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The overall renewable power capacity in Brazil is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 6% from 31 GW in 2018 to 60.8GW in 2030, according to GlobalData.

GlobalData’s latest report: “Brazil Power Market Outlook to 2030, Update 2019 – Market Trends, Regulations, and Competitive Landscape” reveals that increased renewable energy auctions, promotion of hybrid renewable energy projects and other government initiatives such as tax incentives, smart metering, renewable energy targets and favorable grid access policies for renewable energy are likely to result in renewable expansion by 2030.

Between 2019 and 2030, solar PV and onshore wind segments are expected to grow at CAGRs of 14% and 6%, respectively. The significant rise in these two technologies will result in renewable energy being the second largest contributor to the country’s energy mix by 2030.

The connection of over 25,000 power systems, mostly solar PV systems to the Brazilian grid in mid-2018 under the net metering scheme, further underpins the renewable growth pattern over the forecast period.

The main challenges for Brazil’s power sector are its overdependence on cheap hydropower for base-load capacity and lack of a robust power grid infrastructure. In 2018, hydropower accounted for 62.7% of the country’s total installed capacity. In case of a drought, depletion of dam reservoirs could result in power shortages and switching over to costly thermal power which will increase the electricity prices.

In the long term, hydropower capacity is expected to decline and be compensated with increased renewable power capacity. On the other hand, thermal and renewable capacities are slated to increase and contribute 28% and 18%, respectively of the installed capacity in 2030.

Brazil is moving towards a balanced energy mix as it prepares to double its non-hydro renewable power capacity by 2030. With an almost 10GW increase in thermal power capacity by 2030 compared to 2018, the country is on course to better manage peak demand, reduce dependence on hydropower and maintain a healthy grid.

Source: Globaldata

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Global clean energy investment, 2004 to 1H 2019, $ billion

The first half of 2019 saw a 39% slowdown in renewable energy investment in the world’s biggest market, China, to $28.800 M$, the lowest figure for any half-year period since 2013, according to the latest figures from BloombergNEF (BNEF).

 

The other highlight of global clean energy investment in 1H 2019 was the financing of multibillion-dollar projects in two relatively new markets – a solar thermal and photovoltaic complex in Dubai, at 950MW and 4.200 M$, and two offshore wind arrays in the sea off Taiwan, at 640MW and 900MW and an estimated combined cost of 5.700 M$.

The Dubai deal in late March, for the Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum IV project, is the biggest financing ever seen in the solar sector. It involves 2.600 M$ of debt from 10 Chinese, Gulf and Western banks, plus 1.600 M$ of equity from Dubai Electricity and Water Authority, Saudi-based developer ACWA Power and equity partner Silk Road Fund of China.

The two Taiwanese offshore wind projects, Wpd Yunlin Yunneng and Ørsted Greater Changhua, involve European developers, investors and banks, as well as local players. Offshore wind activity is broadening its geographical focus, from Europe’s North Sea and China’s coastline, toward new markets such as Taiwan, the U.S. East Coast, India and Vietnam.

BNEF’s figures for clean energy investment in the first half of 2019 show mixed fortunes for the world’s major markets. The “big three” of China, the U.S. and Europe all showed falls, but with the U.S. down a modest 6% at 23.600 M$ and Europe down 4% at 22.200 M$ compared to 1H 2018, far less than China’s 39% setback.

Breaking global clean energy investment down by type of transaction, asset finance of utility-scale generation projects such as wind farms and solar parks was down 24% at 85.6 M$, due in large part to the China factor. Financing of small-scale solar systems of less than 1MW was up 32% at 23.7 M$ in the first half of this year.

Investment in specialist clean energy companies via public markets was 37% higher at 5.600 M$, helped by two big equity raisings for electric vehicle makers – an $863 M$ secondary issue for Tesla, and a 650 M$ convertible issue for China-based NIO.

Venture capital and private equity funding of clean energy companies in 1H 2019 was down 2% at 4.700 M$. There were three exceptionally large deals, however: $1 billion each for Swedish battery company Northvolt and U.S. electric vehicle battery charging specialist Lucid Motors, and 700 M$ for another U.S. EV player, Rivian Automotive.

Source: BNEF

Vietnam’s solar market is a good news for the solar industry with growing demand of electricity and government policy to promote PV development. With the support from Alena Energy and LONGi Solar, Growatt held its Shine Elite PV workshop on July 4 at Novotel Saigon Centre in Ho Chi Minh City.

