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Vestas has received a 30 MW order for a wind project in Mexico. The contract includes the supply and installation of 15 V120-2.0 MW wind turbines as well as an Active Output Management 5000 (AOM 5000) service agreement for the operation and maintenance of the wind park over the next 20 years.

This order exemplifies the reliability of Vestas’ portfolio and our ability to ensure optimsed performance for the lifetime of the project”, says Agustín Sánchez-Tembleque, General Manager of Vestas México.

Turbine delivery is expected by the fourth quarter of 2020 whilst commissioning is planned by the second quarter of 2021.

Vestas pioneered the Mexican wind energy market in 1994, when it erected the country’s first commercial wind turbine. Since then, Vestas has accumulated over 2.3 GW of installed capacity or under construction in Mexico.

The project and customer are undisclosed.

Sourcer: Vestas

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Parque Eólico Cavar (Navarra) / Cavar wind farm (Navarra)

The European Investment Bank (EIB) has taken another step forward in the promotion of clean energy production in Spain. The EU bank will provide EUR 50m in financing to Renovables de la Ribera, a 50-50 joint venture between Iberdrola and Caja Rural de Navarra to build a new renewable energy project – the Cavar wind complex – in Navarra, Spain.

The EIB is assisting this project via a Green Loan, the features of which are fully in line with the requirements set out in its Climate Awareness Bonds programme. As a result, it is likely to be allocated to its portfolio of loan operations financed via the issuance of these bonds.
The new project, located between the municipalities of Cadreita and Valtierra, includes four wind farms and will have an installed capacity of 111 MW. Construction will enable the creation of up to 200 jobs and the complex is expected to become operational in the first quarter of 2020.

In this way, the EU bank financing provided to Renovables de la Ribera will help meet the goal proposed by the European Commission of generating 32% of the energy used in the EU using renewable sources by 2030. The new wind complex – which will not release any polluting emissions – will generate enough clean energy to meet the electricity needs of 46 500 people and will avoid the release 84 000 tonnes of CO2 into the atmosphere a year.

Cavar is also the first wind project in Spain to sell its energy to a large corporation. A long-term bilateral contract (a Power Purchase Agreement or PPA) will see it produce 40 MW of clean energy for Nike in Europe.

The EIB and climate action

On 14 November, the EIB Board of Directors approved its new climate objectives and the new energy lending policy. The Bank will gradually increase its financing for climate and environmental objectives up to 50% by 2025, with the goal of ensuring that the EIB Group mobilises at least EUR 1bn by 2030 to promote investments helping to meet these objectives. It also announced its intention to align all EIB Group activities with the Paris Agreement. To this end, the EIB will cease financing fossil fuel-based projects from late 2021.

In 2018, the EIB provided almost EUR 1.3bn to support climate action in Spain by financing projects involving the development of cleaner means of transport and implementation of new, less polluting and more environmentally friendly production processes.

Source: Iberdrola

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The EU Commission’s big goals for offshore wind – between 230 and 450 GW by 2050 – are achievable provided the right investments in electricity grids and Governments take the right approach to maritime spatial planning. That’s the conclusion of a new WindEurope report ‘Our energy, our future’ released at Offshore 2019 in Copenhagen. The report is a remit from the Energy Ministers of the 10 ‘North Seas’ countries who coordinate their work on offshore wind with each other and the Commission.

The report examines where 450 GW of offshore wind could be deployed most cost-effectively around Europe, bearing in mind there is only 20 GW today. 450 GW of offshore wind is part of a European Commission scenario to deliver climate neutrality by 2050.

The report concludes that 212 GW should be deployed in the North Sea, 85 GW in the Atlantic (including the Irish Sea), 83 GW in the Baltic, and 70 GW in the Mediterranean and other Southern European waters. This reflects the relative wind resources, proximity to energy demand and the location of the supply chain. The report also breaks down how would each country would deploy in an optimal scenario. The 380 GW that would deployed in Northern European waters would require less than 3% of the total space there.

