Tags Posts tagged with "solar power"

solar power

0 1

JinkoSolar, a reputable PV module manufacture in the world, today announced that according to media reports, Hanwha Q Cells this week filed actions against Jinko in the US ITC, US District Court of Delaware, and Germany’s regional Düsseldorf court. The actions follow the rapid growth of solar energy in the US and German markets where Jinko has been successful.

Based on Jinko’s preliminary analysis of Hanwha’s complaints and the asserted patents, the Company believes that the complaints are without technical or legal merit. Jinko, therefore, categorically refutes Hanwha’s allegations.

Jinko is working closely with its legal counsel and technical advisors to vigorously defend against the claims made by Hanwha. The company is considering all legal avenues available, including petitioning for the invalidity of Hanwha’s alleged patents. Jinko looks forward to prevailing in court. Jinko fully respects intellectual property rights and encourages healthy competition, but it will take legal action to defend itself, its clients, and its partners.

Jinko does not expect any disruption to its normal operations arising from this matter. JinkoSolar has been allocating substantial resources to R&D over many years, and has broken world records for cell efficiency. Jinko will strive to maintain its market leadership in solar module supply to the US and EU markets, providing its customers with high quality products and timely delivery.

Source: JinkoSolar

    0 6

    PV

    Growatt is one of the world’s top PV inverter brands. Established in 2010, Growatt started with a vision to lead in the PV inverter sector and contribute to clean energy. Growatt provides a broad range of solar energy solutions, including solar inverters from 750 W to 2.52 MW, energy storage solutions for on-grid and off-grid applications, smart energy solutions etc. Driven by the expertise of over 200 professional R&D engineers and continuous investment, Growatt has grown into a global leader with presence in over 100 countries. By 2017 Growatt has become one of the global TOP 10 PV inverter brands according to IHS Markit.

    www.ginverter.com

    0 0

    Solar PV has experienced exponential growth in recent years, with global installed capacity increasing ten-fold from 2010 to 2017 – annual capacity additions rose from less than 20 GW in 2010 to 40 GW in 2014 and a record-breaking 97 GW in 2017. At the same time, wind power has continued to expand, adding about 50 GW annually over the past five years.

    Together, solar PV and wind have the potential to transform electricity worldwide, with significant impacts on the operations of whole systems and the economics of all sources of electricity. But to what degree can we reasonably expect such exponential growth to continue?

    China is the engine of solar PV growth

    China has been the driving force behind the exponential growth of solar PV, accounting for 75% of global growth in solar PV deployment over the five years leading up to 2017 (though official data indicates that additions declined in China in 2018).

    China’s success in this sector has been thanks to a virtuous cycle of strong policy support and falling technology costs. For example, China’s 2020 targets for solar PV have been ratcheted up several times, rising from an initial target of 1.8 GW set in 2008, to 105 GW in the 13th Five-Year Plan set at the end of 2016. Recent discussions are looking to 210 GW or beyond.

    Support policies have also played a determining role in other world leaders of solar PV. In the United States, the extension of tax credits in late 2016 gave a significant boost to both solar PV and wind power markets, complementing state-level renewable energy goals that continue to evolve. In the European Union, the renewables target of 27% for 2030 set in 2016 was recently revised up to 32%. In India, implementation measures have been expanding, including in 2016 doubling the amount of land set aside for solar PV deployment.

    What would exponential growth mean for annual solar PV deployment?

    Driven in part by these strong policies, the solar PV market has grown dramatically, at a rate of 27% annually over the past five years. However continuing at this pace would mean a doubling of annual deployment every three years, passing 200 GW in 2020 and exceeding 2 100 GW in 2030. This would represent a massive scaling up that would go beyond any level of construction seen in the past, at more than 6-times the capacity of all technologies built in 2015. It would also require mobilising a dramatic level of investment.

    For now, policy has been the key driver in accelerating deployment, but maintaining this growth rate would far outpace established policy goals. For example, combining the policy ambitions of the US, EU, Japan, China and India would require only about 70 GW of solar PV per year. Even in the case where actions to mitigate climate change and reduce air pollution accelerate, as defined in the IEA’s Sustainable Development Scenario (SDS), solar PV deployment in these leading regions would rise to about 120 GW per year to 2030, a level well below what is implied by continued exponential growth.

    Falling costs will accelerate deployment, right?

