Tags Posts tagged with "renewable sources"

renewable sources

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Inerco Ingeniería, Tecnología y Consultoría enters a Strategic Business Alliance Agreement with the energy storage company SaltX Technology – listed on Nasdaq First North Premier –. The partners enter a joint development plan where the first step is to build a pre-commercial pilot in Megawatt scale during 2020.

Inerco has a strong reputation within thermal power generation engineering and technology. The Energy Storage system to be designed will be charged using a non-dispatchable renewable energy or high temperature waste heat. This system will also allow a controlled discharge in periods of high energy demand, as decarbonised high temperature heat (producing steam for electricity generation or heat for direct industrial use).

The goal is to lower the dependency on fossil fuels and increase the flexibility of thermal and renewable power plants. The partners have also agreed to a road map for commercialising the solution. The target markets for the alliance will initially be Spain, Portugal, Central and South America and Mexico. INERCO will be responsible for the development of the first pilot and will also lead the funding of it.

“Inerco finds relevant advantages in nanocoated salts for thermochemical energy storage, which have led us to establish a strong partnership with SaltX. The future of the energy sector undoubtedly implies the use of robust and cost-effective energy storage solutions to be integrated with hybridised conventional and renewable energy sources. SaltX´s nanocoated salts present intrinsic advantages with respect to systems based on other energy storage principles, such as those using molten salts, concrete, or electric batteries, due to their improved energy efficiency, management and safety characteristics. With this technological approach INERCO is convinced about finding competitive solutions for the new decarbonised energy scenario related to both power generation and energy intensive industries”, says Pedro Marín, CEO of Inerco.

Source: Inerco

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Planned and designed at European level to be an incentive to the development of renewable energies, the Guarantee of Origin system begins to gain importance with the increase of its demand and its price. According to AleaSoft, the price of certificates will tend to rise and will be important in the development of new renewable projects.

Renewable energy producers can apply to the CNMC for a certificate of the energy generated. These certificates show that those kWh were generated from renewable energy sources. There are also Guarantees of Origin for high efficiency cogeneration. These certificates can be transferred to electricity retail companies so that they can justify to their customers the renewable origin of the energy supplied.

Guarantees of Origin were conceived as a tool to provide transparency and guarantee the origin of the electricity generated, and thus encourage the development of renewable technologies. Based on the European directive that mandated the states to ensure that “the origin of electricity produced from renewable energy sources can be guaranteed as such according to objective, transparent and non-discriminatory criteria”, each country of the European Union has regulated the issuance and transfer of Guarantee of Origin certificates.

In 2017, the CNMC issued Guarantees of Origin for 76,683 GWh from renewable sources and 1,803 GWh for high efficiency cogeneration, 81.2% of which were transferred to marketers to cover all or part of their retailed energy.

The mix of energy sources of each retailer will depend on the fraction of their energy covered with the certificates received. With the rest of the energy produced and not covered by Guarantees of Origin, the CNMC calculates a generic mix for the rest of the retailers.

In Spain, the issuance of Guarantees of Origin by the CNMC is free of charge, but the regulation does not allow renewable facilities that receive state subsidies to profit from their transfer. Consequently, in Spain the market of Guarantees of Origin has been traditionally unattractive and with prices of few cents of euro per MWh, very low compared with other European countries where the prices were around 0.20 ‑ 0.30 €/MWh. But this has been changing as there are more renewable plants to market without economic incentives and with the affiliation of the CNMC to the AIB (Association of Issuing Bodies) that manages the trade of Guarantees of Origin in Europe. According to AleaSoft, the Guarantees of Origin will have an important role as an incentive in the new renewable projects since their price will tend to increase in the coming years.

But not everybody thinks that the Guarantees of Origin system is perfect. Its detractors denounce that it is usually used in a deceptive way to confuse the consumer about the origin of the electricity that physically arrives at its meter. Since the issuance and acquisition of certificates does not influence the pool energy mix, which will only depend on the availability of renewable resources at each moment, it is implied that it does not encourage the installation of more renewable power.

