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There were 34 power plant contracts announced in Europe in July 2019, marking a drop of 32% over the last 12-month average of 50, according to GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Power Plant stood at first place when compared with other power tender categories in Europe in July 2019 with 34 contracts and a 45.3% share, followed by Generation Equipment with 17 contracts and a 22.7% share and T&D Equipment with eight contracts and a 10.7% share during the month.

The proportion of contracts by category tracked by GlobalData in the month was as follows:

  • Project Implementation: 31 contracts and a 91.2% share.
  • Consulting & Similar Services: two contracts and a 5.9% share.
  • Repair, Maintenance, Upgrade & Others: one contract and a 2.9% share.

Solar is top technology for Europe power plant contracts in July 2019

Looking at power plant contracts by the type of technology in Europe, solar accounted for 19 contracts with a 55.9% share, followed by wind with 11 contracts and a 32.4% share and thermal with two contracts and a 5.9% share.

Europe power plant contracts in July 2019: Top companies by capacity

The top issuers of power plant contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

  • The Regulatory Authority for Energy (Greece): 322.44MW from 27 contracts.
  • Volkswagen Kraftwerk (Germany): 288MW from one contract.
  • TEAG Thuringer Energie: 63MW capacity from one contract.

Europe power plant contracts in July 2019: Top winners by capacity

The top winners of contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

  • Mitsubishi Hitachi Power Systems Europe (Germany): 288MW from one contract.
  • Spes Solaris (Greece): 75.58MW from seven contracts.
  • MAN Energy Solutions (Germany): 63MW capacity from one contract.

Source: GlobalData

Siemens Finland has created a new business to expand its virtual power plant activity: Vibeco (Virtual Buildings Ecosystem) is an innovative approach to increase the benefits of increasingly decentralized energy systems. The heart of the virtual power plant is a software platform, operated by Siemens, that intelligently balances electrical loads from buildings that have been connected in a microgrid,
incorporating renewable energy and energy storage.

The new virtual power plant (VPP) service platform – a digitized demand-response system – makes it possible for the first time to combine the small electrical loads of buildings or industrial sites, so that building operators can sell energy back to the reserve market, with the ultimate goal to increase the flexibility of the electricity market as a whole.

We are shaping a new market at the grid edge with this technology,” explained Cedrik Neike, Chief Executive Officer Siemens Smart Infrastructure. “Together with the State of Finland, we are pioneering a model for decentralized energy systems to benefit utilities, business and society. The complexity of balancing loads across buildings, the grid and even with eMobility infrastructure requires deep domain expertise in the demand and supply areas.

The VPP service helps balance power consumption, to decrease the need for reserve power and, consequently, cutting carbon dioxide emissions. The Finnish national grid operator, Fingrid, compensates property owners when the VPP feeds energy into the public grid. Finland’s Ministry of Economic Affairs and Employment is providing a grant of 8.4 million euros for the required technology investments.

Siemens already has two pilot customers for its VPP approach: Finnish Railways will connect the iconic Helsinki Central Station as well as two train depots in a microgrid to create a virtual power plant.

Renewable energy is challenging the entire energy system. We want to prepare for these changes now,” says Juha Antti Juutinen, Director of Real Estate at Finnish Railways.

Lappeenranta, a city of 75,000 inhabitants close to the Russian border, will kick off with nine public buildings, scaling up to connect 50 more buildings to a city microgrid.

The virtual power plant service decreases the environmental impact of the city and provides additional income,” says Markku Mäki-Hokkonen, development manager of the City of Lappeenranta.

Siemens’ VPP platform leverages the company’s successful energy optimization project at Sello shopping mall, a property of 100.000 m2 space located in the suburbs of Helsinki. Sello’s microgrid combines energy efficiency, storage, optimization of peak loads, and its own electricity production. In addition, supplying extra energy to the reserve market has led to annual income of around 650,000 euros annually for the Sello property owners.

Source: Siemens

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The support of electricity generated from solid biomass is the most important stimulation for the development of the biomass power plant market. Whereas biomass subsidisation schemes have recently also experienced positive amendments in Europe, Asian countries are currently reducing this kind of support for the first time. This is one of the results of a new ecoprog market analysis.

