Tags Posts tagged with "wind power"

wind power

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Enel Green Power España has connected up the Refurbished Pena Ventosa wind farm with its 35 MW to the network, which has meant an investment of 35.5 M euros.

EGPE was awarded 540 MW of wind power and 339 MW of solar energy at the government auctions held in May 2017, with a total investment of more than 800 M euros. With the connection of this park, Endesa completes all the power allocated to the company in the 2017 Government auctions.
The Los Arcos wind farm, which has 10 wind turbines of 3.5 MW of unit power, will have the capacity to generate more than 100 GW/h per year, which will prevent the annual emission into the atmosphere of approximately 66,500 t of CO 2 .

Enel Green Power Spain has 12 wind farms in Andalusia: 5 in the province of Cádiz , another 5 in Malaga, one in Almería and one in Granada.

This renewable capacity is in line with Endesa’s strategy of decarbonising its generation mix by 2050. To achieve this, the first milestone of the latest Strategic Plan (2020-2022) will be to reach 10.2 GW of renewable installed capacity by 2022, compared with the 7.4 GW estimated for the end of 2019, with a total investment of about €3.8 billion.

Endesa follows a facility development model that encompasses actions to create social value for the environments in which they are built, the so-called Creating Shared Value (CSV) model. Specifically, the project’s CSV actions have prioritised the incorporation of local labour, as well as locally hiring catering services and workers’ accommodation.

Specifically, in this plant, in which 125 people have worked, the solar panels of the work have been donated to the community for community use, and a painting contest has been organized, among other things. The total investment destined to these shared value creation plans for the local communities located around this park amounts to more than 112,000 euros.

Mix de generación de España en el escenario base. Fuente: BloombergNEF. Nota: El gráfico muestra una proyección para España peninsular (continental) y no incluye las islas españolas / Spain’s generation mix in the base scenario. Source: BloombergNEF. Note: The chart shows a projection for peninsular (mainland) Spain, and does not include Spanish islands

Maximizing the role of solar and wind power in the electricity systems of Spain and Chile between now and 2050 will hinge on the extent to which flexibility assets such as batteries and dynamic electric vehicle chargers are deployed and used. That is the conclusion of twin reports, published by BloombergNEF (BNEF) in partnership with Acciona.

Both Spain and Chile have world-class resources in sunshine and wind, and are therefore prime locations for the build-out of renewable energy over the next three decades. The BNEF reports model the outlook for the power generation mix of the two countries by 2050, based on various scenarios. Both Spain and Chile have ambitious targets for decarbonizing their electricity systems, the former for renewable generation, and the latter for the retirement of its entire coal-fired power station fleet. But attaining these, or getting close, will require a focus on flexibility, as well as simply pouring money into increasingly cheap renewables.

Flexibility is provided by technologies that can rapidly increase or reduce the amount of electricity they deliver to the grid, depending on the balance between supply from generators and demand from businesses and consumers. Examples are stationary storage batteries, EV chargers that charge when electric prices are low rather than at peak periods, interconnectors to other countries, and – on the fossil fuel side – quick-response gas-fired power stations.

Among the conclusions of the two reports are:

• The base-case scenario for Spain shows wind and solar generating 51% of total electricity by 2030, and as much as 75% by 2050, thanks to the fact that they are the lowest-cost options in that country for generating power.
• The base-case scenario for Chile shows wind and solar surging from supplying 13% of the country’s electricity now, to 40% by 2030, and 67% by 2050. The market is expected to be 93% supplied by all renewables in that year. In a coal phase-out scenario, the figure rises to 98%.
• In Spain, in a scenario in which battery storage costs fall more rapidly than expected, the electricity system could need 13% less gas back-up capacity by 2050, have 12% fewer emissions, and accommodate up to 94% zero-carbon generation.
• In Spain, in a scenario in which EVs are able to charge flexibly (to take advantage of hours of cheaper electricity), the added costs to the energy system of electrifying transport can be halved. It would also lead to 9% fewer emissions than in the base-case scenario.
• An increase in interconnector capacity between Spain and France would enable the share of zero-carbon electricity to be increased relative to the base-case, and at slightly lower overall cost. However, the benefits are less obvious in the long-term as the interconnector utilization drops due to wind and solar over-generating more often in both countries simultaneously.
• However, another scenario in which storage costs fail to come down as sharply as expected, would lead to 11% more emissions by 2050, and 3% higher system costs, than in the base case.
• In Chile, wind and solar represent a $35 billion investment opportunity between now and 2050, and batteries an $8 billion opportunity.
• In Chile, coal makes up 39% of electricity generation today and this is set to slide all the way to 6% in the base-case scenario, as it loses ground to cheaper wind and solar projects.
• To cut coal-fired generation further, and minimize Chile’s emissions, would require deliberate government policy and 25% more investment in new generation than in the base case.