What is certain is that the Guarantees of Origin provide transparency for the consumers that allows them to know the environmental impact associated with the energy consumed, and provides more resources to choose the retailer. In addition, for the market, it represents an indication of the demand that exists among consumers to be supplied with renewable energy. And we are not only talking about domestic consumers who are aware of climate change. Since major consumers of electricity such as Google, Facebook and Apple began to announce that they would work to make their electricity consumption 100% from renewable sources, a “green wave” worldwide is leading large companies to also propose a total green electricity consumption. And this “green wave” will continue to spread in cascade as these companies begin to also ask for green certifications to their suppliers. All this has already made the demand for Guarantees of Origin to grow and, consequently, also their price, which, according to AleaSoft, will continue to rise in the medium and long term.

For AleaSoft, the current scenario presents a future where Guarantees of Origin are going to play an important role in the Energy Transition, thanks to the new renewable projects to meet the emission reduction objectives and the increasingly widespread awareness of consumers and retailers about the environmental impact of electricity production.

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Egypt has the potential to generate up to 53 per cent of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030, according to a report by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). The Renewable Energy Outlook: Egypt report, finds that pursuing higher shares of renewable energy could reduce the country’s energy bill by up to USD 900 million annually in 2030.

Renewables could cost-effectively provide up to a quarter of Egypt’s total final energy supply in 2030, per the analysis. Achieving the higher targets would, however, require investment in renewables to grow from USD 2.5 billion per year based on today’s policies to USD 6.5 billion per year. Under current plans, Egypt aims to source 20 per cent of its electricity from renewables by 2022, rising to 42 per cent by 2035. Total installed capacity of renewables in the country today amounts to 3.7 GW.

Egypt can draw on an abundance of renewable energy resources to achieve higher shares of hydropower, wind, solar and biomass. To capitalise on this, the report suggests that national policy makers may benefit from periodically re-evaluating the long-term energy strategy to reflect rapid advances in renewable energy technology and falling renewable power generation costs.

Building on these achievements, Egypt has the opportunity to further raise its ambition which entails substantially increased investments. Attracting these investments requires stable policy frameworks and a streamlined regulatory environment that provides clarity and certainty for investors. Investments in renewable energy not only help to meet rising energy demand but they can also contribute to fostering economic growth, creating employment and developing local manufacturing.

The report was prepared by IRENA in close collaboration with Egypt’s Ministry of Electricity and Renewable Energy, and the New and Renewable Energy Authority.

Source: IRENA

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The technology group Wärtsilä has successfully handed over two new gas engine plants ordered by Centrica, a British multi-national energy and services company. The project is in line with the company’s strategy for de-centralised power production and will ease the integration of intermittent renewable capacity, notably solar and wind power. Wärtsilä was selected to deliver Engineering, Procurement and Construction (EPC) solutions for both sites, located at Brigg and Peterborough in the UK. The orders were booked in January 2017.

The two 50 MW plants will balance the stability of the grid and together will generate enough electricity to supply 100,000 homes. The two-minute fast-starting flexibility of the Wärtsilä solution will support local peaks in demand and the inevitable fluctuations in supply from renewable sources. Operational flexibility provided by Wärtsilä ensures having energy available when the supply from renewables drops.

These two new plants, which will help meet the UK’s changing energy needs and ultimately support the transition to a low carbon future by providing an important back up to renewable generation.

The UK is the leading country in shaping the electricity markets and Centrica is one of its leading operators. Today, renewable power sources provide roughly a quarter of the country’s total generation capacity, compared to five percent in 2006, and the share is increasing all the time. To support this trend, fast-starting, flexible generation is essential.

The two plants will each utilise five Wärtsilä 34SG engines running on natural gas and have now entered commercial operation.

Rapid electrification of energy demand and the rise of energy from wind and solar sources will lead to massive growth of the world’s electricity transmission and distribution systems. This is one of the main conclusions of DNV GL’s Energy Transition Outlook 2018: Power Supply and Use report, which provides an outlook of the global energy landscape up to 2050.

The report forecasts continuing rapid electrification, with electricity’s share of the total energy demand expected to more than double to 45% in 2050. This is driven by substantial electrification in the transport, buildings, and manufacturing sectors. In the transport sector, the uptake of private electric vehicles (EVs) will continue to escalate rapidly, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2027 in Europe expected to be EVs.

The surge in global electricity production will be powered by renewable sources accounting for an estimated 80% of global electricity production in 2050. As the costs for wind and solar continue to fall, those two energy sources are set to meet most of the electricity demand, with solar PV delivering 40% of electricity generation and wind energy 29%.

The rapid electrification will lead to major expansion of electricity transmission and distribution systems both in the length and capacity of transmission lines. DNV GL predicts that the total installed power line length and capacity will more than triple by 2050.

