovations in the membranes and other components, will be done through modelling, experiments and industrial experience by JMFC, ZBT and Nedstack. Polimi will provide support in the decision-making process through modelling activities and optimization. Implementation of the smart grid functionality into the FCPP control and grid integration will be done by INEA.

The demonstration unit will be installed in Delfzijl, where Akzo Nobel and Nedstack have been testing the fuel cell technology for over 10 years now, connecting to the hydrogen by-product stream of the modern chlorine production facility.

The kick-off meeting of the Grasshopper project took place at the beginning of January 2018 at the Akzo Nobel facilities, in Delfzijl, with the participation of the consortium partners, the members of the Advisory Board and the Project and Financial officers from the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Joint Undertaking (FCH JU), unique public private partnership supporting research, technological development and demonstration (RTD) activities in fuel cell and hydrogen energy technologies in Europe. The demonstration phase and the end of the project will take place in Akzo Nobel facilities.

The Advisory Board, consisting of members from Akzo Nobel Industrial Chemicals B.V, Tennet TSO B.V, SWW Wunsiedel and members of GOFLEX consortium, will be consulted during the project phase.

Coordinated by INEA, the project Grasshopper will have a duration of 36 months a total budget of 4.4 M €. This project has received funding from the Fuel Cells and Hydrogen 2 Joint Undertaking under grant agreement No779430. This Joint Undertaking receives support from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme, Hydrogen Europe and Hydrogen Europe research.

Source: Abengoa

0 4

The Chief Executive of Enagás, Marcelino Oreja, and the Chairman of Redexis Gas, Fernando Bergasa, signed today an agreement to boost renewable hydrogen by creating ‘H2Gas’, the aim of which is the technical development and encourage of production and transmission infrastructure for hydrogen generated from renewable sources.

Under the H2Gas brand, Enagás and Redexis Gas are finalising an initial project which will consist of the development of the necessary technology to produce renewable hydrogen for its use in the industry and mobility sectors. Moreover, both companies will work jointly to advance and develop renewable hydrogen for its introduction into the gas transmission and distribution network. The project comprehends the use of Power-to-Gas technology, allowing hydrogen to be produced from water and electricity and injected into the gas grid, either directly or converted into synthetic natural gas or biomethane.

In the context of energy transition, renewable hydrogen is being positioned as a new, comprehensive energy vector, given that it can be transformed into different forms of energy: electricity, synthetic gas and heat, for its use in multiple applications. Renewable hydrogen enables new connections to be created between energy supply and demand, bringing flexibility to the energy system.

From the environmental perspective, it will be a key energy source for reducing CO2 emissions, in line with the aims of the Paris Agreement. Furthermore, it is seen as a viable short-term option because its use suits to the existing gas network infrastructure, which is already prepared to store and transport both natural gas and gases produced from renewable sources.

The participation of Enagás in H2Gas falls within the framework of the company’s Corporate Entrepreneurship and Open Innovation Programme, Enagás Emprende, and is a step ahead in its commitment to contribute to the development of a low-carbon model. The company has also taken the lead in Renovagas, a pioneering R&D project in Europe that involves the design, construction and trial operation of a 15 kWh pilot plant for the production of synthetic natural gas from biogas and hydrogen. Enagás is currently participating in other initiatives to promote the use of these renewable gases.

In turn, Redexis gas is using the H2Gas project to advance its strategy of advocating and investing in R&D projects based on sustainable energies that bring about technological innovation and promote energy-related and environmental sustainability. This will enable it to accommodate the development of new technologies involving renewable hydrogen as a new energy vector. Redexis Gas maintains a firm commitment to promote the future use of hydrogen, and has been a member of the board of trustees of the Foundation for the Development of New Hydrogen Technologies in Aragon since 2015.

Source: Enagás

0 1

The Everywh2ere Project—part of the EU’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme to ensure the sustainable development and competitiveness of the European economy—will develop gensets using hydrogen fuel cells instead of the traditional fuel-based solutions. This will eliminate the CO2 emissions, noise and fumes produced by existing generator types, leading to hardware that is more environmentally sustainable and can be used in applications where conventional generators are not suitable.

The twelve partners* forming the consortium come from different areas of specialisation (hydrogen supply, engine manufacture, environmental consultancy, and construction), which will generate synergies for the adaptation of the hydrogen engine technology currently used in ships and trucks to applications in construction sites, music festivals, public events in cities, emergency situations, natural disasters and critical buildings (such as hospitals, data centres, etc.).