Source: BNEF

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Ingeteam, an independent global supplier of electrical conversion and turbine control equipment, has reached 1 GW of production output within the first year of operations at its production facility in India. The company, which recently expanded this new facility, continues to implement its growth plans in the Indian wind power sector.

Ingeteam established its new cutting-edge Indian facility in autumn last year in the vicinity of Chennai to satisfy the demand for wind power converters and control cabinets from both local and international OEMs. In response to positive trends in both the domestic and global markets, the 3,500 m² production facility has recently been expanded by 40% to reach 4,900 m². Similarly, Ingeteam has tripled the staff headcount to reach 82 employees, and introduced three additional products to its local production range in the past year.

Ingeteam’s Chennai wind facility has been built on a modular design, which allows to rapidly ramp production up or down according to ever-changing market conditions. This flexibility plays a big role in ensuring that this production centre remains both highly efficient and cost-effective.

In 2018, Ingeteam’s technology was deployed on 15% of the newly added wind capacity in India and will reach 1GW of production output by this month.

Ingeteam is the world number one independent converter supplier for wind applications, with more than 45GW installed capacity to date. The company, which has a strong focus on emerging markets, entered the Indian solar PV sector in 2013, with a central office in Delhi. In 2016, Ingeteam experienced significant activity in the wind energy industry. Just two years later, Ingeteam was one of the first global industrial groups to massively invest in the then burgeoning Indian wind energy sector with its new factory in Chennai. This early commitment paid off, as the company has since managed to establish itself as the leading supplier of wind power converters in the country.

Source: Ingeteam

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The energy transition requires more than 10 times solar and 5 times wind power in combination with other technology measures to limit global warming to well below 2°C and meet the targets of the Paris Agreement, according to DNV GL’s latest Energy Transition Outlook: Power Supply and Use report. The report finds that the energy transition is gathering pace more quickly than previously thought but the rate is still too slow to limit global temperatures rising by well below 2°C as set out in the Paris Agreement.

At the projected pace, DNV GL’s forecast indicates a world that is most likely to be 2.4°C warmer at the end of this century than in the immediate pre-industrial period. The technology already exists to curb emissions enough to hit the climate target. What is needed to ensure this happens are far-reaching policy decisions.

DNV GL recommends that the following technology measures are put in place to help close the emissions gap, the difference between the forecasted rate at which our energy system is decarbonizing and the pace we need to reach, to limit global warming to well below 2°C as set out by the Paris Agreement.

This combination of measures includes:

  1. Grow solar power by more than ten times to 5 TW and wind by 5 times to 3TW by 2030, which would meet 50% of the global electricity use per year.
  2. 50-fold increase in production of batteries for the 50 M electric vehicles needed per year by 2030, alongside investments in new technology to store excess electric energy and solutions that allow our electricity grids to cope with the growing influx of solar and wind power.
  3. Create new infrastructure for charging electric vehicles on a large scale.
  4. More than 1.5 MM$ of annual investment needed for the expansion and reinforcement of power grids by 2030, including ultra-high-voltage transmission networks and extensive demand-response solutions to balance variable wind and solar power.
  5. Increase global energy efficiency improvements by 3.5% per year within the next decade.
  6. Green hydrogen to heat buildings and industry, fuel transport and make use of excess renewable energy in the power grid.
  7. For the heavy industry sector: increased electrification of manufacturing processes, including electrical heating. Onsite renewable sources combined with storage solutions.
  8. Heat-pump technologies and improved insulation.
  9. Massive rail expansion both for city commuting and long-distance passenger and cargo transport.
  10. Rapid and wide deployment of carbon capture, utilization and storage installations.

The staggering pace of the energy transition continues. DNV GL’s report forecasts that by 2050 power generation from solar photovoltaic and wind energy will be 36,000 terawatt hours per year, more than 20 times today’s output. Greater China and India will have the largest share of solar energy by mid-century, with a 40% share of global installed PV capacity in China, followed by the Indian Subcontinent at 17%.

Globally, renewable energy will provide almost 80% of the world’s electricity by 2050 according to the report. The electrification will see increasing use of heat pumps, electric arc furnaces and an electric vehicle revolution, with 50% of all new cars sold in 2032 being electric vehicles.

Despite this rapid pace, the energy transition is not fast enough. DNV GL’s forecast indicates that, alarmingly, for a 1.5°C warming limit, the remaining carbon budget will be exhausted as early as 2028, with an overshoot of 770 Gt CO2 in 2050.