The system operators’ tasks will become substantially more complex; yet there may well be less energy flowing across the networks, resulting in fixed costs becoming a greater part of the bill.

High fractions of solar and wind will create a need for increased use of market mechanisms and changes to the electricity market fundamentals in many countries. This requires major regulatory intervention. Market based price signals are crucial to incentivize innovation and develop economically efficient flexibility options.

Despite major expansion of high-capital-cost renewables and electricity networks, energy will become more affordable. It is predicted that the total cost of energy expenditure, as a share of global GDP, will fall from 5.5% to 3.1%, a drop by 44%. Absolute energy expenditure will still grow by 30% over the forecast period, to USD 6 trillion/yr. DNV GL foresees a shift in costs, from operational expenditure, principally fuel, to capital expenditure. From 2030, more capital expenditures will go into electricity grids and wind and solar than into fossil-fuel projects.

Despite the positive outlook on the expansion of renewable energy and the electrification of key sectors, the energy transition will not be fast enough to meet global climate targets. In fact, DNV GL found that the first emission-free year will be 2090, if the energy transition continues at the pace predicted in its report.

Source: DNV GL

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Acciona Green Energy Developments, a subsidiary of the Acciona Group, was the biggest retailer of 100% renewable electricity in Spain last year, according to data published by the Spanish National Commission on Markets and Competition (CNMC) on the System to Guarantee the Origin and Labelling of Electricity for 2017.

Act 3/2013 attributes the management of the Guarantee of Origin Regime (GdO) to the CNMC. It is a voluntary mechanism that certifies, following a request by an interested party, that a certain amount of electricity has been obtained from renewable energy sources or high-efficiency cogeneration, similarly to the Renewable Energy Certificates in other European countries.

The report approved by the Regulatory Oversight Chamber of the CNMC last April 5th certified, for yet another year, that the origin of all the energy supplied by Acciona Green to its customers is 100% renewable as it has sufficient guarantees of origin. Furthermore, the energy is generated by the Group’s own renewables facilities.

According to this report, Acciona Green provided its customers in Spain with Guarantees of Origin for a total of 5,309 gigawatt-hours (GWh) of electric power, free of charge. This figure represents 16.4% of the electricity with this kind of guarantee supplied to customers in Spain.

It also transferred another 964 GWh under the Guarantee of Origin Regime to energy retailers in other Member States of the European Union, a possibility envisaged in the legislation.

“Corporate clients increasingly demand energy of certified renewable origin to comply with their sustainability policies and reduce their carbon footprint, which gives us a competitive advantage in a market that is ever more sensitive to the fight against climate change”, says Acciona Green Director Santiago Gómez Ramos. “Our position is clear in this respect: we only generate and sell renewable energy, both in Spain and in 13 other countries around the world”.

Unique on the Ibex-35

Acciona is the only company listed on the Ibex-35, the reference stock market index in Spain, that only generates and markets energy of renewable origin. This means that the CNMC is able to grant it an ‘A’ grading every year, indicating the lowest environmental impact on a scale from A to G, because its electricity generation does not produce CO2 emissions or radioactive waste.

The report by the CNMC states that the Guarantee of Origin Regime represented 30.4% of total national electricity production in 2017, and 70.7% of the amount generated from renewable sources and cogeneration.

The Guarantee of Origin Regime has seen exponential growth in Spain. In 2010, three years after it was set up, the number of electricity generation plants within it was 7,644 (according to figure from the CNMC), while in 2017 it reached 36,659, almost five times more. The number of consumers has undergone a similar evolution (calculated on the number of supply points), going from 393,000 in 2010 to 1,909,872 last year.

The CNMC’s report shows a reduction in the contribution of renewables in the Spanish electric power mix against the previous year from 39.8% to 32%, mainly due to lower inputs from hydropower stations, a higher participation of fossil-fuel technologies (coal and gas) and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power. The result was an increase in CO2 emissions, from 0.25 kg/kWh in 2016 to 0.31 kg/MWh in 2017. The generation of high-level radioactive waste also increased, from 0.51 mg/kWh in 2016 to 0.54 mg/kWh last year.