The meeting highlighted training on Growatt’s smart inverter solutions. “Inverter technologies have been the innovation center of PV systems in recent years and Growatt has been making a lot of progress as we keep increasing our investment in R&D.” said Frank Qiao, Growatt co-founder and sales director.

Growatt technical manager Adam Sun presented latest product developments for residential, commercial and industrial scenarios. New series residential inverter MIN features an OLED display and touch button design appeals to many clients. It will be launched in Vietnam soon! In addition, recently our latest inverter MAX, which we strongly recommend for implementation in commercial and industrial solar rooftop projects, has been used in a 3MW solar plant in Ninh Thuan.” said Sun.

Service engineer Roger Tian laid out inverter architecture, component selection, installation, operation instruction and troubleshooting for the audience. Growatt monitoring system is at the heart of customer service. Growatt offers a variety of monitoring devices, such as ShineMaster, ShineWifi and ShineLink to meet different demand of internet connection methods. Apart from monitoring installation and setup, Tian detailed registration, configuration and function on Growatt’s Online Smart Service platform.

At the event Alena Energy’s director shared his optimism on the prospect of Vietnam solar and encouraged collaboration with global leading PV brands to develop solar energy across Vietnam. Reliable and advanced inverter and module technologies are key to the success of Vietnam’s solar ambitions. Ms.Vu Thi Thanh Van, LONGi senior sales manager introduced its cutting-edge solutions. “LONGi’s half-cut mono PERC module solution provides higher yields, higher reliability and lower power degradation.” she said.

The workshop today is the consistent effort by Growatt to improve customer service and better prepare our partners for system installation, operation and maintenance. Growatt is committed to the solar development in Vietnam and we will continue to work with our clients and provide our expertise and training on product and service.” said Derrick Ding, Growatt Vietnam sales manager.

Source: Growatt

Australia’s growing battery storage industry has prompted the update of battery rules. From June to July Growatt will join a number of senior industry experts in New Battery Rules Training Workshops held by Australia’s SEC (Smart Energy Council) and present its smart solar storage solutions to the audience. PV and battery installers, designers, electricians and sales representatives are coming together for training on battery installations, system configurations and storage solutions.

Growatt provides a wide range of solar storage solutions for customers. Growatt SPH single-phase and three-phase hybrid inverters can work at both on-grid and off-grid modes, and they are also compatible with a variety of lithium batteries. For existing solar system, owner can choose to retrofit the system with Growatt SPA single-phase or three-phase inverter and turn it into energy storage system.

Yet, that’s not all. At the event in Melbourne on June 27, Growatt product manager Rex Wang introduced a neat storage ready inverter, TL-XH. The inverter works with low voltage battery and is perfect for home owners who are looking to convert their rooftop PV systems into solar storage systems in the future. What makes it more special is its smart storage management system. With the system, Growatt can gather real-time battery data, including cycle number, cell information, voltage and current of each battery cell. Customers can read the electricity generation, battery status, power consumption on Growatt OSS(Online Smart Service) platform. This data can also help service engineers quickly analyze and diagnose the system and locate faulty part in case of a system failure.

Furthermore, Growatt has been developing and testing its Smart Home Energy Management System that will maximize energy production and optimize power consumption of your solar storage system according to your system location, power consumption habits, etc. In addition, grid operators can access Growatt storage system and integrate the system into the “Micro Grid” to enhance grid stability.

For better customer experience, Growatt offers battery, inverter and accessories as a package. Customers can avoid the hassle reaching out to both inverter and battery manufacturers in case there’re system issues. With extraordinary products and services Growatt has become the World Top 3 Single-Phase PV Inverter Supplier by 2018 according to IHS Markit. Globally, Growatt shipped a total capacity of more than 3.3 GW inverters in 2018 and the number is expected to reach 4 GW this year.

Source: Growatt

Acciona has begun construction work on the 64-MWp Usya photovoltaic plant, the third owned by the company in Chile. Acciona is currently constructing almost 400 MW in Chile in two wind farms and two photovoltaic plants, which will enter service in late 2019/early 2020.

 

The Usya plant, located in the municipality of Calama (Antofagasta region), will have a maximum capacity of 64 peak megawatts (MWp) -51 MW rated capacity- and an estimated annual emission-free energy generation of 146 GWh, equivalent to the electricity demand of around 70,000 Chilean households.