The report also demonstrates that the energy transition is affordable, the world will spend an ever-smaller share of GDP on energy. Global expenditure on energy is currently 3.6% of GDP but that will fall to 1.9% by 2050. This is due to the plunging costs of renewables and other efficiencies, allowing for greater investment to accelerate the transition.

DNV GL appeals to all 197 countries that signed the Paris Agreement to raise and realize increased ambitions for their updated Nationally Determined Contributions by 2020. In a snapshot of the first NDCs submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change secretariat, 75% currently refer to renewable energy, and 58% to energy efficiency. DNV GL calls on political leaders that both these percentages need to be 100% in the second NDCs.

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Last Friday, Septemeber, 20, Google announced its biggest corporate purchase of renewable energy in history. This purchase is made up of a 1,600-MW package of agreements and includes 18 new energy deals. Together, these deals will increase Google’s worldwide portfolio of wind and solar agreements by more than 40 percent, to 5,500 MW—equivalent to the capacity of a million solar rooftops. Once all these projects come online, the company’s carbon-free energy portfolio will produce more electricity than places like Washington D.C. or entire countries like Lithuania or Uruguay use each year.

These agreements will also spur the construction of more than $2 billion in new energy infrastructure, including millions of PV modules and hundreds of wind turbines spread across three continents. In all, Google’s renewable energy fleet now stands at 52 projects, driving more than $7 billion in new construction and thousands of related jobs.

To ensure maximum impact, all of these latest deals meet the rigorous “additionality” criteria Google sets out long ago for its energy purchases. This means not only buying power from existing wind and solar farms but instead making long-term purchase commitments that result in the development of new projects. Bringing incremental renewable energy to the grids where the company consumes energy is a critical component of pursuing 24×7 carbon-free energy for all of its operations.

These 18 new deals span the globe, and include investments in the U.S., Chile and Europe. In the U.S., Google will purchase energy from 720 MW of solar farms in North Carolina (155 MW), South Carolina (75 MW), and Texas (490 MW)—more than doubling the capacity of its global solar portfolio to date. In South America, Google is adding 125 MW of renewable energy capacity to the grid that supplies its data center in Chile. Finally, almost half (793 MW) of the new renewable energy capacity purchased will be located in Europe, specifically Finland (255 MW), Sweden (286 MW), Belgium (92 MW), and Denmark (160 MW).

These renewable energy purchases aren’t only notable for their size. Up to now, most of Google’s renewable energy purchases in the U.S. have been wind-driven, but the declining cost of solar (down more than 80 percent in the past decade) has made harnessing the sun increasingly cost-effective. Meanwhile, our Chile deal marks the first time Google will buy power in a hybrid technology deal that combines solar and wind.

Beyond its own operations, Google is working to make clean energy mainstream and break down the barriers for those who want to purchase renewable energy. So they announced two new grants from Google.org to provide further support for organizations that expand access to clean energy for all businesses: a $500,000 grant to Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance (REBA) in the U.S. and a 500,000 euro grant to RE-Source in Europe. These grants will help fund the development of new purchasing models, provide training and resources for consumers, and enable more widespread access to clean power.

Source: Google

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Foundation of a wind turbine

GES, an integral supplier of engineering, construction and maintenance for renewable energy projects (wind, solar and hydroelectric) will build the Valdejalón wind portfolio consisting of 5 wind farms in Aragón, Spain. Once completed, the wind farms will have a total installed capacity of 231 MW. Construction is expected to be finalized in 2020 second quarter.

The project is divided into two phases: Valdejalón East which includes the wind farms El Cabezo (49 MW) and Portillo II Phase I (45.6 MW) and Phase II (38 MW), and Valdejalón West composed of Virgen de Rodanas I (49.4 MW) and Virgen de Rodanas II (49.4 MW).

The Valdejalón portfolio is fully owned by the Danish fund manager Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners P/S (CIP) through its fund Copenhagen Infrastructure III K/S (CI-III). CIP is a fund management company focused on energy infrastructure including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar PV, biomass and energy-from-waste, transmission and distribution, and other energy assets like reserve capacity and storage. The company operates in Europe, North America and Southeast Asia.

GES is responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction of the project. The company is already working in the detail engineering, and will be in charge of the complete BOP (Balance of Plant), both the civil work, with more than 60 km of roads and 61 foundations and platforms for the 85 m wind turbines to be installed in the park; and the electrical work, including the underground medium voltage network with more than 55 km of trenches and the 132 kV evacuation line of almost another 50 km, which will connect the two new substations to an existing interconnection substation.