In 2018, the number of biomass power plants (BMPPs) increased again by about 300 facilities. Today, there are about 3,800 BMPPs with an installed capacity of around 60 GWel.

Subsidies for renewable energies (RE) are the most important factor driving the BMPP market, especially in Europe. The markets in South and North America as well as in many Asian countries are rather stimulated by fuel availability; however, RE subsidies are an important factor for the development of new capacities in these countries as well.

Some of the European biomass support schemes are more than 20 years old. Therefore, many such systems have been reduced and rather geared towards competitive mechanisms in the past years.

In the last year, this trend slowed down to some extent. Poland, for instance, organised BMPP auctions for the first time in 2018, after the introduction had been awaited for many years. However, these auctions showed very limited success – only one project was approved for subsidies. This is because only few project developers participated. In late 2018, Finland also introduced an auctioning system that could benefit electricity generation from biomass. Ireland passed an auctioning scheme, which should increase the establishment of renewable energies (including biomass) until 2025.

Outside of Europe, the number of countries cutting biomass subsidies increased for the first time in 2018. Thailand, for instance, drastically reduced the feed-in tariff for biomass electricity, from about 14.20 €ct/kWh to 6.30 €ct/kWh. Also, Japan lowered the subsidisation for biomass projects with capacities of over 10 MWel and introduced a cap of 200 MWel per year for additional constructions. Argentina reduced the tendering volume for RE in the annual auctions from 1,200 MWel in 2017 to 400 MWel in 2018.

Attractive subsidisation terms remain in place in China and India, the countries with the strongest growth potentials. In 2018, India additionally introduced a nationwide support scheme for building biomass CHP plants (based on grants for the plant construction).

ecoprog_grafica

From a global perspective, biomass electricity subsidisation continues to promote the market development for the construction of BMPPs.

Until 2027, the worldwide market for BMPPs will thus remain on its dynamic development path. We expect the construction of about 1,900 additional biomass power plants with an installed capacity of around 25 GWel.

About 50% of this growth will be realised in Asia, especially in the two lead markets China and India. Also, North and South America will remain attractive markets for electricity generation from solid biomass, and particularly their lead markets Brazil, Canada and the USA.

In Europe, the overall level of support will continue to decline, in order to reduce high costs and improve ecological aspects. The positive changes of the subsidisation schemes, which were observed in 2018, will not be able to completely compensate this development. In sum, the European market will therefore lose some of its drive.

Source: ecoprog

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MAN Energy Solutions has been chosen as the solution provider for two power plants in Bangladesh with a total of 15 MAN engines to boost energy generation capacities in the rapidly developing Asian country.

The first plant is currently being erected in the country’s Chittagong District on the eastern bank of Karnaphuli River and is scheduled to commence operation in 2019. Operated by Anlima Energy Limited, it will be powered by six MAN 48/60 engines with 20.7 MW each. The plant will run on Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) with an overall capacity of 120 MW and feed into the country’s national grid. Next to the engines, MAN Energy Solutions will also supply further auxiliary equipment and supervise erection and commissioning.

Increasing energy demand is still the country’s biggest challenge. Despite successful efforts to add new power plants in the past years, the overall generation capacity of 16 GW is still too low, given the country’s 160 Million inhabitants and vital economic growth rate. The government continues to address this and is encouraging Independent Power Producers to invest in order to achieve an installed base of 24GW by the year 2024.

The second plant will have a total capacity of 167 MW and operate nine MAN 51/60 Dual-Fuel engines. It will be erected in Mirsarai, in the Chittagong District in the south of Bangladesh. End customer of this project is BPDB-RPCL Powergen Limited. Thanks to MAN’s dual-fuel technology the 51/60 DF engines can be operated on either liquid fuel or natural gas, but will use HFO until sufficient gas supply is available. BPDB-RPCL is already operating a 150MW plant with MAN 51/60DF engines in Kodda, Gazipur.

Responsible for Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) of the Mirsarai plant is the Chinese company Sinohydro, a recurring partner for MAN Energy Solutions. Both companies have successfully completed an 80MW power plant in Niamey, Niger in 2016.