The new photovoltaic plant will be equipped with 187,200 modules mounted on fixed structures, which will be installed on a surface area of 105 hectares. The plant is expected to enter service in mid-2020.

Around 400 people will work in the project during the period of highest construction activity. After it enters service, the new plant will avoid the emission of around 141,000 T of CO2 to the atmosphere from coal-fired power stations.

Other plants in Chile

Acciona is currently building three other renewable energy facilities under its ownership in Chile, two wind farms in La Araucanía totalling 267 MW and a 62-MWp photovoltaic plant in Atacama, which will join the 291 MW already in service in the country.

The company’s construction effort will lead to a total of almost 700 MW of renewable capacity under its ownership in Chile by 2020, with an investment of around 1,000 M.

Eleven million people were employed in renewable energy worldwide in 2018 according to the latest analysis by the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). This compares with 10.3 million in 2017. As more and more countries manufacture, trade and install renewable energy technologies, the latest Renewable Energy and Jobs – Annual Review finds that renewables jobs grew to their highest level despite slower growth in key renewable energy markets including China.

The diversification of the renewable energy supply chain is changing the sector’s geographic footprint. Until now, renewable energy industries have remained relatively concentrated in a handful of major markets, such as China, the United States and the European Union. Increasingly, however, East and Southeast Asian countries have emerged alongside China as key exporters of solar photovoltaic (PV) panels. Countries including Malaysia, Thailand and Viet Nam were responsible for a greater share of growth in renewables jobs last year, which allowed Asia to maintain a 60 per cent share of renewable energy jobs worldwide.

Beyond climate goals, governments are prioritising renewables as a driver of low-carbon economic growth in recognition of the numerous employment opportunities created by the transition to renewables,” said Francesco La Camera, Director-General of IRENA. “Renewables deliver on all main pillars of sustainable development – environmental, economic and social. As the global energy transformation gains momentum, this employment dimension reinforces the social aspect of sustainable development and provides yet another reason for countries to commit to renewables.

PV and wind remain the most dynamic of all renewable energy industries. Accounting for one-third of the total renewable energy workflow, solar PV retains the top spot in 2018, ahead of liquid biofuels, hydropower, and wind power. Geographically, Asia hosts over three million PV jobs, nearly nine-tenths of the global total.

Most of the wind industry’s activity still occurs on land and is responsible for the bulk of the sector’s 1.2 million jobs. China alone accounts for 44 per cent of global wind employment, followed by Germany and the United States. Offshore wind could be an especially attractive option for leveraging domestic capacity and exploiting synergies with the oil and gas industry.

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Renewable energy jobs highlights:

  • The solar PV industry retains the top spot, with a third of the total renewable energy workforce. In 2018, PV employment expanded in India, Southeast Asia and Brazil, while China, the United States, Japan and the European Union lost jobs.
  • Rising output pushed biofuel jobs up 6% to 2.1 million. Brazil, Colombia, and Southeast Asia have labour-intensive supply chains where informal work is prominent, whereas operations in the United States and the European Union are far more mechanised.
  • Employment in wind power supports 1.2 million jobs. Onshore projects predominate, but the offshore segment is gaining traction and could build on expertise and infrastructure in the offshore oil and gas sector.
  • Hydropower has the largest installed capacity of all renewables but is now expanding slowly. The sector employs 2.1 million people directly, three quarters of whom are in operations and maintenance.

Source: IRENA

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Iberdrola is moving forward with its renewables strategy with the Francisco Pizarro project which, with 590 MW and an investment totalling more than €300 million, will become Europe’s largest photovoltaic solar plant.

Francisco Pizarro, which is now being processed by the Ministry for the Ecological Transition, will occupy a 1,300-hectare site falling within Caceres’ municipal areas of Torrecillas de la Tiesa and Aldeacentenera. During the construction phase and until the plant is commissioned in 2022, up to 1,000 people will be employed on the site. It will be larger than the Núñez de Balboa photovoltaic plant that Iberdrola is building in Usagre (Badajoz) which, with 500 MW, is so far the biggest in Europe.

The project will generate enough clean energy to supply 375,000 people every year, more than the total population of the cities of Cáceres and Badajoz; and will prevent the emission of 245,000 tons of CO2 into the atmosphere every year, evidence of the value of this technology to protect the environment and mitigate climate change.

