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wind turbines

Vestas has secured a 168 MW order for a wind park in Mexico. The order derives from a corporate power purchase agreement (PPA) and includes the supply and installation of 42 wind turbines of the 4 MW platform with V150 rotors. The order also includes an Active Output Management 5000 (AOM 5000) service agreement for the operation and maintenance of the wind park over the next five years.

The 73-metre long blades of the Vestas 150m rotors will be locally manufactured in the TPI Composites factory in Matamoros, which provides Vestas with blades for the increasing number of V136 and V150 orders that the company is receiving in Mexico and Latin America. The turbine towers will also be produced by local suppliers.

Vestas pioneered the Mexican wind energy market when it installed the first commercial wind turbine in 1994. Since then, Vestas has accumulated over 2,3 GW of installed capacity or under construction in the country.

Source: Vestas

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Foundation of a wind turbine

GES, an integral supplier of engineering, construction and maintenance for renewable energy projects (wind, solar and hydroelectric) will build the Valdejalón wind portfolio consisting of 5 wind farms in Aragón, Spain. Once completed, the wind farms will have a total installed capacity of 231 MW. Construction is expected to be finalized in 2020 second quarter.

The project is divided into two phases: Valdejalón East which includes the wind farms El Cabezo (49 MW) and Portillo II Phase I (45.6 MW) and Phase II (38 MW), and Valdejalón West composed of Virgen de Rodanas I (49.4 MW) and Virgen de Rodanas II (49.4 MW).

The Valdejalón portfolio is fully owned by the Danish fund manager Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners P/S (CIP) through its fund Copenhagen Infrastructure III K/S (CI-III). CIP is a fund management company focused on energy infrastructure including offshore wind, onshore wind, solar PV, biomass and energy-from-waste, transmission and distribution, and other energy assets like reserve capacity and storage. The company operates in Europe, North America and Southeast Asia.

GES is responsible for the engineering, procurement and construction of the project. The company is already working in the detail engineering, and will be in charge of the complete BOP (Balance of Plant), both the civil work, with more than 60 km of roads and 61 foundations and platforms for the 85 m wind turbines to be installed in the park; and the electrical work, including the underground medium voltage network with more than 55 km of trenches and the 132 kV evacuation line of almost another 50 km, which will connect the two new substations to an existing interconnection substation.

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Offshore wind East Anglia One

Iberdrola has hooked up the East Anglia One offshore wind farm to the British electricity grid. It is building the facilities in the North Sea, around 50 km from the coast of the county of Suffolk, in the United Kingdom, and it is scheduled to go into operation next year.

The first of 102 wind turbines, the so-called WTG E19, has already supplied clean power to the land substation in Burstall. Its subsidiary, ScottishPower Renewables, which installed 25 turbines on the site this summer, will gradually connect them to the grid.

With an investment of approximately 2.5 MM£ and covering an area of 300 km2, East Anglia One is one of the largest scale projects being developed by Iberdrola and the biggest renewable initiative ever developed by a Spanish company.

Once commissioned in 2020, it will be the world’s biggest wind farm, with an installed capacity of 714 MW that will supply 630,000 British homes with clean energy.

The construction of East Anglia One is driving the offshore power industry in Europe, providing jobs for more than 1,300 people in several countries – Spain, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the United Arab Emirates – and is crucial to several sectors, such as the naval industry. The project has been a great driving force in Spain, since Iberdrola has used local companies like Navantia, Windar and Siemens-Gamesa for the development of many of the essential components of the wind farm.

