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renewable energy

In partnership with the RE-Source Platform, BayWa r.e. has published its Energy Report 2019 which analyses the attitudes of 1,200 European corporations towards renewable energy. While 89% of all those surveyed agreed on the leading role corporations must play in driving the energy transition, 76% identified bureaucracy and complex regulations as major barriers that are hindering further investment in renewables.

 

For the majority of corporations, the benefits were clear – almost 90% felt the use of renewables resulted in a better public image, while 80% felt it gave them a business advantage. And when deciding to invest in renewables, 92% did so to reduce energy costs.

However, a perception of long payback periods (44%) and high investment costs (38%) were identified as barriers by corporations across all surveyed countries. At just under 50%, the perception of investment costs as a barrier was highest in Poland and the UK.

While companies in Germany, the UK and France mainly focus on greenhouse gas emission targets, companies in Poland, Italy and Spain aim to increase the overall use of renewable energy.

Over half of all surveyed corporations were planning to use renewable energy or install their own renewable energy facilities within the next five years. Spanish corporations were particularly ambitious with 76% planning to increase their use of renewables, while Italian corporates recorded 70%.

Source: BayWa r.e.

Bosch is to be fully climate-neutral as early as next year. This will make Bosch the first major industrial enterprise to achieve this goal. In a bid to swiftly achieve carbon neutrality, Bosch will buy more green electricity in the near term and compensate for unavoidable CO2 emissions with carbon offsets. In the years to 2030, the company will gradually increase the share of renewable energy in the power that it generates and buys, and will invest a billion euros to boost its loca-tions’ energy efficiency.

Once Bosch achieves climate neutrality, it will no longer adversely affect carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. The company is thus making an impor-tant contribution to the Paris climate agreement ratified in 2015, which calls for global warming to be kept well below two degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

A selection of exemplary Bosch projects

The Feuerbach plant – energy efficient thanks to people and machinery
Established in 1909, it has steadily and systematically modernized its facilities to contribute to the company’s overall energy efficiency.
Thanks to sessions that train and raise awareness in their team, energy require-ments are down more than 50% compared with 2007; its carbon emissions – re-lative to value creation – are down 47%.

Crunching data to conserve energy at Homburg

The Bosch location at Homburg, in the German state of Saarland, is edging ever closer to the vision of an energy efficient, self-learning plant. It has spared the world around 5,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide in the past two years and more than 23,000 tons since 2007.
Green roofs, photovoltaic systems, and carbon neutrality at Renningen
In Renningen, it has been carbon neutral since January 2019. Carbon offsets fully compensate for the carbon footprint of the natural gas burned by its heating system. The facility buys green electricity to cover its power needs.

Sustainable heating at Rodez

Reduce the site’s carbon footprint – that was what the team at Rodez in France set out to do when it started making plans as far back as 2009. The location now has a biomass heating plant, up and running since 2013. It burns wood chips ob-tained from local certified sustainable forestry resources.
Reducing the carbon footprint at Bidadi and Nashik, India, with power generated on site
Bosch India is pursuing carbon neutrality by tapping locally available, natural sources of energy. Spurred on by the idea of supplying the location with fully renewable power during daytime hours, the team at the Nashik location began installing its first photovoltaic systems in 2015.

Renewables as the main source of power for Bosch in Mexico

Mexico has revamped its energy policy. An energy reform launched there calls for the country to source 35 percent of the electricity from non-fossil fuels by 2024. With many hours of sunshine annually and high-wind regions, Mexico’s geography and climate would certainly support that goal, providing a solid foun-dation for change alongside committed support from government and business. Bosch Mexico was able to save 56,000 metric tons of CO2 in 2018 by switching to predominantly renewable energies.

Source: Bosch

Iberdrola has begun construction on the El Pradillo wind complex in Zaragoza, with an installed capacity of 23 MW. The project, developed in conjunction with Caja Rural de Navarra, represents an investment of 26 million euros and is expected to enter into service at the end of this year.
Located between the municipalities of Frescano, Borja and Agón in Zaragoza province, the wind farm comprises six 3.4-MW Siemens Gamesa G132 wind turbines and one 2.1-MW SG114 turbine.

 

The production generated by El Pradillo will provide clean energy to the equivalent of 10,500 homes/year and prevent the emission of 17,300 TCO2/year.