More than 2,000 MW under construction and processing

With the addition of Francisco Pizarro, Iberdrola is now building or processing more than 2,000 MW in Spain, accounting for 70% of investments in the company’s plan for 2022, with a target of 3,000 MW in the country.

The remaining renewable projects under development in Spain are, so far, the following:

• In Cáceres, Extremadura, the Ceclavín (328 MW), Arenales (150 MW) and Campo Arañuelo I and II photovoltaic plants (50 MW each) are undergoing administrative processing.
• In Andalusia, Iberdrola is developing the 50 MW Andévalo photovoltaic project, located within the largest wind farm in Continental Europe, promoted and managed by Iberdrola.
• The Romeral 50 MW photovoltaic project will be built in Cuenca;
• In Burgos, Iberdrola has wind farms with installed capacity of 73 MW under administrative processing (Herrera’s wind farm complex and La Lora’s one).

In Spain, Iberdrola has more than 700 MW renewables under construction (the Núnez de Balboa photovoltaic plant and wind projects in three regions), expected to go into service between 2019 and 2020.

All these renewable plants will become the flagship for Spain’s leadership in Extremadura, Spain and the European Union in the transition to a more sustainable energy system.

Plan to relaunch clean energy in Spain

Iberdrola is the biggest producer of wind energy in Spain, with installed power of 5,770 MW, while its total installed renewable capacity, including both wind and hydroelectric, is 15,790 MW. The company has a total of almost 30,000 MW installed capacity around the world.

The activities underway are part of the clean energies relaunch plan designed by Iberdrola in Spain, entailing an investment of 8 billion euros between 2018 and 2022 and commissioning 10,000 new MW until 2030.

The plan will create jobs for 20,000 people, almost ten times the number working in traditional generation in the company.

These projects form part of the global investments that Iberdrola will make between 2018 and 2022, totalling 34 billion euros.

Source: Iberdrola

Master D, a company with 25 years of experience dedicated to training professionals in the renewable energy sector, offers educational programmes that aim to ensure that their students gain entry into the job market. It provides an open, student-orientated training so that they can study online, with a state-of-the-art virtual campus and the possibility of undertaking practical classes in specialised classrooms at the MasterD centres distributed all over Spain.

The MasterD Technological Institute offers professional Master’s Degrees in renewable energy and energy efficiency, as well as more specialised training such as courses in Wind Power, Solar PV and Thermal Energy.

Training in such an up-to-the-minute and important field such as Renewables must be constantly updated as this industry, as with the specialisations such as automation and communications, is undergoing constant change, driven by the technological advances that are taking place at a dizzying pace.

MASTERD-2New technologies such as lithium batteries for solar applications that are going to revolutionise the market with their extremely high levels of efficiency, several thousand service life cycles, the absence of memory effect, zero maintenance and many other advantages, must all feature in the training provided.

MasterD has committed to introducing this technology into its training programme as it becomes more widespread and over time becomes the new standard in solar batteries.

In addition, “we are going to introduce MPPT (Maximum Power Point Tracking) regulators into our content, as they are much more efficient than the conventional PWM (Pulse Width Modulation), which are almost obsolete and will soon be replaced”, explains MasterD.

MasterD also uses the latest versions of calculation programmes, such as PVSol and TSol, for its renewables courses as well as communication programmes with solar inverters, such as the VE Configure programme, which offer a far better understanding of the parameters and concepts relating to inverters and solar chargers.

As a result of recent changes to the legislation on self-consumption, as from this summer, there is going to be a new solar boom and the demand of companies for specialised profiles to cover their needs will become a frequent occurrence. Such profiles include solar power engineers and technicians with specialised qualifications, such as the Professional Master in Renewable Energy for which MasterD has an increasing number of successful students that find work thanks to the fact that it involves a very specialist training.

In addition, MasterD continues to actively collaborate with leading companies in the renewables sector, both in the distribution of PV material, such as Sumsol, or directly with manufacturers such as Ferrol, Ingeteam and, in the near future, GoodWe. We also offer workshops and practical seminars that will teach topical content, such as the above self-consumption of solar power, which is currently the talk of the town.

But best of all is that the students of the MasterD Technological Institute can carry out internships at these and at many other renewables companies, in addition to having automatic access to exclusive job offers for MasterD students.

If you would like to find out more about self-consumption, we recommend you watch the following video; and if you are interested in receiving training in this sector, with its fantastic future prospects, make sure that you find out about the courses taught by the leading companies in the sector offered by the MasterD centre.

