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Planta regasificadora El Musel. Foto cortesía de Enagas / El Musel regasification plant. Photo courtesy of: Enagas

Germany is expected to drive capacity growth in Europe’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification industry from planned and announced (new-build) projects during the outlook period 2019 to 2023, contributing around 31% of Europe’s total growth, according to GlobalData.

The company’s report,‘LNG Regasification Industry Outlook in Europe to 2023 – Capacity and Capital Expenditure Outlook with Details of All Operating and Planned Regasification Terminals’, reveals that Germany is expected to have new-build regasification capacity of 635 billion cubic feet (bcf) by 2023.

Wilhelmshaven Floating and Brunsbuttel are the two upcoming announced regasification terminals in Germany during the 2019 to 2023 period. Both the terminals are expected to start their operations in 2022, with the Wilhelmshaven Floating terminal expected to add the highest regasification capacity of 353bcf by 2023.

Following Germany, GlobalData identifies Spain as the second highest country in terms of regasification capacity growth in Europe adding a new-build regasification capacity of 339bcf by 2023. Spain’s El Musel terminal is expected to have the highest capacity among planned and announced terminals with 247bcf of capacity by 2023.

Croatia has no active regasification terminals currently. The country is expected to add all of its new-build capacity growth from two planned regasification terminals, Croatia Floating and Hrvatska by 2023. Of these, the Hrvatska terminal is expected to have the highest regasification capacity of 211.8bcf by 2023.

Source: GlobalData

Rolls-Royce continues its expansion into the Latin America market through the supply of MTU Onsite Energy generator sets for the power plant of a new pork processing facility in Mexico. It is operated by one of the country’s largest and most technically advanced producers. The power plant is supported by four MTU Onsite Energy Series 4000 gas generators and one MTU Onsite Energy diesel generator under one overall control system. The site is not connected to the grid; therefore, the power solution is completely independent. This is the first off-grid solution of its kind in the Americas for MTU.

Local distributed energy systems expert, Electriz, S.A. de C.V., was awarded the business, leading engineering, procurement and construction for the project, as well as operation and ongoing maintenance of the power plant. Electriz’s ability to customize and deliver highly-efficient systems was a success factor to win the project.

The four gas units are 20-cylinder Series 4000 natural gas systems delivering all together 7.7 MW electrical power, capable of handling the pork processing facility’s altitude of 8,000 feet above sea level with the lowest derating, ensuring maximum power availability at the site. In a second phase, it is planned to use the heat out of the exhaust gas, the oil cooler and the mixture cooler to produce steam and hot water which can be used in the production processes.

A single 16-cylinder Series 4000 diesel generator system with an electrical output of 2 MW is tasked with absorbing greater load blocks than the natural gas units, offering long-term stability to the power plant. The diesel unit will run continuously with loads as low as 10 percent to minimize fuel consumption, allowing the natural gas units to produce more energy. MTU Onsite Energy’s MCS master control panel integrates plant control and remote operation, and all systems run in isolation from the power grid, providing reliable, stable and efficient electrical power to the entire facility.

The pork processing facility, located in Puebla, Mexico, features a power plant that will operate using three different fuel sources, including biogas from livestock waste in a later stage. With the help of the flexible MTU Onsite Energy systems, the plant will have the ability to double its power capacity in the future. The customer already owns and operates a combined heat and power (CHP) plant at a nearby facility using a medium-speed gas generator unit from Rolls-Royce.

Source: Rolls-Royce

Portada_Sep_CongresoIENER-Mayo19

Special report published as a separate issue to the May 2019 edition of FuturENERGY for special distribution at the II International Congress on Energy Engineering, iENER’19, an event celebrated from 26 to 27 June in Madrid, where FuturENERGY had an active presence as media partner. This special report includes various sections focused on: natural gas, renewable gases, energy storage, e-mobility, DHC networks and energy efficiency.