While Mirsarai is the first joint project in Bangladesh, it is the latest in a long line of successful power plant ventures for MAN in the South Asian country. In the past years the company has sold or signed contracts for more than 1.85 GW in generation capacities to increase the supply of electricity in the country.

Source: MAN Energy Solutions

A consortium comprising EPC contractor TSK and Rolls-Royce has signed an engineering, procurement and construction (“EPC”) contract with Prime Energía Quickstart Spa, a subsidiary of Prime Energia SpA (“Prime Energía”), for the construction of five power plants across Chile consisting of 265 MTU Onsite Energy 16V 4000 gensets. Prime Energía is a subsidiary of the New York-based Glenfarne Group, LLC (“Glenfarne”), a developer, owner-operator and industrial manager of energy and infrastructure assets. Prime Energía’s five power plants will offer a total combined capacity of 475 MW, which will be connected to Chile’s electricity grid to provide backup capacity to the country’s power supply system.

These power plants are an integral part of Glenfarne’s strategy to develop power infrastructure that supports the proliferation of renewables and the stability of the grid in regions across the Americas with great potential for growth.

The order to deliver the power plants to the first three locations has been officially placed with the consortium, with the order for the two additional plants scheduled to follow shortly thereafter. The gensets will be digitally connected via gateways sending data to the MTU GoManage platform to monitor and analyse system data. The power plants will be remotely monitored and controlled in real time by Prime Energía’s state of the art Network Operations Center in Santiago.

Chile is one of the fastest growing economic powers in Latin America. Demand for energy is expected to grow at an annual rate of 4 per cent over the next 5 years, and the country expects to benefit from the vast availability of renewable power sources. The percentage of renewable energy in the Chilean power mix is growing at a constant rate: its share, in terms of installed generation capacity, has more than tripled since 2012, and in 2017, with a total plant capacity of around 4,300 MW, was approximately 18 per cent. By 2035, no less than 60 per cent of the country’s electricity is expected to be produced from renewable energy, increasing to 70 per cent by 2050. As Chile increases its reliance on weather variable renewable energy sources, there will be an increased requirement for fast-response, cost-competitive backup power sources such as the power plants in Prime Energía’s portfolio to stabilise the electricity grid.

Source: Rolls Royce

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José Manuel Entrecanales, Chairman and CEO of Acciona, on the 30th May called on the international investment community to show “social and environmental responsibility” in order to speed the decarbonisation of economies.

In his speech at the Annual General Meeting, Mr Entrecanales acknowledged that “rapid progress is being made in the introduction of elements that select and discriminate in favour” companies like Acciona, which work to develop sustainable economies around the world.

“However, even leading the main sustainability indices (…) does not guarantee the recognition of most of the financial sector or the global investment establishment,” Acciona ‘s Chairman and CEO said. “As long as shareholders and financiers fail to make social and environmental responsibility key variables in their investment decisions, progress [in decarbonization] will be slow.”

Mr Entrecanales highlighted Acciona ‘s main business results in 2017: EBITDA of €1,275 million (+7%), sales of €7,254 million (+21%), ordinary profit before tax of €382 million (+22%) and more than 37,000 employees (+14%) worldwide.

“These results, slightly above the company’s forecasts, allow us to propose a dividend of €3 per share, 4.3% higher than last year and consistent with our objective of maintaining balanced dividend growth,” Mr Entrecanales said.

Regarding the outlook for 2018, the Chairman expects moderate growth in EBITDA on a comparable basis following the sale of assets. The Net Debt/EBITDA ratio will continue to fall with a view to keeping the ratio below four. This objective will be achieved by growing operating profit, given that the sale of Trasmediterránea and of the solar thermal plants in Spain “concludes the divestment phase with the aim of reducing debt,” the Chairman said.

Main countries

Mr Entrecanales called on the Spanish government to invest more in infrastructure, and to promote the renewable energy sector “with enthusiasm” now that Spain’s economic crisis was over and the country was “much more competitive”.