    In addition to support policies, solar PV growth has been driven by impressive cost reductions, falling by about two-thirds over the past five years with all indications pointing to further reductions in the future. New utility-scale solar PV projects completed in 2017 had average levelised costs of electricity (LCOE) of just over $100 per megawatt-hour (MWh), based on standard financing over 20 years. Best-in-class projects with preferential financing can costs as much as 60% less today and recent auction bids indicate that next wave of leading projects could cost $30 per MWh or less.

    However, low costs do not guarantee accelerated deployment, as they are only part the story. In this light, to better assess the relative competitiveness of technologies WEO2018 included a new metric of competitiveness that has been developed over several years, called value-adjusted LCOE (or VALCOE).

    VALCOE builds on the foundation of LCOE that incorporates all cost elements, but also adds three categories of value in power systems: energy, flexibility and capacity. Combining these elements provides a stronger basis for comparisons between variable renewables like solar PV and dispatchable.

    From this perspective, hourly simulations of electricity demand, supply and electricity prices in China, India, the United States and European Union all point to a more complex picture for the competitiveness for several technologies, including solar PV.

    In India for example, the LCOE of new solar PV is projected to drop below that of coal-fired power plants by 2025. But the story is different using VALCOE. As the share of solar PV surpasses 10% in 2030, the value of daytime production drops and the value of flexibility increases. After 2030, even with further cost reductions, solar PV becomes less competitive.

    Ultimately, the ability of market forces to drive exponential growth will depend on the profitability of solar PV without government intervention. This calls for a healthy return on investment in the face of market risk, a challenging prospect for solar PV or any power generation technology today, as current market designs rarely monetise all the services provided. Exponential growth also calls for solar PV to outcompete not only alternatives for new investment but also the existing power plants based on costs and value.

    For example, recent deployment of onshore wind highlights that falling costs alone may not lead to ever-increasing deployment. In 2017, the LCOE of onshore wind power continued to decline to about $75 per MWh globally, some 30% lower than utility-scale solar PV. However, global capacity additions fell for the second year in a row to 44 GW in 2017, well below the record of 65 GW set in 2015.

    The future of solar PV, like so many parts of the energy system, will continue to depend largely on decisions made by governments. With pressing global and local environmental concerns, governments should look to ratchet up ambitions related to all low carbon options, including solar PV and wind power, but also nuclear, carbon capture utilisation and storage, hydro, bioenergy and renewables for heat and transport. Without this boost, the annual market for solar PV may stagnate or decline, an unfortunate fate that has happened to many other promising technologies.

    BrentBy Brent Wanner
    WEO Energy Analyst
    International Energy Agency

    Powertis, developer of large-scale PV projects in Europe and Latin America, will develop 2 GW of solar PV over the next three years between Brazil and Spain, 1 GW per country. Headquartered in Madrid and less than a year old, Powertis has secured power purchase agreements (PPAs) for 1 GW in Brazil. In addition, Powertis is entering into the Spanish market where offers turnkey services ranging from feasibility study to project financing.

    In less than 15 seconds, enough energy from the sun reaches the Earth to keep the world running using clean energy. For this reason, we are convinced that the future will be solar. At Powertis, we focus on large projects that use the latest technology, minimizes the cost of solar, and let us negotiate sophisticated bilateral contracts, with the ultimate goal of offering a guaranteed and sustainable return to our investors,” says Pablo Otín, CEO of Powertis.

    The construction of the first projects in Brazil will start in the first quarter of 2020 and the entire portfolio, which exceeds 1 GW, will be connected to the grid before December 2021. “Our main goal is to establish Powertis as the leading company in the bilateral market in Brazil”, states Otín. He also adds that this country, together with Spain, are two of the most active regions in the global PV market in bilateral PPAs. “We are taking advantage of these opportunities to showcase our team’s unique knowledge when it comes to contract and finance this type of projects.

    Source: Powertis

    0 0

    A combination of high electricity tariffs, falling PV prices and a lack of reliability in the grid is spurring sales of on-site solar to business customers in Sub-Saharan Africa. This is the conclusion of a new report by research company BloombergNEF (BNEF), commissioned by responsAbility Investments AG, assessing the potential of commercial and industrial solar opportunities in the region.