This special report includes the following:

COVER STORY
AESA – Energy assessment: CHP, bioenergy, zero emissions and energy efficiency

NATURAL GAS AND ITS APPLICATIONS
The new natural gas revolution
Gas engines a key actor in the new energy scenario
New range of gas engines. Up to 50% efficiency, with very low emissions

RENEWABLE GASES
The optimal role for renewable gas in a decarbonised energy system

ENERGY STORAGE
Unlocking PV capacity with energy storage
Global battery energy storage market to reach US$13.13bn by 2023

E-MOBILITY
The potential and impact of smart charging electric vehicles on the energy transition
Smart solutions for sustainable mobility
Taking e-mobility to the next level. Charging the electrci vehicle with solar energy

EFFICIENT HVAC
Txomin Enea district heating network: innovation and efficiency in urban planning

ENERGY EFFICIENCY. INDUSTRIAL SECTOR
What type of energy management does industry need? A key to sustainability, efficiency and cost effectiveness
Predictive maintenance technology for electric motors

DOWNLOAD COMPLETE REPORT

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The technology group Wärtsilä has been chosen to provide a flexible power generation solution based on three natural gas fueled Wärtsilä 34SG engines to ensure operational flexibility in the power generation system of Michigan State University’s (MSU) East Lansing campus in USA. The solution will help the university to achieve its energy modernisation plans and support the growing need for efficient energy on the campus.

The Engineered Equipment Delivery (EEQ) has been awarded by The Christman Company (TCC), the main contractor for a project to modernise the campus’ power generation system. The Wärtsilä 34SG engines, operating on natural gas have a total power output of 28 MW. The order with Wärtsilä was booked in March 2019.

MSU operates its own power plant to self-generate its electricity supply. The flexibility and efficiency of the medium-speed Wärtsilä34SG engines will help to modernise the campus generation system and increase its overall efficiency. This addition also accommodates the growing demand for electricity on campus. Furthermore, the fast-starting capability of the Wärtsilä engines will provide the balancing support needed to aid in the integration of intermittent solar energy into the system.

The Wärtsilä engines will provide considerable benefits to the modernisation project including improved overall efficiency and reliability while lowering environmental impact and operational costs of the plant.

The Wärtsilä equipment is scheduled for delivery in the beginning of 2020, and the plant is expected to be fully operational by the end of that year.

Building a sustainable future for the energy industry is the basis of Wärtsilä’s Smart Energy vision, which foresees ultimately 100 percent of power generation coming from renewable energy sources. This is enabled by integrating flexible energy generating assets together with intermittent renewables, such as solar and wind. Wärtsilä engines provide the required operational flexibility to make this possible.

Source: Wärtsilä

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Recent years have seen rapid growth in the global market for liquefied natural gas (LNG), with volumes of exports and imports up 10% in 2018 alone. This expansion is set to continue apace in the years ahead, according to a new forecast from research firm BloombergNEF (BNEF). The report shows that the global LNG market is set to see sharp shifts between excess supply and excess demand during the period 2019-2023. The effect on prices may hinge on weather patterns.

However, growth rates of LNG exports and imports are seen moving out of sync in 2019-2023, with exports increasing faster than imports in 2019, which will put downward pressure on prices unless unusual temperatures in import markets lift demand. Imports will then outstrip exports in 2022-2023.

BNEF’s ‘Global LNG Outlook 2019-2023’ sees LNG supply jumping by 33 million metric tons per year in 2019, reaching a record 358 MMtpa, with the US Gulf Coast, Australia and Russia commissioning or expanding export facilities. Meanwhile, structural LNG demand, or weather-neutral demand at current LNG prices, is expected to rise by 17 MMtpa this year, thanks to additional purchases for power generation and heating in Europe and Asia.

This year’s expected excess supply will be hard for the market to absorb, unless we get a dose of ‘wild demand’ for either a hotter summer or colder winter in North Asia or Europe. If not, there will be pressure on LNG prices.

The prospect of short-term oversupply is not deterring investors. A further seven multibillion-dollar LNG export projects, including three in Louisiana in the US and two in Mozambique, are close to a final investment decision and are likely to put extra supply into world markets post-2023.

BNEF expects the market to become tight again from 2022 onwards, with demand rising due to a higher penetration of gas in China’s inner provinces and the growth of LNG bunkering in inland waterways, and as Thailand and Pakistan become important engines of LNG demand growth.

That period could also prove to be testing for Europe’s power and heating sectors. Europe will become increasingly import-dependent for its gas over the next few years. The LNG market is forecast to tighten by 2023 and European prices will need to be high enough to compete with those of fast-growing markets in Asia and to attract LNG imports.