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GWEC Market Intelligence has released its updated market outlook concluding that an additional 330 GW of wind energy capacity will be installed from 2019 to 2023, an increase of 9 GW from its market outlook published in Q1 2019. Main markets driving this volume increase are the US and Chinese onshore markets, which will both experience an installation boom over the next two years with 6.5 GW and 10 GW added capacity respectively from the Q1 2019 market outlook. The growing role of offshore wind in the global energy transition is a major reason for boosting overall growth, and will make up approximately 18% of total wind energy capacity by 2023, up from 9% in 2018. The continued growth of wind energy globally will be driven by the increasing cost competiveness of wind energy as well as market-based mechanisms such as auctions, tenders, and bilateral PPAs.

According to the updated market outlook released by GWEC Market Intelligence, an additional 330GW of new wind energy capacity will be added to the global energy market from 2019 to 2023, bringing total capacity to over 900 GW. The outlook has been increased by additional 9 GW from the outlook published in Q1 2019 in GWEC’s annual Global Wind Report.

From 2019 to 2023, the global wind energy market will grow at an annual rate of 4%, reaching a total capacity of over 900 GW by 2023. This growth rate means that an average of approximately an additional 14 GW will be added each year globally over the next five years compared to 2018 growth levels.

Through analysis of the developments of wind markets across the world, two main trends have been identified that will drive growth beyond 2023; the increasing share of so-called subsidy-free projects, and an increasing number of bilateral PPAs. Together, these two mechanisms will contribute to the cost competitiveness of wind energy and provide assurance for large-scale project development and the continued growth of wind energy globally.

Although there was a decrease in the outlook for India and Germany due to their challenging market conditions including the execution of their auctioned capacity, the growth in other markets more than make up for this deficit. With China going subsidy free by 2021 for onshore wind and the Production Tax Credit phasing out in the US, there will be an installation rush over the next two years in these two leading onshore markets.

The forecasts for emerging markets in Latin America, South East Asia, Africa and the Middle East have all been increased as well due to positive market developments. Additionally, it must be acknowledged the importance of offshore wind for driving growth, as it is set to take off globally over the next few years with a compound annual growth rate of 8% between 2019 and 2023, double that of onshore wind.

Wind energy is now one of the most cost-competitive energy sources available, so it is no surprise we will continue to see volume growth as global energy demand continues to increase. On average, 60 GW of onshore wind and 8-10 GW of offshore wind will be added worldwide until 2023. Even when not considering the two key growth markets of US and China, it will still be seen installation growth levels similar to those of the 2009-2010 wind energy boom in the other markets and regions. Although this outlook is very positive, it is not enough to meet the renewable energy targets needed to keep global warming under 1.5 C°.

Total new installations by year for onshore and offshore wind

2018: 50.12 GW
2019: 71.97 GW
2020: 76.43 GW
2021: 61.32 GW
2022: 62.02 GW
2023: 61.83 GW

Changes by region from Q1 2019 (onshore only)

North America: +6.5 GW
Latin America: +2 GW
Europe: -5.9 GW
Africa and the Middle East: +0.8 GW
Asia Pacific: +5.7 GW

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Cumulative offshore wind capacity [GW] worldwide 2010-2019

The worldwide expansion of offshore wind energy, especially in Europe, but also in markets as Asia and North America, causes a further strong increase of global offshore wind capacity. Thus, in Germany, which strongly expanded its capacities within the last years, the electricity generation through offshore wind energy could be increased again: the growth rate in the German North Sea amounted to 16 % and in the German Baltic Sea even to 145 % in the first half of 2019. This is the conclusion reached by the trend and market research institute wind:research in its Half Year Report 2019 The Global Market For Offshore Wind Energy in cooperation with the World Forum Offshore Wind.

The positive development of offshore wind energy is continuing worldwide: while in 2010 the global offshore wind capacity summed up to 3 GW, it increased to 23.3 GW in 2018 and is expected to rise by an additional 27% in 2019 in comparison to the previous year. A look at the planned offshore wind energy projects shows that the positive market development will probably not change in the near future: as of the first half of 2019, the officially planned projects will lead to an overall increase in the worldwide capacity of approximately 46 GW till 2030, a growth of more than 180 %.