The Chairman and CEO of Acciona expressed his optimism about Mexico, “where this year we will exceed 1,000 MW of installed wind and photovoltaic capacity and where we are developing construction projects for hospitals, roads, power plants, transmission networks and real estate development“. Among Acciona’s many projects in Mexico, the Group is part of a consortium that is building the New International Airport in Mexico City.

Chile “continues to be our main market in South America with a strong portfolio of renewable energy and infrastructure projects,” Mr Entrecanales noted. The Company has major projects under construction and has also invested in its airport baggage handling business in Chile. The Company’s energy division, meanwhile, has successfully signed a number of bilateral renewable energy contracts (PPAs) with entities such as Google, Empresa Nacional de Minería de Chile (ENAMI) and Falabella, the largest retailer in Chile.

In Australia, Mr Entrecanales highlighted the strategic importance of last year’s acquisition of Geotech, a mid-sized engineering and construction group, which has strengthened Acciona ‘s position in the domestic infrastructure market. He added that “the renewed strength of the renewable electricity market following the imminent dismantling of most of the old coal-fired power plants augurs well for a promising future in energy too”.

In the United States, he said Acciona had “solid prospects” in its main business activities, with state governments, city councils, large companies and a large majority of public opinion in favour of renewable energy, despite the scepticism of the current Administration.

About Canada, Mr Entrecanales highlighted the recently awarded projects for two water treatment plants and the €1.2 billion Site C dam that is currently under construction.

Turning to the Middle East, Acciona ‘s Chairman and CEO said: “It is one of the regions in which we have grown the most in recent years in Infrastructure and Energy, with desalination plants, the largest photovoltaic plant in the world, wind power plants, urban services and large urban transport infrastructures”.

Mr Entrecanales said Acciona ‘s immediate objectives were to consolidate its presence in its key countries and their hinterland, and to increase Acciona’s presence in Africa, with the prospect of new business in Namibia, Kenya, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast and Tanzania.

Main resolutions of the General Meeting

The Shareholders’ Meeting approved the balance sheet and accounts for 2017, as well as the distribution of a gross dividend of 3 euros per share (+4.3%) and the proposed redemption of up to 5% of the company’s capital as an additional formula for shareholder remuneration. The dividend will be paid to shareholders on 2 July.

The assembly appointed Javier Sendagorta and José María Pacheco as new independent directors, replacing Jaime Castellanos and Fernando Rodés.

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According to data from REN (the Portuguese TSO), the renewable electricity produced in March (4,812 GWh) exceeded the consumption of Mainland Portugal (4,647 GWh). The renewable electricity production accounted for 103.6% of the electricity consumption, a value unmatched in the last 40 years. However, there were some hours when thermal fossil power plants and/or imports were required to complement the electricity supply of Portugal, these periods were nevertheless fully compensated by others of greater renewable production.

In the period under analysis, the daily share of renewable electricity in the consumption had a minimum of 86 %, on March 7, and a maximum of 143 %, on March 11. It should also be highlighted a 70-hour period, beginning on day 9, when the consumption was fully assured by renewable sources and another period of 69 hours, beginning at day 12.

These data, besides indicating a historical milestone in the Portuguese electricity sector, demonstrate the technical viability, security and reliability of the operation of the electrical system, with a large share of renewable electricity. The previous maximum occurred in February of 2014 with 99.2%.

In terms of resources, the main highlight goes to hydro and wind that accounted, respectively, for 55 % and 42 % of the monthly consumption. The total March production of renewables also avoided the emission of 1.8 million tons of CO2, which translated in savings of 21 million euros in the acquisition of emission allowances. In this analysis it is also worth noting the high monthly export balance of 19 % of the electricity consumption of Mainland Portugal (878 GWh).

This renewable share had a positive influence on lowering of the average daily wholesale market price, which was 39.75 €/MWh, price much lower than the same period of last year (43.94 €/MWh) when the weight of renewables in the electricity consumption was only 62 %.

Last month’s achievement is an example of what will happen more frequently in a near future. In fact, it is expected that by 2040 the production of renewable electricity will be able to guarantee, in a cost-effective way, the total annual electricity consumption of Mainland Portugal. However, it will eventually be necessary, here and then, the use of natural gas power plants, aggregated to interconnections and storage.