The jump in LNG demand last year, totalling nearly 30 MMtpa, reflected a 41% surge in the purchasing of the commodity by China, and other significant percentage increases in imports in South Korea, India, Pakistan and Europe. One of the few countries to see a large percentage reduction in demand was Egypt.

On the supply side, 2018 saw the start of production at three LNG ‘trains’, or liquefaction and export facilities, in Australia, at two more in Russia and three in the US. The world’s largest LNG producer, Qatar, increased production only marginally.

One important symbolic change for LNG is the gradual shift away from using crude oil as the price benchmark for contracts, to using a gas index, underlining the way the LNG market has matured as an alternative to coal for electricity generation and for industrial, business and residential heating. The BNEF report indicates that new projects from the US are pushing the mix toward gas indexation.

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Rolls-Royce has signed a contract with EPC contractor TTS Martin, s.r.o. for the supply of a 28 MWe power plant for state-owned utility Martinska teplarenska, a.s. in Slovakia. The plant will be equipped with three Rolls-Royce Bergen B35:40V20AG2 natural gas engines and four hot-water boilers, replacing their entire existing coal operation. As well as electricity, the engines and boilers will supply over 28 MW of heat to most of the 60,000 population of the cities of Martin and Vrutky.

Martinska teplarenska heating plant is currently using mainly low-quality lignite for heat production – which is both low-output and non-ecological. Especially in the conditions prevalent in the Martin region – which is surrounded by mountains and unable to dispel pollution – it is crucial to look for the most effective, most ecological solutions for heat and power production.

The upgrade of the district heating plant is part of Martinska teplarenska’s strategy towards green, sustainable power supplies and the winding-down of their coal operations. They made a strategic decision to invest in gas-fuelled reciprocating engines and gas boilers as a more long-term solution than exhaust gas aftertreatment systems to reduce the emissions given off by coal-fired power plants. The B35:40 gas series meets the increasingly stringent emissions requirements, with exceptionally low emissions of NOx, CO and UHC combined.

The new Martinska teplarenska plant is planned to go into commercial operation at the beginning of 2020, and will be Rolls-Royce’s second power plant using B35:40 Bergen gas engines in Slovakia. The first will under commissioning in May 2019, generating a total of 37 MWe of heat and power for district heating company Teplaren Kosice, a. s.

Rolls-Royce medium-speed engines are designed flexibly for different operating modes, and can be used to generate base-load, peak power or operate in combined cycles. By utilizing hot water from the engines, the plant will be used for district heating in the surrounding area. Heat from the engines can also be used to produce steam in the heat recovery steam generators in order to supply industrial customers if required.

FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

Since the arrival of natural gas in Spain almost half a century ago, no two years have been the same as regards market behaviour. After the calm of the previous year, 2018 has seen a sustained growth in demand, translating into a trend increase in European prices, which started with the minimums of the second quarter of 2017 (14 €/MWh) and reached a peak in the third quarter of 2018 (30 €/MWh). The price then fell due to the economic slowdown and continued uncertainty still felt today…By Javier Esteban, Chairman of GasINDUSTRIAL.

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MAN Energy Solutions has won the contract to provide a new combined-heat-and-power (CHP) solution for Ben Gurion Airport in Tel Aviv, Israel. As the future main energy source, a dual-fuel engine MAN 9L51/60DF will supply the airport with 9.2 MW of electrical energy. The engine will primarily run off a domestic natural-gas supply with plant hand-over – upon its construction by Israeli company, Telemenia – planned for the end of 2019.

The power-plant engine will not only generate electricity, but will also contribute to the airport’s air-conditioning system through combined-heat-and-power generation. Instead of a conventional, compression chiller powered by electricity, the air-conditioning system will exploit heat generated by the engine to provide cooling.

The cogeneration solution not only increases the plant’s efficiency to over 70%, but the airport will also save on the electricity that would otherwise have been required to operate the chiller.

An indispensible solution

With more than 16.5 million passengers a year, Ben Gurion Airport is the largest and most important airport in Israel, making a reliable energy supply indispensable. The operation of the new facility will mean that the airport will no longer draw its energy from the national grid but, rather, will operate independently of the public power supply.

In order to meet high safety standards, the airport’s energy supply must be assured in the event of any crisis. Accordingly, the reliability of the technology used is of great importance. Thanks to its dual-fuel capability, the MAN 9L51/60DF engine will remain fully operational, even during any disruption to its gas supply.