The report considers how much it would cost to build these large volumes of offshore wind. It shows how maritime spatial planning is key to minimise costs. In at least 60% of the North Seas it is not possible to build offshore wind farms today.

These “exclusion zones” exist either for environmental reasons or because space is set aside for fishing, shipping and military activity. They mean we can only build less than a quarter of the required volumes at very low cost – below €50/MWh. But with a different approach to maritime spatial planning, with climate change at its heart, we could build much more at these prices – and benefit fully from the spectacular cost reductions achieved in recent years. Multiple use, e.g. allowing certain types of fishing in offshore wind farms, would really help.

Building 450 GW offshore wind by 2050 requires Europe to install over 20 GW a year by 2030 compared to 3 GW today. The industry is gearing up for this, but it’s crucial that Governments provide visibility on volumes and revenue schemes to give long-term confidence for the necessary investments.

Governments should also anticipate this significant growth in offshore wind in their planning for both offshore and onshore grid connections. Not least since there is a 10-year lead time on planning and building the grids needed for offshore wind. Offshore grid investments will need to rise from less than €2bn in 2020 to up €8bn a year by 2030.

Europe also needs to provide a regulatory framework for offshore wind farms that have grid connections to more than one country. These “hybrid” projects will enable us to pool assets and infrastructure and reduce costs.

Capital expenditure on offshore wind including grids will need to rise from around €6bn a year in 2020 to €23bn by 2030 and thereafter up to €45bn.

Source: WindEurope

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Ingeteam, an independent global supplier of electrical conversion and turbine control equipment, has reached 1 GW of production output within the first year of operations at its production facility in India. The company, which recently expanded this new facility, continues to implement its growth plans in the Indian wind power sector.

Ingeteam established its new cutting-edge Indian facility in autumn last year in the vicinity of Chennai to satisfy the demand for wind power converters and control cabinets from both local and international OEMs. In response to positive trends in both the domestic and global markets, the 3,500 m² production facility has recently been expanded by 40% to reach 4,900 m². Similarly, Ingeteam has tripled the staff headcount to reach 82 employees, and introduced three additional products to its local production range in the past year.

Ingeteam’s Chennai wind facility has been built on a modular design, which allows to rapidly ramp production up or down according to ever-changing market conditions. This flexibility plays a big role in ensuring that this production centre remains both highly efficient and cost-effective.

In 2018, Ingeteam’s technology was deployed on 15% of the newly added wind capacity in India and will reach 1GW of production output by this month.

Ingeteam is the world number one independent converter supplier for wind applications, with more than 45GW installed capacity to date. The company, which has a strong focus on emerging markets, entered the Indian solar PV sector in 2013, with a central office in Delhi. In 2016, Ingeteam experienced significant activity in the wind energy industry. Just two years later, Ingeteam was one of the first global industrial groups to massively invest in the then burgeoning Indian wind energy sector with its new factory in Chennai. This early commitment paid off, as the company has since managed to establish itself as the leading supplier of wind power converters in the country.

Source: Ingeteam

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Este mapa muestra la tecnología con el LCOE de referencia más bajo en cada mercado, excluyendo subsidios o créditos fiscales. CCGT: turbina de gas en ciclo combinado / This map shows the technology with the lowest benchmark LCOE in each market, excluding subsidies or tax credits. CCGT: Combined-cycle gas turbine. Fuente/Source: BloombergNEF.

Every half year, BloombergNEF runs its Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) Update, a worldwide assessment of the cost-competitiveness of different power generating and energy storage technologies – excluding subsidies. BNEF latest Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) figures show a global benchmark LCOE for onshore wind and PV projects at $47 and $51/MWh. The numbers are down 6% and 11% respectively from six months ago, mainly owing to cheaper equipment. The offshore wind LCOE benchmark sits at $78/MWh down 32% from from last year.