More investment to lead the energy transition in Spain

With El Pradillo, Iberdrola is strengthening its commitment to renewables in Aragon, where it operates more than 320 MW of wind and hydroelectric electricity production.

Their commitment is to lead the transition toward a fully decarbonised economy by promoting renewable energies and accelerating investment in Spain, where it intends to spend 8.000 M€ between 2018 and 2022.

Iberdrola is currently building new renewable projects (solar and wind) with a capacity of 700 MW and it has 2,500 MW under development and a portfolio in excess of 7,000 MW.

Source: Iberdrola

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American countries are adopting several strategies to ensure an intense shift towards renewable energy and this has already led to significant development in the renewable energy market, according to GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Countries in North and South America are implementing strong policies to comply with renewable energy targets designated by their government. For instance, Chile has publicly announced its targets for renewable energy in the electricity mix: 20% by 2025, 60% by 2035 and 70% by 2050. There are a few states in the US aiming to achieve 100% renewable energy including Washington D.C. by 2032, Hawaii by 2045, Colorado by 2040, and Connecticut and Maine by 2050.

GlobalData’s latest report: ‘North and South America Renewable Energy Policy Report 2019’ reveals that net metering is one of the key driving factors for renewable energy in the residential and commercial segment whereas auction-based competitive bidding is promoting renewable energy in the utility-scale based segment.

Net metering is also a key support mechanism behind renewable energy development in the Americas. In North America, all the three major markets: US, Canada, and Mexico have net metering in place, Mexico being the most recent country to adopt the scheme; whereas in Latin America Brazil, Chile and Peru have already implemented net metering to support renewable energy development. In 2018, Colombia’s Energy and Gas Regulatory Commission announced the resolution (net metering) to regulate the distributed solar generation (up to 100 kW) and distributed generation from renewable sources (between 100 kW and 1 MW).

Eight out of nine countries covered in the report: US, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Canada, Colombia, Chile, and Peru have auction mechanism for various renewable energy technologies. In 2018, Brazil held five auctions; three of them included capacities of solar, wind, bio power and hydropower and the other two were technology neutral. These auctions awarded a total of 2.93 GW capacity in the year.

Source: GlobalData

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The decade-long trend of strong growth in renewable energy capacity continued in 2018 with global additions of 171 GW, according to new data released by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The annual increase of 7.9 per cent was bolstered by new additions from solar and wind energy, which accounted for 84 per cent of the growth. A third of global power capacity is now based on renewable energy.

IRENA’s annual Renewable Capacity Statistics 2019, the most comprehensive, up-to-date and accessible figures on renewable energy capacity indicates growth in all regions of the world, although at varying speeds. While Asia accounted for 61 per cent of total new renewable energy installations and grew installed renewables capacity by 11.4 per cent, growth was fastest in Oceania that witnessed a 17.7 per cent rise in 2018. Africa’s 8.4 per cent growth put it in third place just behind Asia. Nearly two-thirds of all new power generation capacity added in 2018 was from renewables, led by emerging and developing economies.

Through its compelling business case, renewable energy has established itself as the technology of choice for new power generation capacity,” said IRENA Director-General Adnan Z. Amin. “The strong growth in 2018 continues the remarkable trend of the last five years, which reflects an ongoing shift towards renewable power as the driver of global energy transformation.

Renewable energy deployment needs to grow even faster, however, to ensure that we can achieve the global climate objectives and Sustainable Development Goals,” continued Mr. Amin. “Countries taking full advantage of their renewables potential will benefit from a host of socioeconomic benefits in addition to decarbonising their economies.

IRENA’s analysis also compared the growth in generation capacity of renewables versus non-renewable energy, mainly fossil-fuels and nuclear. While non-renewable generation capacity has decreased in Europe, North America and Oceania by about 85 GW since 2010, it has increased in both Asia and the Middle East over the same period. Since 2000, non-renewable generation capacity has expanded by about 115 GW per year (on average), with no discernible trend upwards or downwards.

Highlights by technology:

Hydropower: Growth in hydro continued to slow in 2018, with only China adding a significant amount of new capacity in 2018 (+8.5 GW).