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At the end of October 2018, Rolls-Royce Power Systems opened a new Customer Care Center in Augsburg, Germany, focusing exclusively on customers of natural-gas-powered generator sets. This makes it one of the company’s five new customer service centers that have been in operation since the beginning of 2018. Experts from MTU work together at different locations, and across several time zones, to support customers around the world when it comes to keeping their MTU Onsite Energy systems on the go.

Rolls-Royce Power Systems is also pressing ahead with the expansion of digital services for its customers. The Digital Solutions team is set to double to 80 employees by the end of 2018.

MTU Go! products helping improve the digital monitoring of generator sets

The digital tools MTU Go! Act and MTU Go! Manage will soon be tested in the first power plants. They are replacing the data loggers previously used, and enable MTU experts and the customer to monitor the units remotely, plan maintenance and spare parts availability, analyze operator data and derive recommendations for improving product operation.

Prime Energia puts its trust in MTU’s digitally-assisted service capability

In Chile, five Prime Energia power plants featuring more than 200 MTU Onsite Energy gensets are to be connected to the public grid, providing a total output of 475 MW of reserve capacity to stabilize Chile’s power supplies. The gensets are digitally connected via data loggers to the MTU Go! Manage platform for monitoring and analyzing current system data. Prime Energia monitors the power plants in real time and controls them via the Network Operations Center in Santiago.

MTU Value Care Agreements safeguard system uptime

When the new service agreements are teamed with these new digital tools and the company’s Customer Care Center capability, the customer benefits in terms of reliability, efficiency and longevity of powergen systems are immense. Preventive maintenance work is planned efficiently, maintenance intervals are adjusted, an optimum, transparent cost structure is implemented, and system uptime is guaranteed.

Source: MTU Onsite Energy

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Italy derived most of its electricity from thermal power in 2017, contributing with a 50.7% of its installed capacity, and with natural gas alone accounting for 41%, according to GlobalData. The company’s latest report ‘Italy Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2018 – Market Trends, Regulations, and Competitive Landscape’ reveals that, government policy is oriented towards scrapping coal based capacity between 2025 and 2030, while renewable energy auctions, to be started by 2020, will help to compensate for this loss.

Renewable power is Italy’s fastest-growing energy source, owing to the 2011 referendum that closed any option for the government to restart nuclear power generation and a rising need to ensure energy security. Solar PV and wind power are the leading renewable sources.

Installed non-hydro renewable capacity increased from 1.7 GW in 2000 to 34.5 GW in 2017. Italy recorded notable progress with respect to the development of installed solar capacity, which grew from 19 MW in 2000 to around 19.7 GW in 2017. The onshore wind market also grew exponentially, from 364 MW to 9.8 GW, owing to strong policy support from the government in the form of FiTs. From 2018 to 2030, renewable installed capacity is expected to grow to 63.4 GW in 2030.

Continuous modifications to the support schemes deter long-term investment planning and hinder access to financing and unclear taxation rules are also a significant barrier, especially for biofuels.

GlobalData’s report also finds that gas and oil-based capacities are expected to remain stable in the country with some of its oil-based capacity expected to be converted to gas. Coal based capacity is expected to cease beyond 2024 due to the decommissioning of the existing coal based power plants.

Installed thermal capacity grew from 53.5 GW in 2000 to 58.8 GW in 2017 at a CAGR of 0.6%. Thermal capacity accounted for 50.7% of installed capacity in 2017, of which gas contributed 41%, while coal and oil contributed respective shares of 7.5% and 2.2%. From 2018 to 2030, installed thermal capacity is expected to decrease to 51.1 GW, at a negative CAGR of 1.1%.

Italy imports more than 90% of its coal requirement from South Africa, Australia, Indonesia, Colombia, and the US. It possesses small deposits of coal reserves, most of which are in South Sardinia. It also imports gas, primarily from Algeria and Russia. Although it possesses economically accessible gas reserves, a declining trend in gas production has been observed since the mid-1990s, caused by national energy policies formulated by the government that do not support gas production. However, the government is increasing the share of renewable energy sources over concerns over energy security.

Thermal power’s share is expected to be overshadowed by non-hydro renewable power, with its share in installed capacity declining to 36.9%. The share of non-hydro renewable capacity is expected to increase to 45.8% by 2030.

Source: GlobalData

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