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vehicles

ABB has won a contract from ST Engineering Land Systems Ltd. to deliver and com-mission integrated smart charging points for Automated Guided Vehicles (AGV) in the new Tuas port of Singapore. Deliveries of the vehicles, which will be deployed to transport heavy shipping containers at the port terminal, are scheduled to begin from September 2020 through to August 2022, with the ABB chargers and supporting infra-structure set to be installed towards the end of 2020.

The contract includes 450 kW High Power Chargers, design and supply of charge point prefabricated skid and container solutions with integrated chargers, medium- and low- voltage switchgear, transformers and associated control and monitoring equipment. This integrated solution enables fast installation on site, ensures the highest levels of operability and mitigates risk.

The future port is a major milestone in Singapore’s next generation container terminal development with an annual capacity of 65 M containers (TEU) and is slated to be the largest port in the world by the time it is complete in 2040. The first berth will be op-erational in 2021.

The breakthrough project marks the first time ABB’s chargers will be used to power a fleet of autonomous vehicles for commercial operation. A specially designed and cus-tomized connection to the chargers will be enabled for end-to-end integration with the fully-electric AGVs.

On 17 April 2019, the European Parliament and Council adopted Regulation (EU) 2019/631 introducing CO2 emission standards for new passenger cars and light commercial vehicles in the EU. This regulation set reduction targets of -15% and -37.5% for the tailpipe CO2 emissions of newly-registered passenger cars for the years 2025 and 2030 respectively. In 2023, the European Commission will review the Regulation, reporting back to the European Parliament and Council on the progress made towards reaching the car CO2 targets. Amongst other things, this ‘mid-term review’ will take stock of the roll-out of charging and refuelling infrastructure for alternatively-powered vehicles, their market uptake, as well as CO2 reductions from the car fleet.

Now, the European Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (ACEA) has published the report “Making the Transition to Zero-Emission Mobility“, that tracks the availability of infrastructure and incentives, ahead of the review of the CO2 targets by the European Commission in 2023. According to the report, sales of alternatively-powered passenger cars – including electrically-chargeable, hybrid, fuel cell and natural gas-powered vehicles – will have to pick up strongly if the targets are to be achieved. To stimulate these sales, governments across the EU need to ramp up investments in charging and refuelling infrastructure, and to put in place meaningful purchase incentives for consumers (such as bonus payments and premiums).

ACEA’s report shows that in 2018 there were less than 145,000 charging points for electrically-chargeable vehicles (ECVs) available throughout the entire European Union. Although this is three times more than five years ago, it still falls far short of the at least 2.8 million charging points that will be required by 2030, which translates into a 20-fold increase in the next decade.

But it is not only the overall lack of infrastructure that poses a problem, it is also the huge imbalance in its distribution across the EU. Indeed, four countries covering roughly one quarter of the EU’s total surface area – the Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK – account for more than 75% of all ECV charging points.

In addition, there is a clear link between the market uptake of ECVs and the number of charging points per 100km of road: almost all EU countries with less than 1 charging point per 100 km of road also have an ECV market share of under 1%.

Another major issue is affordability. The new ACEA data shows that the market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles is also directly correlated to a country’s standard of living. All EU member states with an ECV market share that is less than 1% have a GDP per capita below €29,000. That includes many countries in Central and Eastern Europe, but also Greece, Italy and Spain.

Key findings

Market uptake of alternatively-powered cars

  • 2% of all cars sold in 2018 were electrically-chargeable (+1.4 percentage points since 2014).
  • 3.8% of new passenger cars in the EU were hybrid electric last year (+2.4 percentage points over the last five years).
  • 0.4% of all cars sold in 2018 were natural gas-powered (-0.4 percentage points since 2014).
  • Fuel cell vehicles currently account for a negligible share of total EU car sales.

CO2 emissions of new passenger cars

  • In 2017, petrol cars became the most sold type in the EU for the first time since 2009.
  • 2017 also marked the first increase (+0.3%) in CO2 from new cars since records began.
  • 2018 saw an even bigger drop in diesel sales, and a stronger surge in demand for petrol, resulting in a 1.8% increase of new-car CO2 emissions.

Affordability

  • The market uptake of electrically-chargeable vehicles (ECVs) is directly correlated to a country’s GDP per capita, showing that affordability is a major barrier to consumers.
  • All countries with an ECV market share of less than 1% have a GDP below €29,000, including EU member states in Central and Eastern Europe, but also Spain, Italy and Greece.
  • An ECV share of above 3.5% only occurs in countries with a GDP of more than €42,000.
  • Only 12 EU countries offer bonus payments or premiums to buyers of ECVs. These purchase incentives, and especially their monetary value, differ greatly across the European Union.
  • Expanding the scope to also include tax exemptions and reductions (ie related to acquisition and ownership), four member states do not offer any tax benefits or incentives for ECVs at all.