Wind energy: Global wind energy capacity increased by 49 GW in 2017. China and the USA continued to account for the greatest share of wind energy expansion, with increases of 20 GW and 7 GW respectively. Other countries expanding by more than 1 GW were: Brazil; France; Germany; India; and the UK

Bioenergy: Three countries accounted for over half of the relatively low level of bioenergy capacity expansion in 2018. China increased capacity by 2 GW and India by 700 MW. Capacity also increased in the UK by 900 MW

Solar energy: Solar energy capacity increased by 94 GW last year (+ 24 per cent). Asia continued to dominate global growth with a 64 GW increase (about 70% of the global expansion in 2018). Maintaining the trend from last year, China, India, Japan and Republic of Korea accounted for most of this. Other major increases were in the USA (+8.4 GW), Australia (+3.8 GW) and Germany (+3.6 GW). Other countries with significant expansions in 2018 included: Brazil; Egypt; Pakistan; Mexico, Turkey and the Netherlands.

Geothermal energy: Geothermal energy increased by 539 MW in 2018, with most of the expansion taking place in Turkey (+219 MW) and Indonesia (+137 MW), followed by the USA, Mexico and New Zealand.

Globally, total renewable energy generation capacity reached 2,351 GW at the end of last year – around a third of total installed electricity capacity. Hydropower accounts for the largest share with an installed capacity of 1 172 GW – around half of the total. Wind and solar energy account for most of the remainder with capacities of 564 GW and 480 GW respectively. Other renewables included 121 GW of bioenergy, 13 GW of geothermal energy and 500 MW of marine energy (tide, wave and ocean energy).

Source: IRENA

MIREC WEEK 2019, Mexico’s leading clean energy congress and exhibition, will take place alongside a period of changes and new business opportunities within the country’s renewable energy sector as a result of a new administration coming to power at the end of 2018. After the cancellation of the 4th Long-Term Auction and large transmission projects, the government is expected to announce alternative plans to keep Mexico’s renewable energy goals on track, as well as the continued development of transmission infrastructure.

Meanwhile, the industry is currently waiting on the details of the government’s strategy for the development of renewable energy in the country. The AMLO administration has recently reasserted its commitment to the development of renewables, and some of their mentioned plans include the enhancing of Distributed Generation, the installation of EV solar charging stations, the modernization of CFE’s hydroelectric power plants and the development of research, technology and human resources in the sector.

All these changes represent challenges and will bring new opportunities for the renewable energy market. During a recent breakfast briefing hosted by the MIREC WEEK team in Mexico City, the latest updates in the Mexican renewable energy industry were addressed and discussed. The discussion mainly covered the alternatives that the new administration has to meet the growing demand in the country, the continuity of the development of the Wholesale Electricity Market and the crucial role that the private sector must perform in order to achieve its ambitious clean energy goals.

Against this backdrop, MIREC WEEK 2019 will celebrate its 9th anniversary in Mexico City at the World Trade Center from 20-22 May. The award winning event is firmly established as the leading platform for dialogue, knowledge and discussion about the challenges and opportunities in Mexico’s renewable energy market. This year the congress will address a broad range of topics including financing and investment, corporate energy use, distributed generation, energy storage, asset management and O&M and clean energy business strategies under the new AMLO administration.
The event will feature more than 300 high-level speakers from Mexico and across the globe providing 50 hours of expert analysis and content, providing business intelligence for decision-making in a shifting market.
An expected audience of 3,000 participants will attend the exhibition and congress, comprised of energy professionals, national and international investors, technology suppliers and project developers.

MIREC WEEK 2019 is sponsored by global leaders in renewable energy, including Huawei, CPS America, GCL, Longi Solar, Sungrow, Talesun, Alion Energy, Arctech Solar, BayWa r.e. Renewable Energy, Gamesa, Iusasol, Jema, Phono Solar, Soltec, Trunsun Solar, Nextracker, Cesime Solar, Pöyry and Solarig, among others.

Source: MIREC WEEK

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Schneider Electric has launched a new report “Innovative Organizations. 6 trends for companies leading at the renewable energy edge”, that explores the six biggest trends in renewable energy innovation that are shaping the ways these leading-edge organizations are thinking about carbon management and power purchasing.

Organizations will play a considerable role in shaping our global energy strategy. Not only are organizations the largest energy users, they also hold the key to the large-scale adoption of renewable energy and clean technology solutions.

140 global companies have committed to sourcing 100% of their electricity from renewable sources via the RE100.