The five-year project, with a budget of approximately 7 million euros, is aimed at realising 8 plug and play fuel-cell gensets, with different outputs (25 kW and 100 kW), for testing from 2020 onwards at, among others, a number of music festivals, and at construction sites managed by Acciona, such as roads and tunnels, with a view to extrapolating the experience for commercial marketability from 2023.

*The organisations participating in EVERYWH2ERE along with Acciona are: PowerCell d’Appolonia; VTT; Genport SRL; Swiss Hydrogen SA; Mahytec SARL; Fundación para el Desarrollo de las Nuevas Tecnologías del Hidrógeno en Aragón; Delta1; Parco scientifico e tecnologico per l’ambiente SpA; ICLEI European Secretariat GMBH and Linde Gas. The project received funding from the Horizon 2020 Programme (grant reference 779606).

Cars equipped with electric engines or other alternative drives are making major inroads. Scientists at the Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg (ZSW) set out to develop a suitable filling station for these vehicles. Launched in mid-February 2018, this project goes to create a fuel ‘pump’ for the future. This dispenser is to deliver renewable electrical power, hydrogen and methane in the most efficient, cost-effective and purpose-driven way possible. The Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy is funding this project with around €1.3 million. It will run for five years as part QUARREE 100, an initiative to test an urban quarter’s fully renewable power supply.

Vehicular mobility is sure to change markedly in the years ahead. Far more cars running on electricity sourced from wind and the sun will soon be out on the road. The same goes for fuel cell vehicles powered with renewable hydrogen and natural gas vehicles that run on methane, another climate-friendly fuel produced using solar power. The network of charging points and hydrogen filling stations is expanding on a massive scale. Some stations furnish both electricity and hydrogen, but none dispenses electrical power, hydrogen and methane. ZSW aims to change that with this project.

Tiered use of renewable energy

What the Stuttgart-based scientists have in mind is to develop a multi-energy dispenser. The idea is to use the grid to charge electric cars’ batteries with renewable electricity sourced from wind power plants and the like. A large stationary battery will store unused power when supply is greater than demand, and dispense it when demand is greater than supply. “If the battery is full and recharging electric cars cannot deplete it, this green electricity will be converted into hydrogen in a second step,” says ZSW’s Dr. Ulrich Zuberbühler by way of explanation. Fuel cell vehicles run on this type of energy. And if hydrogen production exceeds demand, the surplus gas goes into a storage tank.

Tomorrow’s filling station will include third stage to produce methane when the hydrogen storage tank is full and demand from fuel cell cars is low. Carbon dioxide will then be added to the hydrogen to convert into methane. Both gases react to a catalyst to form methane. This fuel is the main component of natural gas, so natural gas cars can readily use it. If refueling cars do not deplete the methane supply, the surplus gas is stored and then piped into the natural gas grid when the storage tank fills up.

With our project, the coupling of the electrical grid with mobility will not be limited to electric cars,” explains Zuberbühler. “The other alternative drives will also benefit from it.”

ZSW’s researchers are talking about tiered use of renewable energy. Their priority is to make the most of resources by minimizing energy losses. Stage one is the first choice and remains so until its potential is exhausted. The most efficient use of regenerative electricity is to power electric motors. None of the energy is lost in translation, and battery storage loss amounts to no more than ten percent. Stages two and three—conversion to hydrogen and then methanation—are only an option once demand for electrical power has been met. Electrical power can be converted to hydrogen at around 75 percent efficiency; the figure for methane is roughly 60 percent. These gases are long-term, zero-loss stores of energy. Efficiency increases by a few percentage points when the waste heat generated during the conversion process is put to use.

zsw-2

Efforts to enhance components

With this project, ZSW aims to improve the efficiency, service life and cost-effectiveness of the two main components, a high-pressure alkaline electrolyzer and a plate methanation reactor. Scientists want to advance the state of the art for both on a 100-kilowatt scale. Electrolysis and methane synthesis will have to take place separately, which requires some form of hydrogen buffer or intermediate storage facility. The institute will develop a concept for this and assess its safety.

The researchers have three years to develop the technology, work out a safety concept and clarify all the details for approval. The results will be tested at an on-site demo facility starting in 2020.

Stepping up ‘sector coupling’

Green electricity accounts for around a third of the power in Germany’ grid, and its share is growing. This figure expected to rise to 65 percent by 2030. Off-grid use—for example, in electric cars and as an alternative fuel—would help make the transportation sector more climate-friendly. Little progress has been made on this front. The alternative fuels hydrogen and methane also have great advantages. They can serve as chemical media for long-term, loss-free energy storage. On top of that, they can be fed into Germany’s natural gas grid and used to heat buildings without leaving a carbon footprint. The term coined to describe this convergence of electricity, fuel and heating across industries is sector coupling.