    The report entitled “Solar for Businesses in Sub-Saharan Africa” finds that the commercial and industrial (C&I) solar sector in Sub-Saharan Africa is growing not because of regulatory support – as has been the case in many developed economies – but because of economics. On-site solar power is cheaper than the electricity tariffs paid by commercial or industrial clients in 7 out of 15 markets in Sub-Saharan Africa (excluding South Africa) studied by BNEF.

    While the market is still small, it has great potential. An immense energy deficit and crumbling infrastructure makes Sub-Saharan Africa fertile ground for solar. As of November 2018, developers built a record number of 74 MW serving business customers directly, offering them cheaper power than the grid. Kenya, Nigeria, and Ghana installed 15 MW, 20 MW, and 7 MW respectively as of November 2018.

    BNEF_AFRICA

    According to the authors, the financial sector has yet to take on a major role in providing funding for C&I solar systems. So far, most business customers have bought systems for cash, without using third-party finance. There are, however, big opportunities for specialized financiers in the region to do more.

    responsAbility-managed funds have financed the off-grid solar sector in Sub-Saharan Africa for five years, focusing primarily on residential customers. The company expects solar to be increasingly deployed on C&I sites, where it often complements diesel power generation.

    Electricity outages are commonplace across most of Sub-Saharan Africa. When the grid is out, customers must either shoulder high opportunity costs from lost sales or manufacturing output, or resort to much costlier backup power, usually from diesel. This is where financing solar installations can contribute to climate change mitigation by replacing fossil fuel.

    responsAbility, in cooperation with the dedicated climate fund it manages, and the Swiss State Secretariat for Economic Affairs (SECO), commissioned BNEF to identify and assess potential target markets for C&I solar in Sub-Saharan Africa. Following a desk-based regional study that identified three high-priority markets, BNEF conducted interviews with 36 stakeholders in those markets. Overall, stakeholders are optimistic about the future and BNEF expects 2019 to be a record year for the C&I industry.

    Source: BloombergNEF

    0 0

    aventron has signed with Solarpack Corporacion Tecnologica general contractor agreements for the turnkey construction of two PV plants in Spain with a capacity of 50 MW each. Both projects have already passed the required environmental impact assessments and the final building permits are expected at the beginning of 2019. The development partner is the Spanish company Synergia Energy Solutions SL.

    The two ground-mounted systems in the Toledo and Murcia regions are among the first major solar projects in Europe to be implemented and operated without subsidies or other direct government support instruments. Each individual park will cover an area of around 90 hectares and is expected to generate around 95 million kilowatt hours of electricity per year. The total amount of energy generated thus corresponds to the annual requirements of a city with around 55,000 inhabitants.

    aventron is currently in advanced negotiations on the power purchase agreements for the energy generated in the projects and is structuring the necessary external financing on this basis. Financial close and start of construction is expected in the second quarter of 2019.

    The two solar park projects Bargas and Algibicos are a milestone in the implementation of aventron’s growth strategy. On the one hand, aventron exceeds the short-term target of 500 MW for portfolio expansion earlier than planned and on the other hand, its solar production segment will be substantially strengthened. aventron’s next step is to achieve an installed capacity of 600 MW in its core areas of wind, water and sun by the end of 2020.

    Source: aventron

    0 0

    The municipality of Talaván in Cáceres will be home to one of Spain’s largest solar photovoltaic power plants, and one of the first in the country to be financed outside renewable energy auctions. The European Investment Bank (EIB) is financing this project with a EUR 70m Juncker Plan loan with the aim of helping to combat climate change. When it starts operating in 2020, this new plant will prevent the release of 263 000 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere a year by generating electricity using solar energy.

    The EIB is granting this EUR 70m in financing to Talasol Solar via a project finance arrangement making it possible to build and operate the new facility. The solar plant will have a capacity of 300 MW.

    The project is under development by Ellomay Capital Ltd. and is a major step forward for the renewable energy sector in Spain as it is being financed at market rates. The EIB is providing this loan under the Investment Plan for Europe, known as the Juncker Plan. This increases the EIB Group’s capacity to finance investment projects that, in line with the Plan’s criteria, involve activities which by their structure or nature make it possible to support objectives such as combating climate change and ensuring sustainable economic growth.