These are the key, high-level results for the second half of 2019:

New solar and onshore wind power plants have now reached parity with average wholesale prices in California and parts of Europe. In China, their levelized costs are now below the average regulated coal power price, the reference price tag in the country. These technologies are winning the race as the cheapest sources of new generation with two-thirds of the global population living in countries where PV or wind are cheaper than coal and gas power plants.

BNEF’s global benchmark levelized cost figures for onshore wind and PV projects financed in the last six months are at $47 and $51/MWh, down 6% and 11% respectively compared to the first half of 2019. For wind this is mainly due the fall in the price of wind turbines, 7% lower on average globally compared to the end of 2018. In China, the world’s largest solar market, the capex of utility-scale PV plants has dropped 11% in the last six months, reaching $0.57 million per MW. Weak demand for new plants in China has left developers and engineering, procurement and construction firms eager for business, and this has put pressure on capex.

BNEF estimates that some of the cheapest PV projects financed recently will be able to achieve an LCOE of $27-36/MWh, assuming competitive returns for their equity investors. Those can be found in India, Chile and Australia. Best-in-class onshore wind farms in Brazil, India, Mexico and Texas can reach levelized costs as low as $26-31/MWh already.

Offshore wind has seen the fastest cost declines, down 32% from just a year ago and 12% compared to the first half of 2019. BNEF’s current global benchmark LCOE estimate is $78/MWh. New offshore wind projects throughout Europe now deploy turbines with power ratings up to 10 MW, unlocking capex and opex savings. In Denmark and the Netherlands, we expect the most recent projects financed to achieve $53-64/MWh excluding transmission.

Source: BNEF

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Foto cortesía de/Photo courtesy of: GWEC

Europe wind technology contracts in Q2 2019 saw 118 contracts announced, marking a rise of 9% over the last four-quarter average of 108, according to GlobalData’s power industry contracts database.

Onshore was the top category in wind technology in terms of number of contracts for the quarter in Europe, accounting for 80 contracts and a 67.8% share, followed by offshore with 34 contracts and a 28.8% share. Onshore repowered stood in third place with four contracts and a 3.4% share.

The proportion of wind technology contracts by category tracked by GlobalData in the quarter was as follows:

1. Project implementation with 41 contracts and a 34.7% share
2. Supply & erection: 35 contracts and a 29.7% share
3. Power Purchase Agreement: 16 contracts and a 13.6% share
4. Repair, maintenance, upgrade & others: 15 contracts and a 12.7% share
5. Consulting & similar services: seven contracts and a 5.9% share
6. Electricity supply: four contracts and a 3.4% share.

France tops Europe wind power contracts activity

France was the top country in the Europe region for wind technology contracts recorded in Q2 2019 with 28 contracts and a 23.7% share, followed by Germany with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share and the UK with 15 contracts and a 12.7% share.

The top issuers of contracts for the quarter in terms of power capacity involved in Europe were:

1. Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, Turkey (Turkey): 1,000 MW from two contracts
2. Ministere de la transition ecologique et solidaire (France): 600 MW from one contract
3. Ministere de l’Environnement, de l’Energie et de la Mer (France): 516.5 MW capacity from 21 contracts.

The top winners were:

1. EDF Renewables (France), Enbridge (Canada) and Innogy (Germany): 600 MW.
2. Enercon (Germany) and Enerjisa Enerji (Turkey): 500 MW.
3. Aquila Capital Concepts (Germany): 133.2 MW.

Source: GlobalData

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CoreMarine and CENER (National Renewable Energy Centre of Spain) have signedof a consortium agreement to promote engineering services to the floating offshore wind industry. This collaboration will combine their expertise in a one-stop shop for the development of floating wind projects.The combined offering will support projects from research and FEED studies, to simulation of components, detailed engineering and installation support.