The funding for this project is part of a joint initiative of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research and the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs to promote solar in building projects and energy-efficient urban development.

The Zentrum für Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Württemberg (Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg, ZSW) is one of the leading institutes for applied research in the areas of photovoltaics, renewable fuels, battery technology, fuel cells and energy system analysis. There are currently around 235 scientists, engineers and technicians employed at ZSW’s three locations in Stuttgart, Ulm and Widderstall. In addition, there are 90 research and student assistants.

0 1

Once more, in Scotland, hydrogen energy has proven to be an effective and clean alternative with the public presentation of the Surf ´n ´ Turf project, and with the Spanish industrial group Calvera as one of its main suppliers. The Surf’ n’ Turf project´s facilities started their operations after an opening ceremony on the 27th of September which was attended by the Minister for Business, Innovation and Energy of the Scottish Government, Paul Wheelhouse. This project is an innovative initiative seeking to promote the local generation, storage and distribution of hydrogen from renewable sources on the Orkney Islands in Scotland.

Its aim: to locally produce and utilize electric power, with an ensuing reduction in fossil fuel consumption and green-house emissions. For that, a set of facilities for hydrogen production on the isle of Eday from both a marine turbine and electrolyser have been built. Hydrogen is subsequently to be transferred in containers by ferry to the port of Kirkwall, where it will be once again transformed into electric power to supply port buildings and to provide service to moored ships.

The Spanish company Calvera plays a key role in this process that provides a clean and efficient solution for electric power. Thanks to its know-how on high pressure hydrogen storage and transport, Calvera supplied three sets of equipment (truck chassis and tanks) which are essential for the entire operation of hydrogen transport from its energy generation point to end-user location.

International track record

The CALVERA Group boasts a wealth of experience in European hydrogen-related projects. Prior to the Surf ´ n´ Turf project, it took part in the CENIT Sphera project that ended in 2010 and which, under the leadership of Gas Natural and a 30 million euro budget, aimed to develop the comprehensive technology required to introduce hydrogen as a further component into the energy mix. In it, Calvera provided solutions for hydrogen production, storage, distribution and utilization, with particular attention paid towards renewable hydrogen.

At present Calvera is partner to one of the most ambitious initiatives in Europe to promote hydrogen as an energy carrier: the BIG HIT project (Building Innovative Green Hydrogen Systems in an Isolated Territory: a pilot for Europe). With a budget of approximately 11 million euros, including 5 million euros coming from the European Commission, BIG HIT, involves 12 participants from 6 European countries. It seeks to develop the necessary infrastructure for hydrogen production, storage and distribution for the local supply of power on the Orkneys, -as is the case with the Surf ´n ´ Turf project to which it is heir-, as well as from renewable sources such as wind and tidal power. Thanks to this project, the local grid limitations to produce “green” hydrogen will be overcome by making use of the power surplus gone to waste so far.

Likewise, the Spanish company is involved in The Hydrogen Office project, supplying hydrogen storage equipment and supplying power and heating for a block of buildings in the Scottish town of Methil.

Source: Calvera

Over the past four years, the Aragón Hydrogen Foundation has been carrying out the LIFE+ZeroHytechPark project, subsidised as part of the official call for the European Commission’s LIFE+ project and which has developed applications based on hydrogen technologies that can exponentially reduce CO2 emissions, increase the autonomy of the prototypes developed and reduce their charging time.

Today’s fossil fuel-based energy model is unsustainable. There is a high level of dependence on a type of fuel that presents clear disadvantages: their reserves are found in exclusive regions, are highly contaminant and with increasing costs, all of which translates into a real need to change the energy system.

 

Within this framework, the LIFE+ZeroHyTechPark project belongs to the European LIFE+ programme on the environment which, over the course of four years has studied how to achieve more sustainable technology parks, a task for which it has a budget of €1.3m, 50% of which is funded by the European Union. The project, coordinated by the Foundation for the Development of New Hydrogen Technologies in Aragón (the FHA), has enjoyed the support of the following partners: the Technology Park of Andalusia, the Science and Technology Park of Vizcaya and the Walqa Technology Park (PTW). Read more…

Article published in: FuturENERGY September 2016

Growatt
SAJ Electric
AERZEN
COMEVAL