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Cupertino, California — As part of its commitment to combat climate change and create a healthier environment, Apple today announced its global facilities are powered with 100 percent clean energy. This achievement includes retail stores, offices, data centers and co-located facilities in 43 countries — including the United States, the United Kingdom, China and India. The company also announced nine additional manufacturing partners have committed to power all of their Apple production with 100 percent clean energy, bringing the total number of supplier commitments to 23.

“We’re committed to leaving the world better than we found it. After years of hard work we’re proud to have reached this significant milestone,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “We’re going to keep pushing the boundaries of what is possible with the materials in our products, the way we recycle them, our facilities and our work with suppliers to establish new creative and forward-looking sources of renewable energy because we know the future depends on it.”

RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS

Apple and its partners are building new renewable energy projects around the world, improving the energy options for local communities, states and even entire countries. Apple creates or develops, with utilities, new regional renewable energy projects that would not otherwise exist. These projects represent a diverse range of energy sources, including solar arrays and wind farms as well as emerging technologies like biogas fuel cells, micro-hydro generation systems and energy storage technologies.

Apple currently has 25 operational renewable energy projects around the world, totaling 626 megawatts of generation capacity, with 286 megawatts of solar PV generation coming online in 2017, its most ever in one year. It also has 15 more projects in construction. Once built, over 1.4 gigawatts of clean renewable energy generation will be spread across 11 countries.

Since 2014, all of Apple’s data centers have been powered by 100 percent renewable energy. And since 2011, all of Apple’s renewable energy projects have reduced greenhouse gas emissions (CO2e) by 54 percent from its facilities worldwide and prevented nearly 2.1 million metric tons of CO2e from entering the atmosphere.

SINGAPORE

Apple’s renewable energy projects include:

  • Apple Park, Apple’s new headquarters in Cupertino, is now the largest LEED Platinum-certified office building in North America. It is powered by 100 percent renewable energy from multiple sources, including a 17-megawatt onsite rooftop solar installation and four megawatts of biogas fuel cells, and controlled by a microgrid with battery storage. It also gives clean energy back to the public grid during periods of low occupancy.
  • Over 485 megawatts of wind and solar projects have been developed across six provinces of China to address upstream manufacturing emissions.
  • Apple recently announced plans to build a 400,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art data center in Waukee, Iowa, that will run entirely on renewable energy from day one.
  • In Reno, Nevada, Apple created a partnership with the local utility, NV Energy, and over the last four years developed four new projects totaling 320 megawatts of solar PV generation.
  • In Japan, Apple is partnering with local solar company Daini Denryoku to install over 300 rooftop solar systems that will generate 18,000 megawatt-hours of clean energy every year — enough to power more than 3,000 Japanese homes.
  • In Singapore, where land is scarce, Apple adapted and built its renewable energy on 800 rooftops.
  • Apple is currently constructing two new data centers in Denmark that will run on 100 percent renewable energy from day one.

SUPPLIER COMMITMENTS

To get to 100 percent renewable energy for its own facilities, the company worked to set an example for others to follow. Apple also announced today that 23 of its suppliers are now committed to operating on 100 percent renewable energy, including nine new suppliers. Altogether, clean energy from supplier projects helped avoid over 1.5 million metric tons of greenhouse gases from being emitted in 2017 — the equivalent of taking more than 300,000 cars off the road. In addition, over 85 suppliers have registered for Apple’s Clean Energy Portal, an online platform that Apple developed to help suppliers identify commercially viable renewable energy solutions in regions around the world.

New supplier commitments include: Arkema, DSM Engineering Plastics, ECCO Leather, Finisar, Luxshare-ICT, Pegatron, Quadrant, Quanta Computer, Taiyo Ink Mfg. Co,…