APREN and ZERO – Sustainable Earth System Association consider vital that national public policies and the European framework called “Clean Energy for All Europeans”, which is currently in the final phase of decision, enable Portugal to meet its carbon neutrality objectives by 2050, ensuring a strong expansion of solar energy and allowing decarbonisation through the increase of electricity demand in the transport and in the heating and cooling sectors.

Source: APREN

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Worldwide, there are over 3,500 operational biomass power plants. They generate electricity and heat from solid biomass, reaching an installed capacity of 52.8 GWel. Within a year, 200 biomass power plants with a capacity of almost 3 GWel were commissioned. Significant growth rates in Asia are compensating the less dynamic development in the European key markets. At the same time, consolidation and globalisation continued among the technology providers in 2017. These are two of the results of a current ecoprog market report, called Biomass to Power.

The market for biomass power plants is mainly stimulated by renewable energy subsidies, especially in Europe, where first support schemes for electricity generation from solid biomass were introduced in the 1990s already.

By contrast, fuel availability is the determining factor in North and South American as well as many Asian markets, as subsidisation levels are oftentimes lower than in Europe. North America and Europe mainly use wood to generate energy, while South American countries primarily incinerate bagasse, a residue of the sugarcane industry. Agricultural residues such as straw, rice husks and empty fruit bunches from the palm oil industry are the main fuels in Asia.

What all the plants have in common is their intense waste heat utilisation (combined heat and power, CHP). About 60% of the biomass power plants are located at industrial sites. Many of them are fuelled with local production residues (palm oil fruit bunches, bagasse, wood-processing residues) and in turn deliver heat to the production process. Around 30% of all facilities are connected to district heating grids; most of those are located in colder regions such as Central Europe and Scandinavia. About 10% of the biomass power plants generate power only and do not use their waste heat at all. Many of them are located in China, where waste heat utilisation is not a requirement for obtaining subsidies.

The market development depends on how profitable RE subsidies are, especially in Europe. Many markets are saturated after many years of subsidisation, which would make the construction of new capacities only worthwhile with granting further generous subsidies. Additionally, Europe has fewer agricultural residues that can be used for thermal recovery than other regions.

As the already existing plants run at high operating costs, many European countries are lowering RE subsidies. For instance, the UK decided to no longer organise allocation rounds for renewable energies after 2019. In September 2017, Poland postponed its much-anticipated biomass auction indefinitely. This auction was initially planned for October 2017. Romania does also not seem to consider reintroducing RE subsidies.

Other European countries, however, are strengthening RE support. The Netherlands decided an 8 billion EUR support scheme for 2018, which is as much as in 2017. Finland is to establish a new auctioning system in 2018/2019, which will also include biomass power plants.

Globally, subsidisation systems did not change significantly in the past year. Argentina has to be mentioned as a special case, however: In 2017, the country approved subsidies for 14 biomass power plants with a capacity of 117 MWel and also announced the next auction for 2018.

The worldwide market for BMPPs will continue to develop dynamically until 2026. Throughout the world, another 2,000 biomass power plants with an installed capacity of over 25 GWel will be constructed. About 50% of this increase will happen in Asia and especially in the Chinese and Indian key markets. North and South America are to remain attractive markets for solid biomass electricity generation as well, mainly Brazil, Canada and the USA. The overall subsidisation level in Europe, however, will continue to decrease in the light of high costs and ecological aspects (sustainability). Europe will therefore become a less dynamic market.

As a result of the trends described above, consolidation and globalisation among the technology providers continued in 2017. For instance, UK-based Amec Foster Wheeler Group (today Wood Group) sold its fluidised bed combustion business to Japanese technology provider Sumitomo. Danish technology provider Burmeister & Wain Scandinavian Contractor, part of Japanese Mitsui Group, took over financially troubled plant manufacturer Burmeister & Wain Energy. Danish technology provider Babcock & Wilcox Vølund was imposed a cost-cutting programme by US parent company Babcock & Wilcox, including the dismissal of 30% of staff.