Technical specifications ofeast anglia one

  • 102 Siemens Gamesa wind turbines make up the wind farm, each with a capacity of 7 MW. Once installed, they will have a total height of 167 m.
  • A marine substation (Andalusia II), manufactured by Navantia in Puerto Real (Cádiz), will be responsible for receiving the electricity produced by the wind turbines and transforming the voltage so it can be sent to the coast through two undersea cables, each around 85 km long.
  • These cables are joined to a further six underground cables measuring around 37 km and running from Bawdsey to the new land-based transformer in Burstall, which connects the offshore wind farm to the national grid.
  • Of the 102 jacket-type foundations, Navantia has manufactured 42 in Fene (Spain) and Windar has built the pilot cables in Avilés (Asturias). The other 60 foundations were manufactured by Lamprell in the United Arab Emirates and by Harland & Wolff in Belfast.

 

Iberdrola, steadfast commitment to offshore wind power

Over the next few years, Iberdrola will redouble its investment in offshore wind production, developing a project portfolio with over 10,000 MW. This growth focuses on three main areas: the North Sea, the Baltic Sea and the United States.

Clean power generated by offshore wind farms are the cornerstone of the company’s strategy, which expects to allocate 39% of the 34 MM€ earmarked for the 2018-2022 period to this type of generation: 13.26 MM€.

The group is currently operating two offshore wind farms: West of Duddon Sands, which went into service in the North Sea in 2014, and Wikinger, in the German waters of the Baltic Sea, which has been operational since December 2017.

In the United States, Iberdrola is in the process of building the biggest offshore wind farm in that country: Vineyard Wind. Just off the coast of Massachusetts, it will produce 800 MW of power to cover the energy needs of a million homes.

In Germany, in April 2018, the company was awarded contracts to build two new plants in the Baltic Sea, with a total of 486 MW of power: Baltic Eagle and Wikinger South.

In addition to these new plants, the Sant Brieuc Wind Farm, which is located in French waters, is scheduled to be commissioned in 2022. It will have 496 MW of installed power and will be located just off the coast of French Brittany, 20 km offshore.

Once these projects are operating in late 2022, the company will have installed 2,000 MW of offshore wind power, after which it will add a further 1,000.

Iberdrola is seizing this excellent opportunity for growth, with ambitious objectives for new wind generation facilities in the United Kingdom and the United States for the next few years: 30,000 MW for 2030 in the former and 25,000 MW in the latter, each with different timelines.

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In the UK, Deutsche Windtechnik started service for Senvion turbines.

The UK subsidiary of Deutsche Windtechnik is expanding its national portfolio by providing O&M for 5 wind farms operated by Innogy Renewables UK. Besides Siemens, AN Bonus and NEG Micon, the independent service provider now counts also Senvion wind turbines as part of its knowledge base in the UK, and hence follows the path of the other Deutsche Windtechnik units. The group serves more than 400 wind turbines of all Senvion-productions series, onshore as well as offshore.

 

New contracts enlarge service infrastructure in the UK

The new maintenance contracts in the UK cover a total of 40 Senvion wind turbines – for MM70, MM82 and MM92 – and run for three years each. The proximity of the wind farms gives Deutsche Windtechnik the opportunity to install cross-park service structures in the northern regions of England including a warehouse and local office. Deutsche Windtechnik Ltd. will employ additional service teams, engineers and supervisors with a broad expertise in Senvion technology, with the first teams already having been employed. With this reinforcement the total number of employees in the UK business unit reaches 100.

Knowledge transfer provides bases for high-quality Senvion service

Billy Stevenson, Managing Director of Deutsche Windtechnik Ltd., is convinced that this milestone will be further proof that the ISP is capable of delivering the highest level of service quality:”Within the Deutsche Windtechnik Group we cover Senvion wind turbines with a capacity of 590 MW already. We have a very close knowledge transfer with the Training Center and engineering department of Deutsche Windtechnik in Germany, so we guarantee a top level service quality starting with the first day of the term.” After winning the Innogy Supplier Award in the Quality Global category, Deutsche Windtechnik is prepared to underline the standard of high quality in its everyday core competencies.