Carbon reduction

Schneider Electric, is among the 460+ companies to date that have committed to science-based targets. Approximately 2 companies per week join the Initiative. 125 have set and approved targets. This is indicative of an even broader shift: the growing acknowledgement by companies all over the world that global warming and its impacts pose a threat to continued operations that must be addressed through aggressive carbon reduction. A larger investment in a renewable strategy – such as a PPA, global EACs- is required for those organizations that want to use renewables to drive carbon reduction.

Engaging the value chain

Industry sectors such as manufacturing and retail have a significant Scope 3 carbon footprint, and historically, it has been challenging to accurately assess and address these emissions. Leading companies are beginning to engage their suppliers directly on renewable energy purchasing, which reduces the carbon intensity of suppliers’ operational electricity consumption, drives global renewable energy market development, helps provide greater resilience to parent company operations, and can be applied to the reduction of their own Scope 3 footprint.

Emergence of viable global markets

Clean energy markets around the world have begun rapid development. EACs are the predominant technology available in many developing regions. Typically, EACs (a commodity) and their trading schemes form the basis for maturing markets and provide a mechanism for the tracking and trading of renewable energy. According to the report, leading organizations face several challenges when expanding their renewables activity to global markets: availability, credibility, scale and economics. Although the U.S., Canada, and Europe continue to dominate the mature market stage, Schneider anticipates that the rapid growth of markets in India, China, Australia, and others will increasingly present leadership opportunities to organizations with global footprints.

The water-energy nexus

CDP has identified that water is a risk for almost every company in every industry sector. One of the biggest threats to business continuity is water supply, which is further threatened by global warming and can also be mitigated by renewable energy consumption. An inverse relationship also exists between water and energy, in that water consumption requires large volumes of energy, primarily to move, process, heat, and treat the water, but a decrease in conventional energy use can drive a reduction in water consumption, expense, and impact.

Collaborative sourcing models

For some leading companies, the next innovative step is to help open the market for other participants through collaborative sourcing models. These models—which can include aggregation, joint tenancy, and reseller contracting—are allowing smaller companies and leaders alike to achieve larger renewable energy sourcing goals.

New tech: testing the boundaries of renewable generation

According to the report The grid of the future will be a decentralized Meshgrid™, where there is more independent production and consumption of energy, resulting in a new generation of Internet of Things-enabled prosumers. In the most immediate term, leading companies can embrace active energy management (AEM), which recognizes and capitalizes on the interdependencies and synergies between resource reduction targets, enterprise efficiency, renewable energy procurement, and the shape of electricity consumption in both conventional and green markets.

Source: Schneider Electric

Acciona will supply Telefónica with an estimated volume of renewable electricity of 345 GWh, i.e. 58% of the high-voltage energy measured with telemetry that the technology multinational will consume in Spain this year, and 23% of its total electricity consumption.

According to the contract awarded to Acciona, the company will supply 72 points located in large-scale data processing facilities, offices and other centres of Telefónica in Spain. It is the second successive contract for the sale of electricity to Telefónica awarded to Acciona, following the one signed for 2018.

Like all the energy marketed by Acciona, the electricity supplied to Telefónica will be certified 100% renewable by the Spanish National Markets and Competition Commission (CNMC). The use of clean energy will avoid the emission of 107,000 tonnes of CO2 to the atmosphere, based on the energy mix of Spain.

Teléfonica: Also 100% renewable in other markets

The multinational is already fully renewable in other markets such as Germany, Brazil and the UK. This means that it is making progress towards its objective of 100% in all countries by 2030, which will mean a saving of around 6% on its energy bill, equivalent to 1.4% of its present revenues.

Worldwide, more than 50% of the electricity Telefónica uses is clean. It has stabilized its consumption despite a growth in traffic of 107% in the last three years, improving energy efficiency by 52% in the process, and this has been achieved two years before the target dates. In other words, the company is more efficient and consumes greener energy every year. This has led to Telefónica being part of “Lista A” del CDP, an organism that selects leading companies in the management of climate change.

Acciona: The biggest marketer of exclusively renewable energy

Through this contract, Acciona strengthens its business of the sale of energy to large clients in the Iberian Peninsula market, where is it already the biggest supplier of exclusively renewable energy with over 500 clients and 2,700 supply points. The associated volume of energy was 5,900 GWh in 2018, 11.3% up on the previous year.