Source: ecoprog

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In line with its strong commitment to tackling the effects of climate change, Iberdrola has decided to complete the process of phasing out all its coal-fired power generation capacity worldwide. The technology represents 1.8% of the group’s total installed capacity of 48,062 megawatts (MW) and 1.5% of its electricity production for the first nine months of the year (1,596 GWh out of 102,494 GWh).To this end, the company has filed a permit application with the Ministry of Energy, Tourism and Digital Strategy to close the coal-fired power plants in Lada (Asturias) and Velilla (Palencia). Both of the assets are situated in Spain and represent a combined capacity 874 MW. With this decision the company ratifies its commitment to reduce its CO2 emissions intensity by 50% in 2030 and become carbon neutral in 2050.

Iberdrola group operates 28,778 MW clean capacity through renewable energy generation sources, mainly onshore and offshore wind (15,902 MW) and hydroelectric power (12,756 MW).

Last week, Iberdrola, together with other leading Energy companies, called upon European policy makers to embrace higher and more ambitious binding renewable energy targets for 2030 by raising the share of renewables in the final energy demand on the continent from the current target of 27% to 35%.

Once the remaining coal-fired plants are closed the company’s emissions-free capacity will stand at 68%. This figure rises to 76% in Spain, where the security of supply will not be impacted by this initiative thanks to the 5,695 MW back-up capacity in combined gas cycles the company operates.

Closure of the plants will not impact the company’s strong commitment to job stability since all the affected employees (90 at Lada and 80 at Velilla) will either be relocated to other facilities or will be engaged in their respective decommissioning process which will last for four years after approval of the closure by the Ministry of Energy, with an investment of €35 million.

Since 2001, the company has phased out 7,500 MW of thermal power capacity (see chart below) worldwide. In 2013 and 2016, Cockenzie and Longannet, two large power plants in the United Kingdom with a combined capacity of 3,600 MW, were closed. Also, between 2001 and 2012 over 3,200 MW of fuel-oil-fired plants were decommissioned in Spain.

Thanks to the progressive decarbonisation of its electricity generation mix, over the past 15 years Iberdrola has become a reference point in the global fight against climate change, having invested €90 billion in the process.

Today, it has become a global leader in onshore wind while bringing down emissions to 70% below its European peers, representing an improvement of 75% since the year 2000.

Commitment to fighting climate change

In 2009, Iberdrola approved its Policy to Fight Climate Change undertaking, among other measures, to support an ambitious global emissions reduction target; to promote the development of efficient technologies to bring down greenhouse-gas emissions; to advocate for an integrated and fair global emissions market while fostering the efficient and responsible use of energy involving all company stakeholders.

Also, and in order to reduce emissions, it is essential for Iberdrola that a strong signal on CO2 prices is given to markets, affecting all sectors of the economy. In addition, the company understands that with the right climate policies the fight to mitigate emissions and adapt to global warming are opportunities for economic growth.

Lastly, the company has been working as a key partner with the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change and has an active presence at COP23 which takes place in Bonn until 17 November.

Source: Iberdrola

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Rolls-Royce Power Systems subsidiary Bergen Engines has signed contracts for the delivery of two power stations to Bangladesh with a contract value of 133 million Euro. The consignments to Confidence Power Rangpur Limited are destined for a power station in Rangpur with an output of 112 Megawatts electrical power. It will be supplied this year. A second, similar power station is set for delivery in 2018. This 150 MW power plant intended for Midland East Power Ltd will be located in Ashuganj. Within the contracts are also spare parts deliveries over 15 years.

These contracts are part of the Bangladesh government’s ambitious plan to more than double national power generation capacity to 38,000 MW to meet a forecast demand of some 33,000 MW by 2030. Meeting this goal will require a substantial increase of a good 9,000 MW over the next four years alone – and this is where the medium-speed engines come in. A power plant based on internal combustion engines is easily built within just one year, whereas other alternatives can take as long as seven years to realize.

 

We are delighted to have been chosen to help develop the power sector in Bangladesh,” comments Jeff Elliott, Managing Director at Bergen Engines. Bergen Engines delivered its first Rolls-Royce genset engine to Bangladesh way back in 2001, and has since built power stations covering over five percent of the country’s overall power supply.

Source: Rolls-Royce

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