Specifically, the agreement focuses on floating foundation design, mooring and dynamic cable analysis, transport & installation, wind turbine modelling, coupled analysis and scale model testing. Both entities have recognized the need to address the specific concerns and needs of the emerging floating wind industry.

As far as we can see, this is the first offering to the floating wind market from front end engineering and model testing through to detailed design and installation. This is a first for the industry and represents a significant strengthening of our capabilities in the floating wind sector”, says Carlos Lopez, director of CoreMarine Spain.

Additionally, Antonio Ugarte, director for the Wind Energy Department at CENER, comments: “Currently it is necessary to implement the latest tools for simulating wind components and validation tests in industrial processes. The alliance between CoreMarine and CENER makes it possible to combine precisely the engineering processes with the most advanced methods for the design, construction, transport and installation of innovative solutions for offshore wind energy”.

Over recent years both CoreMarine and CENER have made their commitment to floating offshore wind and have gained extensive know-how and experience in the engineering, design and validation of floating structures. This agreement solidifies and strengthens the commitment of both entities and provides added value to this emerging industry.

Source: CENER

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Foundation of a wind turbine

GES, an integral supplier of engineering, construction and maintenance for renewable energy projects (wind, solar and hydroelectric) will build the Valdejalón wind portfolio consisting of 5 wind farms in Aragón, Spain. Once completed, the wind farms will have a total installed capacity of 231 MW. Construction is expected to be finalized in 2020 second quarter.

The project is divided into two phases: Valdejalón East which includes the wind farms El Cabezo (49 MW) and Portillo II Phase I (45.6 MW) and Phase II (38 MW), and Valdejalón West composed of Virgen de Rodanas I (49.4 MW) and Virgen de Rodanas II (49.4 MW).

The Valdejalón portfolio is fully owned by the Danish fund manager Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners P/S (CIP) through its fund Copenhagen Infrastructure III K/S (CI-III). CIP is a fund management company focused on energy infrastructure including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar PV, biomass and energy-from-waste, transmission and distribution, and other energy assets like reserve capacity and storage. The company operates in Europe, North America and Southeast Asia.

GES is responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction of the project. The company is already working in the detail engineering, and will be in charge of the complete BOP (Balance of Plant), both the civil work, with more than 60 km of roads and 61 foundations and platforms for the 85 m wind turbines to be installed in the park; and the electrical work, including the underground medium voltage network with more than 55 km of trenches and the 132 kV evacuation line of almost another 50 km, which will connect the two new substations to an existing interconnection substation.

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Iberdrola continues to move forward with its renewables strategy in Spain with four new photovoltaic projects, with an installed capacity of 250 megawatts (MW), already submitted for official approval in Castilla-La Mancha, as stated in the Official State Gazette (BOE) and the Official Journals of the Castilla-La Mancha regional government.

Two of the projects, Romeral and Olmedilla, each with a capacity of 50 MW, are located in Cuenca province, in the towns of Uclés and Valverdejo, respectively. In Toledo province, Iberdrola is planning the Barcience photovoltaic plant (50 MW) in Bargas; and in Ciudad Real province, it will develop a unique project in the municipality of Puertollano, with a capacity of 100 MW.

Puertollano II combines several innovative elements, both in the technology used and the storage capacity of this renewable project:

  • The installation will have bifacial panels, which will allow for greater production, as they have two light-sensitive surfaces, providing a longer service life;
  • The plant has been designed with daisy-chained inverters to improve performance and permit greater use of the surface area;
  • The project will have a storage system that will make the plant more manageable and optimise the control strategies. The battery system (with a power of 5 MW) will have a storage capacity of 20 MWh.
  • The start of the development of these projects increases the MW that Iberdrola has under construction and awaiting approval in Spain to more than 2,200: 75% of the capacity the company plans to install by 2022.