    The new Talaván solar photovoltaic plant will create new economic opportunities in the Extremadura region. The project will necessitate the employment of 500 people during the implementation phase and 15 on a permanent basis once the plant is operational. It will also help achieve the objectives set by the National Renewable Energy Action Plan, which states that 20% of the energy used in Spain in 2020 must come from renewable sources.

    The EIB and climate action

    The EU bank is the multilateral institution that provides most finance for climate action worldwide. The EIB dedicates at least 25% of its total activities to this priority, a figure that increases to 35% for developing countries.

    Source: EIB

    0 0

    SolarPower Europe has launched its “Grid Intelligent Solar – Unleashing the Full Potential of Utility-Scale Solar Generation” report, which shows that solar is not only the lowest cost power source in many regions and crucial to meet EU climate targets, but also a reliable partner that helps to keep the grid stable and supports Europe’s security of supply.

    Solar PV has transitioned from being a renewable energy option to the responsible energy option. This report points to the fact that utility-scale solar PV provides grid reliability and flexibility services that are even more effective than conventional power plants in some cases, if the project is designed inclusive of advanced plant controls.

    SolarPower Europe anticipates in its Global Market Outlook 2018-2022 a 2-digit market growth in Europe in the coming years. Solar is ready to play a major role in the European Union meeting its 32% renewables target by 2030. In its New Energy Outlook 2018, Bloomberg NEF expects an 87% renewables scenario in 2050 in Europe, with 1,400 GW of solar installed, contributing to around 36% of total power generation. The bulk of solar, over two thirds, is expected to come from utility scale power plants.

    Today’s leading EU solar markets have missed to tap the potential of utility-scale solar so far – tendered solar capacities are usually too small, regulatory frameworks are often inadequate to support the huge demand of corporate power sourcing from large-scale solar. This needs to be fixed to enable the over 1,100% solar capacity growth to 1,400 GW in 2050 forecasted by Bloomberg from 114 GW end of 2017 in Europe.

    In order to prepare for large-scale adoption of solar power, advanced solar markets need to leave the solar 1.0 phase behind, when utility-scale PV plants have mostly been installed with the intention to maximise individual system yields. It is now about solar 2.0 – that’s grid flexible solar PV plants integrated into the energy system.

    With the right market design, utility-scale solar is ready to support Europe’s security of supply, with a stronger accuracy than conventional generation assets – such as coal and gas.

    While solar can already achieve significant grid penetration economically without storage, quickly decreasing stationary battery cost enables the solar 3.0 phase, where storage provides dispatchable solar capacity. The report provides case studies about the first utility-scale solar projects with battery storage that provide ancillary and other grid services.

    Source: SolarPower Europe

    0 6

    SENER, global engineering and technology group, together with its engineering, procurement and construction (EPC) partners, Emvelo and Cobra, announces that the Ilanga-1 Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plant has been completed.

    The EPC partners reached the certificate to initiate commercial operation of the turnkey solar thermal power plant project located at Karoshoek Solar Valley on 30 November 2018. This means the conclusion of construction, commissioning and testing of the 100 MWe Concentrated Solar Power plant. The plant has been handed over to the owner, Karoshoek Solar One (RF) Proprietary Limited. The plant will supply electricity to the national grid through Eskom, the South African electricity public utility.

    “This is a historic moment in South Africa’s energy transition as another renewable energy powerplant that supplies clean, reliable, sustainable and dispatchable energy is successfully completed. We are particularly pleased that it was completed on time, within budget, within the required quality standards, in line with the contracted output performance and within acceptable safety standards. We are also pleased with the level of localization, BBBEE (Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment), skills development and job creation that was achieved on the project. It is a clear indication of what is possible if the CSP industry can be nurtured and allowed to flourish in South Africa. SENER is proud of being a technology provider, engineering subcontractor and member of the EPC contractor on such a special project.” said Siyabonga Mbanjwa, Regional Managing Director for SENER Southern Africa.

    “Ilanga 1 will provide on-demand power to South Africans for the next 20 years, in the same manner as conventional power generation projects. It has no fuel costs nor harmful emissions and has created employment for many people in the area of Upington. Ilanga 1 is an important step in South Africa’s energy future, procuring on-demand power from an efficient and accountable source with no resource risk and a controlled tariff. We as Grupo Cobra look forward to the continued growth of the local energy sector and will continue to provide world class development, construction and operations services to the South African market” said Jose Minguillon, CEO of Cobra South Africa.