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Soltec launches the second edition of its Solteach educational programme. The leading company in the manufacture and supply of solar trackers, based in Molina de Segura (Murcia), is offering 20 spaces free of charge to engineers from all over Spain to be taken up by the best academic transcripts on conclusion of their studies and by professionals who would like to specialise in renewables in the PV energy sector.

You can register as from Wednesday, 15 May with applications accepted up until Sunday, 2 June. The course involves an intensive 80-hour course covering two weeks. During the first week the classes will be taught at the ENAE School of Business Administration (Murcia), with the second week taking place at Soltec’s offices. The training course also includes a visit to one of the company’s PV plants.

This programme seeks to give the brightest professionals the opportunity to come into contact with and receive training from the renewables company of reference in Murcia that has demonstrated the best growth in recent years and enjoys the largest market share in Latin America and the US. In addition, the trainee will benefit from training from our experienced team of engineers, with the opportunity to enhance their knowledge by taking part in our projects and thereby foster their entry into the job market.

During the training course, the teachers will assess every student and those achieving the best results will be recruited for a three-month apprenticeship. After this period, selected candidates could join the company’s staff.

Soltec is very committed to job creation and, thanks to this programme, we are looking to give an opportunity to the best professionals in the sector to receive training in renewable energy”, comments Raúl Morales, company CEO.

CLICK HERE more information and to apply for the course.

Global energy investment stabilised in 2018, ending three consecutive years of decline, as capital spending on oil, gas and coal supply bounced back while investment stalled for energy efficiency and renewables, according to the International Energy Agency’s latest annual review.

The findings of the World Energy Investment 2019 report signal a growing mismatch between current trends and the paths to meeting the Paris Agreement and other sustainable development goals.

Global energy investment totalled more than USD 1.8 trillion in 2018, a level similar to 2017. For the third year in a row, the power sector attracted more investment than the oil and gas industry. The biggest jump in overall energy investment was in the United States, where it was boosted by higher spending in upstream supply, particularly shale, but also electricity networks. The increase narrowed the gap between the United States and China, which remained the world’s largest investment destination.

Still, even as investments stabilized, approvals for new conventional oil and gas projects fell short of what would be needed to meet continued robust growth in global energy demand. At the same time, there are few signs of the substantial reallocation of capital towards energy efficiency and cleaner supply sources that is needed to bring investments in line with the Paris Agreement and other sustainable development goals.

Renewables investment edged down, as net additions to capacity were flat and costs fell in some technologies, but was also supported by plants under development. Lower solar PV investment in China was partly offset by higher renewable spend in some areas (e.g. United States, developing Asia).

Energy efficiency spending was stable a second year in a row, with limited progress in expanding policy coverage. Despite soaring EV sales, transport efficiency has stagnated, while spending in buildings dipped.

Investment in renewable heat and transport edged down, but spending on new biofuels plants grew.

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The world is witnessing a shift in investments towards energy supply projects that have shorter lead times. In power generation and the upstream oil and gas sector, the industry is bringing capacity to market more than 20% faster than at the beginning of the decade. This reflects industry and investors seeking to better manage risks in a changing energy system, and also improved project management and lower costs for shorter-cycle assets such as solar PV, onshore wind and US shale.

Even though decisions to invest in coal-fired power plants declined to their lowest level this century and retirements rose, the global coal power fleet continued to expand, particularly in developing Asian countries.

The continuing investments in coal plants, which have a long lifecycle, appear to be aimed at filling a growing gap between soaring demand for power and a levelling off of expected generation from low-carbon investments (renewables and nuclear). Without carbon capture technology or incentives for earlier retirements, coal power and the high CO2 emissions it produces would remain part of the global energy system for many years to come. At the same time, to meet sustainability goals, investment in energy efficiency would need to accelerate while spending on renewable power doubles by 2030.

Among major countries and regions, India had the second largest jump in energy investment in 2018 after the United States. However, the poorest regions of the world, such as sub-Saharan Africa, face persistent financing risks. They only received around 15% of investment in 2018 even though they account for 40% of the global population. Far more capital needs to flow to the least developed countries in order to meet sustainable development goals.

The report also found that public spending on energy research, development and demonstration (RD&D) is far short of what is needed. While public energy RD&D spending rose modestly in 2018, led by the United States and China, its share of gross domestic product remained flat and most countries are not spending more of their economic output on energy research.

Source: IEA

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