Ilustración del concepto Smart Power Generation / SPG concept illustration

The technology group Wärtsilä has been the pioneer to promote flexibility in energy systems to enable greater use of solar and wind power. The company’s Smart Power Generation solution was launched ten years ago in recognition of growing environmental awareness within the industry, and in anticipation of increasing adoption of energy from renewable sources. As the energy industry transformation accelerates, with traditional baseload plants unable to efficiently cope with the new realities, Wärtsilä’s vision is being endorsed with an increasing market share in the <500 MW market segment, growing from 13 percent in 2016 to 19 percent in 2017, according to the McCoy Power Report. The cost competitiveness of wind and solar power is rapidly increasing. For example, the cost per kW of wind power plants has dropped by 40 percent during the past 20 years, while the cost per kW of solar plants has dropped by more than 90 percent during the same period. Consequently, renewables currently represent one of the cheapest ways to produce electricity in areas with good wind and solar conditions, making them viable without the need for government subsidies. Today, wind and solar power plants produce approximately 1,100 GW of electricity globally and forecasts indicate that this will increase to 2,000 GW by 2024. That flexibility is essential in systems using energy produced by wind and solar is today an unchallenged fact. Wärtsilä’s approach, with its Smart Power Generation solution, provides the ability to go offline and restart quickly, multiple times per day, while its energy storage capabilities serve to smooth variations in supply and store excess power from renewables. “Wärtsilä’s share of the global power plant market is growing because we have successfully established ourselves as a systems integrator and service provider in this changing world. We can offer not only power generation assets, but also storage and integration software solutions, as well as operations, maintenance and lifecycle optimisation of the assets,” says Javier Cavada, President, Wärtsilä Energy Solutions.

Recent examples of the role that Wärtsilä’s Smart Power Generation is playing in this energy transition include two power plants ordered by the Upper Michigan Energy Resources Corporation in the USA. They will accommodate a broad range of operating profiles for which flexibility is a prime requirement. In Arizona, Tucson Electric Power (TEP) is building a 200 MW Wärtsilä Smart Power Generation plant to provide the needed flexibility for integrating more wind and solar into its system. AGL Energy Ltd, one of Australia’s leading integrated energy companies, recently ordered a 211 MW Wärtsilä plant to provide the reliability and fast-starting capability required to enable increased levels of energy from renewable sources.

Source: Wärtsilä

Tackling corrosion issues and developing new materials in the wave, tidal and offshore wind sectors across Europe could save up to €84,000 million for developers and create up to € 82,000 million of supply chain opportunities by 2050, according to two new reports.

Commissioned by the NeSSIE project, the reports investigated the economic potential of anticorrosion solutions and the development of new materials in the offshore renewables market.

Corrosion is an important concern for offshore energy developers. All marine structures face corrosion problems impacting on the operations and maintenance (O&M) costs along the global lifecycle. In the case of offshore wind farms, the O&M costs are typically around 15 – 30 per cent of the total lifecycle, with corrosion issues a significant factor in these costs.

The reports found that based on offshore renewable deployment estimations, anti-corrosion solutions and new materials could see potential developers saving over €16,000 million for wave and tidal energy projects in the EU by 2050 and potentially over €68,000 million of savings for offshore wind projects. For the anti-corrosion supply chain, the wave and tidal energy markets could potentially lead to over €25,000 million of projects in the wider EU by 2050 and over €57,000 million for offshore wind projects.

Jan Reid, team leader in the energy and clean technologies team within Scottish Enterprise, said: “This early work is really encouraging. We can see there is a tremendous economic prize for the EU offshore supply chain in tackling this challenge and supporting the EU to decarbonise the energy sector. The key to unlocking this opportunity is developing investable demonstration projects that will prove the technological solutions. Working together with Stakeholders, we at NeSSIE are excited to be involved in the development of anti-corrosion solution demonstration projects.”

The reports contribute to NeSSIE’s overall objective of developing three investable demonstration projects in offshore renewables focused on corrosion and materials. The projects will utilise the existing EU subsea supply chain and their knowledge to develop commercial solutions.

Schneider Electric has committed to sourcing 100% renewable electricity and is throwing light on the doubling of its energy productivity. The company strongly believes it cannot go renewable without ensuring optimization of its energy system first. This commitments are yet another step-in Schneider Electric’s journey to becoming carbon neutral by 2030. Aligned with these commitments, Schneider Electric decided to join two global, collaborative initiatives, led by The Climate Group and bringing together influential businesses committed to accelerating climate action:

RE100: to use 100% renewable electricity by 2030 with an intermediary objective of 80% by 2020
EP100: to double energy productivity by 2030, against a 2005 baseline, setting an ambitious target to doubling the economic output from every unit of energy consumed

Schneider Electric strives to answer the world’s new energy challenge by boosting energy efficiency
everywhere: in homes, buildings and cities, industry, the grid, and throughout remote community. In a world more decarbonized, more digitized, more decentralized, energy use needs to be more productive. In order to deliver on its new promises and its sustained energy efficiency efforts, Schneider Electric will leverage its own technical solutions (EcoStruxure Power, EcoStruxure Grid). Using these solutions, the Group has been able to reduce its energy consumption by 10% every 3 years for the past 10 years. More specifically, Schneider Electric has reduced consumption by 6 between 2008 and 2017 at its headquarters in France, The Hive. These commitments will cover more than 1,000 electricity consuming sites around the globe, including 200 factories. Schneider Electric will leverage a broad range of renewable energy sources, including but not limited to solar, wind, geothermal and biomass.