Source: Deutsche Windtechnik

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Sulzer Schmid, a Swiss company pioneering UAV technology for rotor blade inspections, and NNAISENSE, an artificial intelligence specialist, have partnered to develop an artificial intelligence engine to automatically detect rotor blade damages on wind turbine. This leapfrog technology is expected to bring the twin benefits of improving the productivity and consistency of blade inspection processes.

With this new development effort, the two partners are aiming to build the industry’s most powerful artificial intelligence engine able to recognize damages based on inspection image material. The initial version will be able to flag all areas of concern on any given damaged blade. Ensuing upgrades will add other capabilities such as the ability to establish damage categories and severity levels.

The autonomously flying drones of the 3DX™ Inspection Platform of Sulzer Schmid assure high-definition quality and consistent image acquisition time as well as 100% blade coverage while minimizing human errors and operational risks. The cutting-edge image assessment tools of the platform ensure detailed and efficient damage assessment. With the support of an AI-enabled inspection software, the review work of blade experts will be greatly facilitated. Instead of having to review the entire surface of the blades, they will simply need to focus on the pre-selected areas of concern. This technology progress will not only significantly boost the productivity of the reviewing teams but will also improve the quality of damage annotation processes.

Source: Sulzer Schmid

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Asia-Pacific (APAC) is expected to lead the wind turbine market with an annual installation capacity of 33.14 GW by 2023, largely driven by onshore deployment; followed by EMEA and Americas with capacities of 19.9GW and 11.7GW, respectively, according to GlobalData.

The company’s latest report ‘Wind Turbine, Update 2019 – Global Market Size, Competitive Landscape and Key Country Analysis to 2023’ reveals that the buoyancy in the market is largely due to the global investment trends in renewable energy to address power sector challenges.

In the forecast period (2019–2023), wind turbine installations are expected to reach an aggregate of 312.39GW. APAC will continue to lead the market, with an aggregate of 157.61GW of installed capacity, followed by EMEA and Americas with 88.41 GW and 66.36 GW, respectively.

The APAC region led the onshore wind turbine market by registering an aggregate capacity of 138.20GW between 2014 and 2018, and will continue to do so in the future. The need to improve access to electricity, increasing consumption trends and strong industrial market are primary driving factors for onshore wind turbines market.

The growth in the APAC region is largely contributed by China, which has established comprehensive development plans focused on using renewable energy to sustain its growth and ambitions of becoming a global leader in wind technology development.

In the offshore market, EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa) dominated the market and will continue to do so reaching 4.77GW in 2023. EMEA’s dominance is largely driven by the European market. The strong technology base in Europe, favorable wind conditions and increasing effectiveness of offshore wind turbines have contributed to the large scale deployment of offshore wind technology to capitalize on the significantly larger resource.

Source: GlobalData

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Nordex has commissioned TÜV SÜD to carry out type certification of their latest wind turbine N149/5.X and N163/5.X. The wind turbines are designed for land-constrained markets in Europe as well as other global markets, such as the USA and Australia. Type certification of wind turbines is a procedure recognised at international level for establishing that these complex technical systems comply with international standards.

The wind turbines N149/5.X and N163/5.X are designed specifically for regions with low to medium wind speeds. They have a variable output in the 5-MW-range and rotor diameters of 149 to 163 m. With hub heights between 105 and 164 m, Nordex ensures efficient and safe operation even in complex on-site conditions. The N149/5.X and N163/5.X are both based on the proven concept of the N149/4.0-4.5 wind turbine. Representing the next step in turbine evolution, they are the most powerful wind turbines in the Nordex portfolio.

Type certification of wind turbines is a procedure recognised at international level for establishing compliance with international standards. Within the scope of wind turbine type certification, TÜV SÜD’s experts examine and assess the overall design and all key components of the wind turbine. Certification is aimed at verifying and validating the quality of standard-conforming design and production and the wind turbine’s power performance.