Infrastructure availability

  • Although there has been a strong growth in the deployment of ECV infrastructure, the total number of charging points available across the EU (144,000) falls far short of what is required.
  • According to conservative estimates by the European Commission, at least 2.8 million charging points will be needed by 2030. That is a 20-fold increase within the next 12 years.
  • Four countries covering 27% of the EU’s total surface area – the Netherlands, Germany, France and the UK – account for 76% of all ECV charging points in the EU.
  • Almost all EU member states with less than 1 charging point per 100 km of road have an ECV market share of under 1%.
  • There were just 47 hydrogen filling stations available across 11 EU countries in 2018.
  • 17 member states did not have a single hydrogen filling station.
  • There are some 3,400 natural gas filling stations in the EU, up 17.5% since 2014.
  • Two-thirds of these filling points are concentrated in two countries (Italy and Germany).

Source: ACEA

Ignacio Galán in a electric Iberdrola car

Iberdrola, a world leading renewable energy company, has further enhanced its sustainable ambitions by becoming the first Spanish company to sign up to The Climate Group´s EV100 initiative.

EV100 is a global initiative bringing together forward-looking companies committed to accelerating the transition to electric vehicles (EVs) and making electric transport the new normal by 2030.

Under the agreement, sealed within the framework of the Climate Week NYC, Iberdrola will fully electrify its vehicle fleet and provide charging for staff across its operations in Spain and UK- where local EV market conditions make this possible- by 2030.

Iberdrola will also aspire towards this objective in Brazil, Mexico and the USA, but this will be reliant on national characteristics and further developments in the wider EV markets in each of these countries. As part of the partnership, Iberdrola will work with The Climate Group to engage key stakeholders in these countries to help overcome barriers.

A fleet of more than fleet of more than 3,500 vehicles across Spain and UK

This initiative will see Iberdrola have a fleet of more than 3,500 vehicles completely electrified in these two countries by 2030.

Light passenger cars and vans are included, as well as off-road vehicles used for windfarms and power line maintenance tasks like SUVs, pickup trucks and man basket cranes.

Iberdrola has already committed to installing up to 16.000 charging points at homes and 9.000 at workplaces in Spain by 2021. Beyond that, the company´s Smart mobility program for customers is increasing in popularity, which includes both the provision of a charging point and a special tariff to charge vehicles with green electricity.

In the UK, ScottishPower was the first energy company to offer and end-to-end EV ownership package for customers. Working with major car retailer Arnold Clark, buyers can purchase or lease an EV of their choice, book a home charging point installation and sign up to a smart 100% renewable electricity tariff as part of the same package.

In the US, Iberdrola´s subsidiary Avangrid just recently announced the expansion of its partnership with Nissan North America, seeking to provide 3.2 M customers and employees across New York, New England and Oregon with a 5,000 $ discount on the purchase of a Nissan LEAF EV. In addition, the company is also delivering a 34 M$ investment in the expansion of EV charging infrastructure across Maine and New York.

Source: Iberdrola

Enagás, with its subsidiary Enagás Emprende, Toyota España and Urbaser signed an agreement to carry out a pioneering project in Spain that will involve the installation of a hydrogen refuelling station for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and the commissioning of the first fleet of 12 Toyota Mirai units based in Madrid.

Hydrogen is the new energy vector that offers countless possibilities for energy consumption, storage and mobility. It is a viable, clean and sustainable alternative to traditional energy sources. These companies are committed to sustainable mobility, promoting its use in zero-emission vehicles.

The Toyota Mirai is a 100% fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle (FCHEV), powered by electricity produced by the chemical reaction between oxygen (taken from external air) and hydrogen stored in its tanks. It has an output of 155 HP with a range of more than 500 km (NEDC) and can be refuelled in under five minutes, offering a performance equivalent to a conventional vehicle. With water vapour being its only emission, it is a zero-emissions vehicle.

The agreement was signed by Marcelino Oreja (CEO of Enagás), Fernando Impuesto (General Manager of Enagás Emprende), José María López Piñol (CEO of Urbaser) and Miguel Carsi, President and CEO of Toyota Spain.

The hydrogen refuelling station will be located in the San Antonio S.L. service station, Avenida de Manoteras 34, Madrid, and will serve the companies taking part in the project.

According to Marcelino Oreja, CEO of Enagás, “Thanks to various projects, the company is a driving force in developing non-electric renewable energies, such as hydrogen and biomethane, as new solutions in the ecological transition process and in promoting a circular economy”. Regarding this pioneering initiative in Spain, he points out that “the companies that promote it are committed to new sustainable transport alternatives to improve air quality”.

Source: Enagás

FuturENERGY Dec. 18 - Jan. 2019

Along with artificial intelligence, new methods of payment, IT convergence and e-commerce, the industrial transformation is one of the five technological changes that will have the greatest economic impact on the world over the coming years. As part of that industrial transformation, automotion is witnessing a process of technological and services revolution as regards road mobility which is going to transform a sector that, despite slight adaptations and regardless of its growth, has been working at the same pace for over a century….By Arturo Pérez de Lucia, Managing Director of AEDIVE, the Business Association for the Boosting and Development of the EV Market.

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