The majority of these planned projects is located with almost 36 GW in Europe, a further 6 GW in North America and at least 4 GW in Asia. In Europe, especially striking are the targets of Great Britain, that aim for an increase of its offshore wind capacity by more than 30 GW in 2030, which amounts to a tripling of its current capacity. Germany with its expansion target of 15 GW, the Netherlands with 11.5 GW and France with 10.4 GW fall way behind these ambitious targets. At the same time, outside Europe and especially in Asia the offshore wind energy becomes increasingly popular: thus in Asia the offshore wind capacity summed up to almost 5 GW in the first half of 2019 while in the countries China, South Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam further 3.9 GW are under construction or in planning.

Meanwhile, the importance of supporting political frameworks becomes visible in Germany. The political standstill of the last years regarding offshore wind energy has led to a decrease of investments and workload culminating in insolvencies and market exits of small as well as large market participants. However, technological improvements, such as higher turbine outputs, floating foundations or the use of hydrogen, political measures, such as CO2 pricing, as well as the rising demand for (green) energy for sector coupling, such as electromobility, overall still provide positive market conditions.

Source: Wind:research

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Wind technology contracts activity in July 2019 saw 53 contracts announced, marking a drop of 32% over the last 12-month average of 78, according to GlobalData, a leading data and analytics company.

Onshore was the top category in wind technology in terms of number of contracts for the month, accounting for 35 contracts and a 66% share, followed by Offshore with 17 contracts and a 32.1% share. Onshore Repowered stood in third place with one contract and a 1.9% share.

Looking at global power contracts activity divided by the type of technology, wind held the second position in terms of number of contracts during July 2019 with a 29% share.

The proportion of contracts by category in the Wind technology tracked by GlobalData in the month was as follows:

  • Supply & Erection: 21 contracts and a 39.6% share
  • Project Implementation: 19 contracts and a 35.8% share
  • Power Purchase Agreement: ten contracts and an 18.9% share
  • Repair, Maintenance, Upgrade & Others: one contract and a 1.9% share
  • Consulting & Similar Services: one contract and a 1.9% share
  • Electricity Supply: one contract and a 1.9% share

 

Europe leads wind contracts activity in July 2019
Comparing contracts activity in wind technology in different regions of the globe, Europe held the top position with 24 contracts and a share of 45.3% during July 2019, followed by North America with 14 contracts and a 26.4% share and Asia-Pacific with eight contracts and a 15.1% share.

In fourth place was South and Central America with four contracts and a 7.5% share and in fifth place was Middle East and Africa with three contracts and a 5.7% share.

Wind technology contracts in July 2019: Top companies by capacity
The top issuers of contracts in Wind technology for the month in terms of power capacity involved were:

  • EDF Renewables North America (United States): 514MW from two contracts
  • Plambeck Emirates: 500MW from one contract
  • EDF Renewables (United States) and Abu Dhabi Future Energy (United Arab Emirates): 415.8MW capacity from one contract

Wind technology contracts in July 2019: Top winners by capacity
The top winners of contracts for the month in terms of power capacity involved were:

  • Infrastructure and Energy Alternatives (United States): 514MW from two contracts
  • Saipem (Italy): 500MW from one contract
  • Vestas Mediterranean (Spain): 415.8MW capacity from one contract

Source: GlobalData

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The European Investment Bank (EIB) is set to finance one of the biggest wind power infrastructure projects in Spain to date: the construction of 21 wind farms in Andalusia, Asturias, Castilla-La Mancha, Castilla León, Galicia and Navarra. These new facilities will have a total capacity of 547 MW and will generate approximately 1.491 GWh of energy a year overall, a volume equivalent to the power use of 360 000 Spanish homes. It is one of the largest wind power projects financed by the EIB in Spain following its contribution to the financing of the Goya project.

The wind farms included in this project were winning bids in the renewable energy auction that took place in Spain in July 2017, and have been developed by the Alfanar group. The EU bank will provide the project with several loans totalling up to EUR 385m for construction and implementation. The two entities have already signed the first of these, under which the EIB is providing EUR 44.2m to develop the first phase of the project. This EU bank financing, together with the additional loan from various financial institutions, will be provided via a Project Finance arrangement for the construction of the first four wind farms, which will have a capacity of around 99 MW.

The loan was signed under the Investment Plan for Europe (known as the Juncker Plan) whose support increases the EIB Group’s capacity to finance investment projects that by their structure or nature have a higher risk profile. This project will not receive any public sector support and is one of the first to be implemented under the new regulatory framework for the industry approved in Spain in 2013.

Promoting renewable energies is one of the EU bank’s priorities as the world’s biggest financer of climate action projects. Once they become operational, the 21 wind farms will help cut greenhouse gas emissions in Spain and expand the production of clean energy using renewable sources. The construction phase will require the employment of 1 900 people, and 170 people will need to be taken on permanently to operate the wind farms.

Source: EIB

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