Investors, project engineers and wind-farm managers worldwide rely on wind turbines certified according to international standards”, says Jochen Stauber, Project Manager Wind Turbine Type Certification, TÜV SÜD Industrie Service GmbH. “Given this, type certification is regarded as a prerequisite for tendering in international wind energy projects.” Type certification frequently represents the first step within the scope of the project certification process.

Nordex commissioned TÜV SÜD to perform not only type certification, but also type approval of its turbines according to the 2012 DIBt guideline based on German construction law. Completion of certification, followed by serial production, is scheduled for 2021.

Source: TÜV SÜD

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The Nordex Group is further extending its product portfolio in the market segment of wind turbines with a nominal capacity of more than 5 MW. The N163/5.X wind turbine will be presented at the German Husum Wind Fair, which takes place from 10 – 13 September 2019.

Compared to the recently launched N149/5.X wind turbine, the N163/5.X shows its strengths particularly on projects with lower wind speeds. The nacelle, gearbox and all system components of the N163/5.X have been taken over from the N149/5.X. A new element is the single-piece rotor blade, with a length of nearly 80 m, based on the proven and tested glass fibre/carbon fibre differential construction concept of the N149, which Nordex has been using in serial production for its blades since 2011.

The rotor diameter has been increased by 14 m to a total of 163 m compared to that of the N149/5.X. This makes it one of the biggest rotors in the onshore segment. This larger rotor diameter results in a swept area of 20,867 m2 Compared to the N149/4.0-4.5, currently being produced in series, this means an additional yield of up to 20 percent for the new wind turbine.

The N163/5.X is designed for maximum flexibility and can be operated in different modes in the 5 MW range depending on site requirements and customer needs. This enables customers to individually configure the wind farm with regards to energy yield, turbine lifetime, rating and sound requirements, and thus adapt it ideally to the specific business model. The N163/5.X continues the successful approach of a flexible power range of the Delta4000 wind turbines N149/4.0-4.5 and N149/5.X.

The wind turbine will initially be offered with hub heights of between 118 and 164 m. The wind turbine options also include a cold climate version for operation in temperatures as low as -30°C. The start of the series production of the N163/5.X is scheduled for 2021.

Source: Nordex Group

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The Nordex Group has notched up another success in Spain: the Alfanar Group has commissioned the manufacturer to supply and install 22 wind turbines for two wind farms with a total of 67.2 MW. Both orders also include full service for a period of 20 years.

The two wind farms are to be built in the province of Albacete in Castilla-La Mancha, approx. 300 kilometres to the south-east of Madrid. The Barrax wind farm will include ten AW140/3000 wind turbines and three AW132/3300 wind turbines. For the Chinchilla wind farm, Nordex will provide eight AW140/3000 wind turbines and one AW132/3300 wind turbine.

The wind turbines will be installed on concrete towers with a hub height of 120 metres, with delivery scheduled for the second half of 2020.

Source: Nordex Group

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WindEurope, Cefic (the European Chemical Industry Council) and EUCIA (the European Composites Industry Association) have created a cross-sector platform to advance novel approaches to the recycling of wind turbine blades.

In 2018 wind energy supplied 14% of the electricity in the EU with 130,000 wind turbines and this number will only grow in the coming decades. Wind turbines blades are made up of a composite material, which boosts the performance of wind energy by allowing lighter and longer blades.

In the next five years 12,000 wind turbines are expected to be decommissioned. Broadening the range of recycling options is critical for the industry’s development.

Wind energy is an increasingly important part of Europe’s energy mix. The first generation of wind turbines are now starting to come to the end of their operational life and be replaced by modern turbines. Recycling the old blades is a top priority, and teaming up with the chemical and composites industries will enable to do it the most effective way.

The chemical industry plays a decisive role in the transition to a circular economy by investing in the research and development of new materials, which make wind turbine blades more reliable, affordable and recyclable.

Learnings from wind turbine recycling will then be transferred to other markets to enhance the overall sustainability of composites.

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