    “This is the first CSP plant in the history of the South African Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Program (REIPPPP) that was conceived and developed by a 100% black owned South African entity. This demonstrates that Black Industrialists can lead in the development and execution of large renewable energy infrastructure projects. With a 550MWe pipeline of projects that are shovel ready at Karoshoek Solar Valley, the potential to localize, create jobs and provide business opportunities to new youth and women led SMMEs is colossal and what is required is for government to ensure that CSP remains a part of its energy mix policy and is included in the Draft IRP” said Pancho Ndebele, founder of Emvelo.

    The joint venture between SENER, Cobra and Emvelo was appointed by Karoshoek Solar One (RF) Proprietary Limited to provide engineering, procurement and construction services as well as operation and maintenance for the project. The Ilanga-1 CSP plant, made up of 266 SENERtrough® loops, with approximately 870,000 square metres of curved mirrors, is equipped with a molten salt storage system (SENER proprietary technology) that allows 5 hours of thermal energy storage to extend the operational capacity of the plant to continue producing electricity in absence of solar radiation. This is a unique characteristic of CSP that radically changes the role of renewable sources in the global power supply. SENERtrough® collectors, a parabolic trough technology, are also specifically designed and patented by SENER, aimed at improving the efficiency of the plant.

    In line with government’s four accords, emanating from the New Growth Path (NGP); namely basic education, skills development, local procurement and the green economy, approximately 1,500 jobs were created during the construction phase. Recently, a technical training course for 50 prospective employees at the plant, located in Karoshoek almost 30km east of Upington, were completed and further local socio-economic development was done by the EPC consortium, in the nearby communities located a stones throw away from the plant. It is estimated that Ilanga-1 will supply clean and dispatchable energy to around 100,000 homes and save 90,000 tons of CO2 per year over a period of 20 years.

    Source: SENER

    0 0
    Photo: SolarPOwer Europe

    On 6 November 2018, at the 3rd Meeting of the European Commission’s Platform for Coal and Carbon-Intensive Regions in Transition, SolarPower Europe outlined how solar can help ensure a just energy transition in former coal regions in Europe.

    James Watson, CEO of SolarPower Europe said “Across Europe former coal mines are being transformed into solar farms. This is hugely positive as solar can create new jobs, innovation and investments in these local communities, diversifying their local economies. In fact, a recent Joint Research Centre study
    found solar to be particularly suitable for employing former coal workers and to help drive regional development. It is crucial that no regions or communities are left behind in the energy transition. Solar can play a massive part in ensuring a just transition for all.”

    “Solar is ideal to place on former coal mine sites because the land is often no longer suitable for farming. Moreover, coal mines often leave behind large lakes with high levels of sulfate, these polluted lakes can easily be converted into floating solar farms. Solar presents a huge opportunity for new industry, jobs and as a source of clean, affordable energy in regions affected by the decline of coal. We look forward to working with the European Commission to further explore solar’s role in delivering a just transition in former coal regions,” said Watson.

    Over the past few decades the production and consumption of coal in the EU has been in steady decline, due to the closure of coal mines and the phasing out of coal use for power generation. The Coal Regions in Transition Initiative is designed by the European Commission to help regions reap the benefits of the clean energy transition by bringing more focus to social fairness, better jobs, new skills, structural transformation, and financing for the real economy.

    From coal mines to solar farms

    In 2015, Hungarian power plant company Matrai Eromu, opened a solar power plant in Visonta in Hungary, which is situated on top of a lignite mine dump site and generates 16 megawatts of solar power.

    Other 4-MW solar farm was built on the surface of a former coal mine in Saarland (Grube Warndt). The area was categorized as conversion area, which then was eligible under the German FiT at that time. This project dates back to 2012 and was developed by BayWa r.e.

    Askern Solar Farm developed by Anesco comprises 18,768 solar modules equating to 5 MW. The application site is approximately 14.53 hectares in size and comprises part of the former Askern Colliery site which has a total site area of around 95 hectares

    LRM was the owner of the sludge pond in Heusden-Zolder. When coal was being mined here, this was where rubble and fly ash were dumped. It was very difficult to find a suitable use for this site so LRM decided to transform the decontaminated land into a solar power plant -and so an ostensibly lost site acquired a new use.

    COMEVAL
    ELT
    COFAST-PASCH
    AERZEN
    IMASA