Schneider Electric will drive its transition to 100% renewable electricity through three levers, with an interim goal of achieving 80% renewable electricity use by 2020 to 100% in 2030:

On-site projects at Schneider Electric facilities around the world: with renewable energy initiatives, already in place at some Schneider Electric locations, such as a solar rooftop at its sites in Vadodara (India), Bangpoo (Thailand), or geothermal energy and a solar rooftop at its flagship office “The Hive”, France, among multiple others. Schneider Electric will install on-site renewable energy projects to help achieve its 2030 target. While on-site projects are expected to deliver a portion of Schneider Electric’s renewable electricity needs only, they will add to the company’s renewable energy capabilities, and act as a showcase for other organizations contemplating such options, together with energy efficiency enabling technologies.
Offsite long-term procurement through Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs): a PPA is a longterm (12-20 year) contract between a renewable energy developer and a dedicated, creditworthy
buyer. PPAs enable developers to secure financing for new wind, solar or other renewable electricity
projects and allow buyers to enjoy predictable pricing from clean energy sources.
Energy Attribute Certificates (EACs) and green tariffs: an EAC is a free market instrument which verifies that one megawatt hour of renewable electricity was generated and added to the grid from a green power source. Schneider Electric will use EACs as a flexible and fast way to acquire and track renewable electricity.

Emmanuel Lagarrigue, Chief Strategy Officer and Executive Vice President at Schneider Electric said: “We are in a new world of energy that is becoming more electric, more decarbonized, more decentralized, and more digital. Our mission at Schneider Electric is to supply the technologies that permit, drive and catalyze the transition to a new world of energy. The commitments we have made today in joining RE100 and EP100 to source 100% renewable electricity and reflect on the doubling of our energy productivity are a demonstration of how consumers and business can be empowered to ensure the affordability, resilience, sustainability, and security of the energy that they consume.

Helen Clarkson, Chief Executive Officer at The Climate Group said: “Already a leader in the energy space, joining RE100 and EP100 represents a smart business decision for Schneider Electric. These commitments will help the company to deliver on its wider climate ambitionto become carbon neutral by 2030. Doubling energy productivity will help it to use energy as economically as possible while making the transition to renewables, which are themselves cost-competitive in many markets. I welcome the powerful signal Schneider Electric is sending to peers, investors and governments, to accelerate the transition to a zero-emissions economy.

At COP21 in Paris in 2015, Schneider Electric announced 10 Commitments for Sustainability. The
commitments were aligned with the Planet & Society Barometer, Schneider Electric’s sustainability scorecard to measure its ambitious commitment to sustainable development on a quarterly basis and contribute to the UN Sustainable Development Goals. These commitments support the company’s objectives to make its plants and sites carbon neutral by 2030, in a coherent industry ecosystem encompassing both suppliers and clients.

In addition, to become a carbon neutral company by 2030, recent initiatives from Schneider Electric include:

Climate Leadership Council: at the beginning of 2017, Schneider Electric became a founding
member of the Climate Leadership Council in the U.S., to support a new market-based climate solution
that is both pro-growth and pro-environment.
Global Footprint Network: in summer 2017, Schneider Electric signed a partnership with the Global
Footprint Network, an international non-profit organization, to enable a sustainable future where all
people have the opportunity to thrive within the means of one planet.
Launch of EcoStruxure™: 12 months ago, in November 2016, Schneider Electric launched the next generation of EcoStruxure, its IoT-enabled, plug-and-pay, open architecture that delivers end-to-end solutions in six domains of expertise – Power, IT, Building, Machine, Plant and Grid – for four end markets: Building, Data Center, Industry and Infrastructure.
Livelihoods Carbon Fund: Together with Crédit Agricole, Danone, Firmenich, Hermès, Michelin, SAP, and Voyageurs du Monde, Schneider Electric has launched a new impact investment fund, with a target of 100 million euros. The fund aims to improve the lives of 2 million people and avoid the emission of up to 25 million tons of CO2 over a 20-year span.

Source: Schneider Electric

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