Plan to relaunch clean energy in Spain

These actions are part of the company’s commitment to strengthening its investment in clean energy generation in Spain, with the installation of 3,000 new MW up to 2022, 52% more than its current wind and solar capacity. Up to 2030, the forecasts point to the installation of 10,000 new MW. The plan will create jobs for 20,000 people.

Iberdrola is committed to leading the transition towards a completely carbon-free economy by promoting renewable energies and speeding up its investment in Spain, where it intends to spend 8.000 M€ between 2018 and 2022.

Iberdrola is the most prolific producer of wind power in Spain, with an installed capacity of 5,770 MW, while its total installed renewable capacity, including both wind and hydroelectric power, is 15,828 MW. The company operates renewables with a capacity of 2,229 MW in Castilla-La Mancha, mainly wind power, making it the autonomous region with the second highest total of ‘green’ MW installed by Iberdrola.

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GWEC Market Intelligence has released its updated market outlook concluding that an additional 330 GW of wind energy capacity will be installed from 2019 to 2023, an increase of 9 GW from its market outlook published in Q1 2019. Main markets driving this volume increase are the US and Chinese onshore markets, which will both experience an installation boom over the next two years with 6.5 GW and 10 GW added capacity respectively from the Q1 2019 market outlook. The growing role of offshore wind in the global energy transition is a major reason for boosting overall growth, and will make up approximately 18% of total wind energy capacity by 2023, up from 9% in 2018. The continued growth of wind energy globally will be driven by the increasing cost competiveness of wind energy as well as market-based mechanisms such as auctions, tenders, and bilateral PPAs.

According to the updated market outlook released by GWEC Market Intelligence, an additional 330GW of new wind energy capacity will be added to the global energy market from 2019 to 2023, bringing total capacity to over 900 GW. The outlook has been increased by additional 9 GW from the outlook published in Q1 2019 in GWEC’s annual Global Wind Report.

From 2019 to 2023, the global wind energy market will grow at an annual rate of 4%, reaching a total capacity of over 900 GW by 2023. This growth rate means that an average of approximately an additional 14 GW will be added each year globally over the next five years compared to 2018 growth levels.

Through analysis of the developments of wind markets across the world, two main trends have been identified that will drive growth beyond 2023; the increasing share of so-called subsidy-free projects, and an increasing number of bilateral PPAs. Together, these two mechanisms will contribute to the cost competitiveness of wind energy and provide assurance for large-scale project development and the continued growth of wind energy globally.

Although there was a decrease in the outlook for India and Germany due to their challenging market conditions including the execution of their auctioned capacity, the growth in other markets more than make up for this deficit. With China going subsidy free by 2021 for onshore wind and the Production Tax Credit phasing out in the US, there will be an installation rush over the next two years in these two leading onshore markets.

The forecasts for emerging markets in Latin America, South East Asia, Africa and the Middle East have all been increased as well due to positive market developments. Additionally, it must be acknowledged the importance of offshore wind for driving growth, as it is set to take off globally over the next few years with a compound annual growth rate of 8% between 2019 and 2023, double that of onshore wind.

Wind energy is now one of the most cost-competitive energy sources available, so it is no surprise we will continue to see volume growth as global energy demand continues to increase. On average, 60 GW of onshore wind and 8-10 GW of offshore wind will be added worldwide until 2023. Even when not considering the two key growth markets of US and China, it will still be seen installation growth levels similar to those of the 2009-2010 wind energy boom in the other markets and regions. Although this outlook is very positive, it is not enough to meet the renewable energy targets needed to keep global warming under 1.5 C°.

Total new installations by year for onshore and offshore wind

2018: 50.12 GW
2019: 71.97 GW
2020: 76.43 GW
2021: 61.32 GW
2022: 62.02 GW
2023: 61.83 GW

Changes by region from Q1 2019 (onshore only)

North America: +6.5 GW
Latin America: +2 GW
Europe: -5.9 GW
Africa and the Middle East: +0.8 GW
Asia Pacific: +5.7 GW

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