Among Acciona’s renewable energy clients in the Iberian market are, as well as Telefónica, reference companies in a range of sectors such as Unilever, Bosch, Adif, Inditex, Basf, RTVE, Kellogs, Merck, Bimbo, Roca, Aena, Heinz, Asics, BT, Agrolimen, Volkswagen and the Prado, Reina Sofía and Thyssen-Bornemisza museums.

Source: Acciona

Foto cortesía de / Image courtesy of: ContourGlobal.

Wärtsilä has been awarded an integrated 6 MW energy storage project contract for the Caribbean island of Bonaire. The engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) hybrid energy project includes both the hardware, consisting of batteries and inverters, as well as GEMS, the energy management software from Greensmith Energy, a Wärtsilä company. The order with ContourGlobal Bonaire, a subsidiary of London based ContourGlobal, was booked in Q4, 2018.

The energy storage system will enable Bonaire, part of the Netherlands Antilles, to increase its use of renewable energy such as wind and solar. In order to integrate more renewable energy and its intermittent nature, the Wärtsilä energy storage solution will provide the grid stability and reliability required for the island. The energy storage solution will also prevent situations where generation from renewable sources would otherwise had to be curtailed.

The project will integrate multiple generation assets including all of the island’s existing power generation assets, energy storage, wind and solar. GEMS software will control the island grid of Bonaire, an island of 19,000 inhabitants. Work on the Wärtsilä EPC project has commenced, and final completion is expected in April 2019.

Greensmith’s GEMS software platform offers the widest range of energy storage applications for optimising energy storage, often integrated with a growing variety of renewable and thermal generation assets.

Source: Wärtsilä

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Renewable energy is the most competitive form of power generation in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries, according to a new report published by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). Abundant resources, together with strong enabling frameworks have led to solar PV prices of below 3 cent$/kWh and dispatchable concentrated solar power (CSP) of 7.3 cents$/kWh, which is less than some utilities in the region pay for natural gas.

IRENA’s new ‘Renewable Energy Market Analysis: GCC 2019’, says achieving stated 2030 targets can bring significant economic benefits to the region including the creation of more than 220,000 new jobs whilst saving over 354 mboe in regional power sectors. The targets could reduce the power sector’s CO2 emissions by 136 million tonnes (22 per cent reduction), while cutting water withdrawals in the power sector by 11.5 trillion litres (17 per cent reduction) in 2020.

The findings come as GCC economies seek to diversify their economies against the backdrop of fast-growing domestic energy demand and a desire to safeguard hydrocarbon export revenues for the future.

The GCC is among the most attractive regions in the world to develop large-scale solar and wind energy projects as a result of resource abundance and a favourable policy environment, a fact that is backed up by record low prices,” said IRENA Director-General, Adnan Z. Amin. “As a fossil-fuel exporting region, the GCC’s decisive move towards a renewable energy future is a signal to global investors and to the energy community that we are experiencing a step-change in global energy dynamics and a true energy transformation.

The UAE’s commitment to diversifying the energy mix is central to our long-term economic growth and sustainable development objectives,” said H.E. Suhail Al Mazrouei, UAE Minister of Energy. “IRENA’s GCC analysis provides further evidence of the strong socio-economic case for renewable energy deployment, from job creation to emission reductions. As we look to add generation capacity to serve growing populations and expanding economies, renewables will increasingly serve as central pillar of low-carbon development.

At the end of 2017, the region had some 146 GW of installed power capacity, of which renewable energy accounted for 867 MW. Around 68 per cent this capacity was in the UAE. This represents a four-fold increase on capacity in 2014. Following the UAE are Saudi Arabia with 16 per cent and Kuwait with nine per cent of regional capacity.

With renewable energy targets now in place across the region, the GCC is poised for a significant acceleration in renewables deployment as countries pursue national goals. Under current plans, the region will install a total of almost 7 GW new power generation capacity from renewable sources by the early 2020s.

Solar PV dominates the region’s renewables outlook, accounting for three-quarters of the regional project pipeline, CSP and wind accout for 10 per cent and nine per cent respectively. Solar-assisted enhanced oil recovery in Oman is also expected to contribute about 1 GWth in 2019.

Proactive policies are central to accelerating renewable energy deployment, per the report, suggesting that lessons can be drawn from the GCC countries where substantial inroads have been made thanks to firm government commitments and credible, time-bound targets with a clear focus on a supportive business environment for investments.

Source: IRENA

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